Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from March 10

A Review to Die for? after His Celebrated Restaurant's Rating Was Lowered, One of France's Best-Known Chefs Commits Suicide
Byline: Jerry Adler All Bernard Loiseau ever asked of himself as a chef was perfection, and for the past decade, that sufficed. The American journalist William Echikson once chronicled a year in Loiseau's monomaniacal quest for three Michelin stars...
Beware of Greeks Bearing Big Fat Sitcoms
Byline: Devin Gordon My Big Fat Greek Life," the TV phase of creator and star Nia Vardalos's campaign to take over American pop culture, makes one significant change from the movie. Yes, John Corbett, who played the husband in "My Big Fat Greek...
Blood, Oil & Iraq: The Iraq Showdown Is Not over Petroleum, Even If Some Think of It as 'Black Gravy'
Byline: Michael Hirsh Vladimir Putin knows his value to George W. Bush. The U.S. president hasn't talked to Gerhard Schroder, Germany's newly pacifist chancellor, in months. Jacques Chirac--zut!--Bush hasn't much time for him these days. Bush's...
Bush and God: A Higher Calling: It Is His Defining Journey-From Reveler to Revelation. A Biography of His Faith, and How He Wields It as He Leads a Nation on the Brink of War
Byline: Howard Fineman George W. Bush rises ahead of the dawn most days, when the loudest sound outside the White House is the dull, distant roar of F-16s patrolling the skies. Even before he brings his wife, Laura, a morning cup of coffee, he goes...
Dance of the Cubans: Miami Community Leaders Are Taking a Kinder, Gentler Approach to the Fidel Castro Regime
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores Usmanis Barreiros is no fan of Fidel Castro. "Communism," he says, "is s--t." A year and a half ago, Barreiros, 58, emigrated legally from the island (Cuba allows some to leave each year), landing in Miami with his wife...
Daniel Libeskind Takes Home the Prize: After a Bruising Competition, a World-Class Avant-Garde Designer Wins Architecture's Commission of the Century: The Remaking of the World Trade Center Site
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan You have to catch Daniel Libeskind on the fly these days. The once obscure architect--a revered avant-garde theorist who spent the first 20 years of his career without building so much as a birdhouse--was a besieged New...
Elmer Bernstein: From the Gray List to the A List
Byline: Elise Christenson You may not recognize Elmer Bernstein's name, but you'll recognize his music. In more than 50 years he's composed the scores to such movies as "The Magnificent Seven," "To Kill a Mockingbird," "Thoroughly Modern Millie,"...
Everybody's Next-Door Neighbor: The Ever-Gentle, Unfailingly Calm Fred Rogers: 1928-2003
Byline: Daniel Mcginn Though word of his death had hit the morning news shows a few hours earlier, Fred Rogers looked as chipper as ever last Thursday as he strolled in the familiar front door. Judging from the grayness of his hair, this was one...
Homeland Insecurity: Budget Woes Force States to Pull Cops off the Street
Byline: Nadine Joseph and Rebecca Sinderbrand Remote and tranquil, the little Oregon town of Enterprise is an idyllic place to escape the hassles of life. Residents are just hoping outlaws don't feel the same way. With severe cuts in funding for...
'I'm a Church Man': After the Scandal, a Handful of Priests Get Back to Work
Byline: Daniel McGinn In the back of St. Ann's Catholic Church in West Bridgewater, Mass., there's a bulletin board covered with yellow Post-Its. It's the parish Prayer Wall. Most of the supplicants seek God's help for relatives who are sick. But...
In Bed with the Pentagon
Byline: Jonathan Alter I spent a few days in December on an aircraft carrier in the Gulf. My bunkmates were Palestinian journalists from the Mideast Broadcasting Co. (MBC), all of whom acknowledged that they refer to suicide bombers in their reports...
Japan's Hidden Gems: Stocks Are Trading at Fire-Sale Prices, and Investors Are Starting to Hunt for Deals
Byline: George Wehrfritz There are many potentially lucrative little secrets hidden in Japan, and Exedy Corp. may be one of them. It's come up with a new technology for lightweight transmissions used in hybrid and fuel-cell-powered vehicles. Exedy...
Mother Knows Best: One of Kim Jong Il's Sons Tried to Visit Disneyland. the Other May Be Winning the Succession Struggle
Byline: George Wehrfritz and Hideko Takayama Even by Pyongyang's bizarre standards, the military directive is a strange one. Instead of laying down new orders or repeating old ones, the 16-page internal document, circulated by the People's Army,...
Newsmakers
Byline: David Gates, Devin Gordon Fighting The Power If antiwar folks were hoping for high drama at last week's Grammys, they must have gotten the wrong decade. True, Sheryl Crow wore that no war guitar strap, but not the T shirt the Recording...
Of Chips, Putts and Chokes: Johnny Miller Is Golf's Most Outspoken Analyst
Byline: David Noonan Arnold Palmer walked up the 18th fairway at the end of the second round of the 2002 U.S. Senior Open last June to the sound of cheers and applause. It was a warm and familiar scene. "Yet another ovation for the king," said NBC...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom: Newsweek Bureau Reports, The Hill, Dayton Daily News, Associated Press, The Hill, (Canada) National Post, Associated Press, CNN, Associated Press, Variety "I'm not afraid. I'll be a human shield." Iraqi...
Pixels to Pavement: Carmakers, Desperate to Connect with Gen Y, Are Discovering the Best Place to Hang for Inspiration and Buzz: Videogames
Byline: Keith Naughton When Mazda decided to bring back its legendary RX sports car a few years ago, it feared it would be eating the Nissan Z's dust. The resurrected Z would hit the streets a year ahead of the RX-8. To get a jump on the competition,...
Preemies Grow Up: Preterm Births Are on the Rise, but New Medical Studies Show That the Tiniest Babies Often Do Just Fine
Byline: Claudia Kalb Next month Danny Schuster will celebrate his 10th birthday. His parents, Carol and Jim, will celebrate his resiliency, his spirit--his life. Born more than three months early, at 1 pound, 15 ounces, Danny entered a world of...
Saudis: No 'Particular Concern'
Byline: Michael Isikoff In a move expected to infuriate religious conservatives and human-rights advocates alike, the Bush administration has decided to reject the recommendation of a special government commission to place Saudi Arabia on an American...
Sifting the Embers in Rhode Island
Byline: Seth Mnookin with Ken Shulman in Rhode Island Six-hundred dollars. That's how much more money it would have cost the owners of a Rhode Island nightclub to buy fire-resistant sound insulation instead of the highly flammable packaging foam...
Strange Days in Indio: At an Arab-Themed County Fair, Sweetness Is a War Casualty
Byline: Lorraine Ali We were surrounded by men in fezzes and women in harem garb, yet it was pretty safe to say that my dad--a Baghdad native--was the only real Arab at the 1973 Indio National Date Festival. The other men at this annual county fair...
Technology: I Want My Dvd Player
Byline: Peter Suciu They've been around for only six years, but DVD players are already one of the fastest-growing consumer-electronics products ever invented. From 2001 to 2002 alone, sales and rentals of DVDs increased from $6.8 billion to $11.6...
Temporary Worker, Permanent Loser? I Can Deal with the Low Pay and Lackluster Love Life. but Please, Don't Ask Me If I'm Having Fun Yet
Byline: Michael Rybicki One day I was talking with one of my fellow temporary employees when he let it drop that he merely uses temping to supplement the income from his private business. So I asked him how he employs himself. Turns out he pet-sits...
The Banality of Fear: Saddam's Power Doesn't Rest Only on His Family, or Even on His Intelligence Apparatus. He Has a Vast Bureaucracy of Helpers
Byline: Christopher Dickey The 19-year-old German beauty queen hoped TO see President Saddam Hussein last week, but had to settle for what she called "a very long meeting" with his elder son, Uday. The next morning over breakfast she spoke in such...
The Biggest Catch Yet: Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, A.K.A. 'The Brain,' Was Planning Horrific New Attacks on the United States
Byline: Mark Hosenball and Evan Thomas In the top drawer of his desk in the Oval Office, President George W. Bush keeps a list of the most-wanted Qaeda operatives. Whenever one is captured or killed, he crosses his name off. Last week the president...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker As we were working on this week's cover package, I kept wondering why the press has not paid more attention to George W. Bush's religious beliefs. Some have (including the excellent Web site beliefnet.com), but a LexisNexis...
The Keys to the Future: A New Generation of Pianists Re-Energize the World of Jazz
Byline: Seth Mnookin Manhattan's P.J. Clarke's was crowded with men showing off their 30-inch waists and women packed into dresses that seemed to be spirit-gummed to their bodies. It was Esquire's 70th anniversary party. The wait staff was handing...
The Sin of Pride: Vision Thing: A Scholar Wonders If Bush Has the Humility to See the Nuance of This Conflict
Byline: Martin E. Marty "God bless America." For decades, chief executives have acted like priests of the national religion. Sometimes they soothe--think of shuttle disasters or terrorist attacks--and sometimes they inflame, as in times of war....
The Telecoms in Purgatory: The FCC's Latest Decree Oozes Obscurity. Instead of Fostering Competition, It's a Godsend for Lawyers, Guaranteeing Lengthy Court Challenges
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson We all know that the telecommunications industry is an economic mess. Since 2000, the equipment firms (the Lucents and Nortels) have cut 500,000 jobs, says Matthew Flanigan of the Telecommunications Industry Association,...
The White House: Gospel on the Potomac: Every President since Washington Has Invoked the Almighty. but You Can't Judge a Politician by the Scripture He Quotes
Byline: Kenneth L. Woodward Whenever a president speaks openly of his religious faith, citizens want to know how that faith affects his political priorities. And so we look for clues. But the lines between religious convictions and public policy...
Using the Same Old Eyes
Byline: Mark Hosenball and Tamara Lipper In creating the department of Homeland Security, Congress aimed for a new bureaucracy with its own staff of analysts to cast a fresh eye over "raw" intelligence from the CIA, FBI and NSA. The department's...
Waiting, One Hand Behind: Our History Books Say We Fight for Freedom. They Don't Say Anything about Going into Battle to Save Face. and Whose Face Are We Trying to Save?
Byline: Anna Quindlen I am waiting for something. I'm not sure exactly what it is until my father calls. He is equal parts exasperated and anguished, a man who reads history voraciously and yet is now flabbergasted by current events. "We don't attack...
We Had a Farm in Africa: A Fresh, Oscar-Worthy Tale of the Jewish Diaspora
Byline: David Ansen If Hitler hadn't come along, Jettel and Walter Redlich would have considered themselves more German than Jewish. But in 1938 Walter (Merab Ninidze), a lawyer, is prescient enough to know he has to get his wife and daughter Regina...