Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 131, No. 13, March 30

A Beverly Hillbilly: Country Singer Dwight Yoakam Steals Scenes from His Prettier Costars in 'Newton Boys.'(the Motion Picture 'Newton Boys')(Brief Article)
When Dwight Yoakam makes a record, the normal abnormal collection of friends drops by the Los Angeles studio. Hipster actress Chloe Webb, who costars with Yoakam in the new film "The Newton Boys," chats quietly with a friend in the control room. Texas...
Booming Amusement Parks: The Theme Is Extreme
After "jurassic park" ordinary amusement parks looked so ... ordinary. But fear not, adrenaline junkies: at the total-immersion theme parks of the future, guests will get to play pulse-quickening roles. "The illusion of danger and close brushes with...
Class Struggle
In a provocative new look, a veteran education writer rates public schools by their willingness to give as many students as possible the opportunity to do most advanced work. His conclusion: kids will strive for the best if they get the chance. Brian...
Cutting through the Fog: In a Smart Legal Brief, Clinton's Lawyers Pinpoint the Holes in Paula Jones's Case
In a smart legal brief, Clinton's lawyers pinpoint the holes in Paula Jones's case. The argument was concise and contemptuous. In his last-ditch attempt Friday to persuade a federal judge to throw out Paula Jones's sexual-harassment ease against...
Fighting for Africa; with His Trip, Clinton Aims to Cement America's New Hold on the Continent; That's a Development the French Would like Very Much to Reverse
With his trip, Clinton aims to cement America's new hold on the continent. That's a development the French would very much like to reverse. For one day this week, a rush of security men and limousines will disturb the tropical languor of Entebbe's...
Glorifying the Obvious: Listen Carefully as a New Movement Called Technorealism Tries to Make Sense of Progress
Welcome, traveler, to the Technorealism Web site (www.technorealism.org). Here is a document hoping to establish "a more nuanced and useful way to think about the changes that are occurring in computing and communications." At first blush, it seems...
Hollywood and Divine: A Cautious DreamWorks Asks Religious Leaders for Advice on Its Animated Epic, 'Prince of Egypt.'(Brief Article)
It was a strange phone call. Last fall, Abe Foxman, national director of the Anti-Defamation League, dialed Ralph Reed, the wunderkind of the Christian right. Foxman had an intriguing proposal: he wanted Reed to be a consultant on DreamWorks' animated...
Homework Doesn't Help
Every night, millions of parents and kids shed brood, sweat and tears over the kitchen table. Now some researchers say these dreaded lessons are generally pointless until middle school. There are as many the theories about why so many of America's...
In Defense of Pius XII; Blaming the Wartime Pope for Failing to Stop the Holocaust from the Vatican Is a Neat Bit of Revisionist History
Blaming the wartime pope for failing to stop the Holocaust from the Vatican is a neat bit of revisionist history. The voice of Pius's XII is a lonely voice in the silence and darkness enveloping Europe this Christmas.... He is about the only ruler left...
In the Time of Tolerance: When It Comes to Sex in This Nonjudgmental Age, Nobody Wants to Start Casting Stones
When it comes to sex in this nonjudgmental age, nobody wants to start casting stones But enough about the man Monica Lewinsky calls "the big he." How about us? Last week's polls show no slippage in the president's healthy approval ratings. That may...
It Ain't Necessarily So
If American education is as terrible as the critics claim, why is our economy so healthy? We should be more skeptical of the naysayers. As the parent of two children in an excellent American public elementary school--one that feeds a high school...
Mississippi's Spy Secrets: Long-Sealed Files Reveal How a Segregationist State Waged War on the Civil-Rights Movement
Long-sealed files reveal how a segregationist state waged war on the civil-rights movement The language is alarmist, the tone sinister. During Mississippi's dangerous "Freedom Summer" of 1964, the civil-rights movement was headquartered in a chaotic...
More Hype Than Bang; Think Japan Will Reform Its Banks? Think Again
Think Japan will reform its banks? Think again. Much like his Great-Great-grandfather, who saw doom approaching from his castle window, Tsunenari Tokugawa divines his nation's fate in the doings of foreigners. Merrill Lynch. Morgan Stanley. The hot...
Phil and Roger and Me: Nike's Knight Lands on Michael Moore's Skewer
How anxious is Nike about the imminent release of "The Big One," the wickedly funny new documentary made by "Roger and Me" writer-director Michael Moore? Very anxious, according to Moore. Shortly before the film premiered at the Sundance Film Festival...
Play 'Pelota'! as Opening Day Nears, Major-League Teams Sign Up More Players Than Ever from Latin America. They're Good, Eager - and Relatively Cheap
As opening day nears, major-league teams sign up more players than ever from Latin America. They're good, eager--and relatively cheap. Cuban baseball player Orlando (El Duque) Hernandez had a right to feel a bit dazed when he touched down on American...
Raised by Dr. Spock: Millions Turned to Him for Child-Rearing Guidance, but for His Own Family He Had No Easy Answers
Millions turned to him for child-rearing guidance, but for his own family he had no easy answers America loved Dr. Spock, and through him we came to love our children better. His best-selling baby book transformed child rearing in postwar America....
Return of the Rebel Belle: A New Novel from Dorothy Allison, Author of 'Bastard Our of Carolina.'('Cavedweller')
Her first year as a teacher, Molly Sinclair taught "Bastard Out of Carolina" to sophomores at Mt. Abram High School in Salem, Maine. The next year, 1995, a parent filed a complaint, Sinclair began getting crank calls and somebody smashed her car window...
Speaking Their Language
You've got the passport, the plane reservations and that swell color-coded map of downtown Moscow. But how are you going to get directions to the Bolshoi when you can't understand a word of Russian? If a three-month Berlitz course doesn't fit your...
The Rat Race Begins at 14: Stressed-Out Kids Aiming for Top Colleges Refuse to Slow Down
Stressed-out kids aiming for top colleges refuse to slow down The school day at New Trier High in Winnetka, Ill., runs from 8:10 a.m. to 3:20 p.m., but not many students settle for that wimpy schedule. The extra "early bird" science and music classes...
The Spoils of War: Pictures Looted by Nazis Hang in Top Museums. A Drive to Get Them Back Is Roiling the Art World
Pictures looted by Nazis hang in top museums. A drive to get them back is roiling the art world. Nick Goodman, 52, an art director in California, inherited an old desk from his father. Inside he found documents about his father's search for art stolen...
The Trouble with Willey
A woman with mixed motives and a complicated past, her credibility in question, Kathleen Willey is at odds with the president over sex and lies. Can she be believed? Round two: last week, after Kathleen Willey's story was aired on "60 Minutes," the...
The Tutor Age
It's an exploding market: millions of families are worried about the quality of their local schools. And a new breed of tutors is offering its services -- at home, in schools, in shopping-mall centers across the country. Even some beleaguered inner-city...
Watch Who You Follow; Worshiping Idols Can Be Risky to Your Wealth
The three basic human drives are said to be the needs for food, shelter and sex. When it comes to investing money, though, we Americans seem to be developing a fourth drive: idol worship. Instead of treating investing as what it is -- something difficult...
When Cool Goes Cold
Nike was marketing MVP. But with its image, brand and business under fire, a company and a CEO with a sense of mission are suddenly reeling. Phil Knight doesn't speak in public very often. And when you hear from him these days, he doesn't sound happy....
'Why Blame the Man?' - Women Are Standing by Clinton - for Now
Women are standing by Clinton for now. Washington was tuned to the wrong channel. In the capital they assumed Bill Clinton's fate rested with Kathleen Willey on "60 Minutes." But to understand why the president seems to be pulling a Travolta--stayin'...