Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 23

2002: Let's Keep Dancing
Byline: George F. Will Onward and upward with homo sapiens. A 7 million-year-old skull uncovered this year in Central Africa belonged to someone the size of a chimpanzee and is the earliest--by about a million years--yet discovered member of the...
A Cardinal Offense: After a Year of Controversy over His Handling of Sex-Abuse Cases, Bernard Law Quit. How It Happened. What It Means
Byline: Jerry Adler It began in the basement of a church in Wellesley, Mass., where 25 parishioners gathered one evening last January to discuss the sex-abuse scandal whose ghastly outlines were just beginning to emerge in the newspapers and courtrooms....
Adding Up the Stimulus Plan
Byline: Allen Sloan If there's one thing we're supposed to have learned from this year of business scandals and disasters, it's the danger of believing numbers that are too good to be true. The Enron and WorldCom implosions are about made-up math,...
A Man out of Time: Trent Lott and the GOP Grew Up Together in the South. They Both Have a Painful Secret
Byline: Jon Meacham It was just a quick stop, at a store on a campaign trip through the Northeast more than a dozen years ago. Trent Lott, then a Mississippi congressman about to make his move for the Senate, was visiting a state for a Republican...
And Just in Time for Christmas
Byline: David Ansen As usual, Hollywood has saved its must-see movies for the holiday season, when credit cards are maxing and discretionary income is minning. David Ansen reviews five of the inescapables: LORD OF THE RINGS: THE TWO TOWERS ...
Catch Them If You Can: What Do You Want for Christmas? How about Spielberg Behind the Camera-And Hanks and DiCaprio in Front of It? A Candid Conversation with Three Superstars
Byline: Jeff Giles This Christmas, as has become the custom, we will receive a great many movies, not all of them presents. Steven Spielberg, fortunately, comes bearing "Catch Me If You Can," a surprisingly touching chase movie set in the sunny...
Charge It, Santa Baby
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn Shoppers won't snub Santa this year. Confidence is rising, real incomes continue to increase and retail sales last month were better than the industry expected. OK, mall life is still a little sluggish. But consumers who've...
Charity Means You Don't Pick and Choose: I Know the Arguments against Giving Handouts, but Who Am I to Decide Who Deserves Kindness?
Byline: Patricia O'Hara "If you're not going to eat that, little boy, I will," said the man sitting on the sidewalk to my son, who was holding a doggie bag of restaurant leftovers. It was the first time my son had ever seen a homeless person. He...
Couch Potato Heaven: Cable Companies May Have Finally Figured out How to Give TV Viewers What They Want: The Ability to Watch a Movie, Any Time, without a Schlep to the Video Store
Byline: Brad Stone Today's tech wizards seem to anticipate our needs before we know we have them, like putting weather forecasts on cell phones and navigation systems in cars. But they haven't yet satisfied a pretty basic wish--to impulsively watch...
First Time for Everything: One Picture, Three Debuts. but That Director Sure Looks Familiar
Byline: Allison Samuels No Hollywood screenwriter would have dared to dream up a story as improbable as Antwone Fisher's--except one. Fisher grew up in Cleveland's foster-care system; his foster parents neglected and abused him, and he picked fights...
Friends or Foes: One Underground Iraqi Group Is Saddam's Fiercest Enemy, Which Should Make It a U.S. Ally. but Al Daawa Has Lots of American Blood on Its Hands
Byline: Christopher Dickey and Colin Soloway In the long and bloody reign of Saddam Hussein, only one Iraqi opposition group has ever really scared him. For three decades the secretive underground organization Al Daawa al Islamiyah--the Islamic...
Ghosts of the Past: It Was a Washington Classic: History Suddenly Rears Up and Threatens a Safe Pol's Security. Anatomy of the Lott Firestorm
Byline: Howard Fineman Mitch McConnell, who loves his role as Washington's coldest-blooded tough guy, got right to the point in a cross-country conference call last Friday night with a score of his fellow Republican senators. The topic: what to...
High-Seas Hunting: Can Terrorists Slip a Nuke into a U.S. Port? Inside the Customs Op to Prevent Them
Byline: Mark Hosenball and Evan Thomas North Korea can export missile and nuclear technology to the highest bidder. It's a capitalist practice," a North Korean spokesman told New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof last October. Was the North...
I Love My Car: Take a Tame Honda Civic, Add about 20 Grand's Worth of Special Fenders, Lights and Wheels, and You've Got a Rad Ride
Byline: Vanessa Juarez and Devin Gordon Oh, the things a "tuner" would love to do to your car... They know what you think of that Honda Civic in your driveway. Safe. Practical. Fuel-efficient. "This car," you think, "was a smart purchase." Here's...
Kissinger: Probing the Client Controversy
Byline: Michael Isikoff and Mark Hosenball White House aides were taken aback last week when Henry Kissinger, seeking to avoid further controversy about his consulting business, abruptly stepped down as chair of the independent commission to investigate...
Lessons of the Trent Lott Mess: Silver Linings: If We Are Lucky, What Will Come of This Sorry Mess Is a Wider Awareness That Virtue Is Rooted in Squarely Acknowledging Where We Have Gone Wrong
Byline: Ellis Cose Ritual apologies are, by definition, insincere and embarrassingly predictable, but few are as willfully obtuse as that offered by Trent Lott. Though not as comical as the Flip Wilson ("The devil made me do it") defense, it was...
Mail Call: Teen Abstinence: An Age-Old Question
Our Dec. 9 cover story on "The New Virginity" drew mostly supportive responses from teenagers, parents and educators alike. "Your articles, framed in a positive manner, precipitated a healthy discussion of sex habits with our two teenage boys," one...
Newsmakers
Byline: Jac Chebatoris and David Gates; Malcolm Jones The Moby Mystery Last week a couple of still-unidentified guys attacked pop-electronica whiz Moby as he signed autographs outside a Boston nightclub. "The only description of the perpetrators,"...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom, left to right: The Washington Post, 20/20, CNN, Fox News, The Washington Post (2), Fox News, New York Post, Associated Press, L.A. Times "I both apologize and from them beg forgiveness." Cardinal Bernard...
The Blairs: Foreign Flat Fiasco
Byline: Stryker McGuire Back when the Clintons were in the White House, the Blairs of London looked staid by comparison. No Whitewater, no interns. Blair's walks on the wild side were limited to picking up an electric guitar. His wife, Cherie, was...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker I read that first in NEWSWEEK. We like it when our readers can say that. And if you've been following the magazine this year, you may have had that reaction to two of the biggest news stories of last week. In late February,...
The Wound Is Not Healed: For America's Catholics, Law's Resignation Is but a Beginning
Byline: Kenneth L. Woodward Last September Boston College invited me to address the current crisis in the Roman Catholic Church--my church. Four thousand people turned out, not because I was speaker, but because their anger and frustration over...
Time to Expose the Mullahs: Students Are Protesting in Tehran by the Thousands. but This Is Not an Equal Fight. the Ruling Clerics Have the Money and the Power
Byline: Fareed Zakaria What country in the Middle East supports a flourishing terrorist network and is steadily acquiring weapons of mass destruction? If you said Iraq, you're one letter off. It's Iran, which the State Department has long branded...
Travel: A Shangri-La of Winter
Byline: Arthur Frommer It can be bitterly cold in Beijing in November, and yet the hotels last month were jammed with tourists from around the world, including large numbers from the U.S.A. China is now a major travel destination (the Chinese...
We Don't Talk This Way: Conservatives Were Quick to Jump on Lott, and Properly So: His Comments Taint the Movement. the View from the Right
Byline: David Brooks After Trent Lott's repulsive comments at Strom Thurmond's 100th-birthday party, Democrats and independents have a right to ask the following questions: Is this the way Republicans talk when they are alone? Is this what they...
Welcome to the Occupation: A Skeptical, Satirical New Comedy, Straight Outta Palestine
Byline: Lorraine Ali In Palestinian filmmaker Elia Suleiman's "Divine Intervention," a sexy Arab girl saunters through a military checkpoint like a supermodel down a catwalk, a sweating Santa is chased by knife-wielding kids and an apricot pit tossed...