Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 132, No. 37, September 14

A Lawyer's Loopholes
Ken Starr's case against Bill Clinton rests in part on the assumption that the president lied in his deposition in the Paula Jones case last January, when he denied an affair with Monica Lewinsky. Clinton now admits to the relationship, but still insists...
Are the Walls Closing In?
As Starr prepares to finish his report, a longtime Democratic friend of the president's lashes out--forcing Clinton to say, at last, 'I'm sorry' Dianne Feinstein didn't hold back. At a routine Capitol Hill luncheon for Senate Democrats last week, the...
Changing Channels
Rumors of the death of the networks may be greatly exaggerated, but some provocative entries by the upstart netlets this fall might land the Big Four on the critical list. There's a new cbs show called "L.A. Doctors," about four West Coast M.D.s who...
Global Capitalism, R.I.P.?
Much of the world simply doesn't have the values needed for free markets. We pretended otherwise. Now comes the reckoning. Tumbling world stock markets last week contained a large, though muffled, message: global capitalism--whose triumph once seemed...
'Here's Your Opportunity'
The market's chief bull takes on the downturn If the market is making you seasick, ask your druggist for a big bottle of Abby Joseph Cohen. Cohen is the Goldman Sachs strategist with the platinum record--and huge following--who's been issuing soothing...
Hugs Aren't Enough for This Bear
As bitter foes try to patch together a government, Russia abandons Western-style reform. Turns out they're not like us, after all. There are moments when history is etched not in the fine print of treaties, nor in conversations conducted behind closed...
In Baseball's Season of Redemption, Two Men Go after the Most Fabled Record in American Sports-61 Home Runs
Going ... going ... gone! kiss it goodbye! It's outtahere! The home run--no other event in sports elicits such a multitude of cries (except when fans run out of beer). Once upon a time, when Calvin Coolidge was president, Babe Ruth hit 60 homers in a...
Life in the Ostrich Years
Clinton's troubles are keeping him from pulling our heads out of the sand on emerging threats In the middle of the next century, what will Americans remember about the 1990s? Bill Clinton is likely to be seen as a sexier Nixon, disgraced and then probably...
Live from the Dorm Room
Video is cheap enough to buy, easy enough to use Writing home just isn't what it used to be. First e-mail pushed out paper and postage; now parents are having to gear up for a new way of communicating with their college kids: videoconferencing. This...
Living with the Tests
Why do certain black students succeed? Standardized tests aren't sa-tan's tools, but they make unending racial mischief. They fuel theories of race-based intellectual inferiority, and block admission of upwardly mobile blacks and Latinos to top universities....
Meditations of a Man with an Uncaged Mind after 50 Years, New Life for Thomas Merton's Work
On Oct. 4, 1948, harcourt brace published the spiritual autobiography of a young Roman Catholic convert, Thomas Merton. It captured readers like few books since Saint Augustine's "Confessions." In its first year alone, "The Seven Storey Mountain," which...
My Online Synagogue the Internet Draws People Together. but There's Still No Substitute for Human Contact
I am the rabbi of a cybersynagogue. in many ways what I do on the Internet is starkly different from the work I did when I was a pulpit rabbi. For one thing, this congregation is open 24 hours a day. If anyone has a pressing concern or question, all...
Online and Bummed Out
One study says the Internet can be alienating. There's this woman, let's call her Sandra, who lives in a certain city and has a sincere, loving nature and an adventuresome spirit, which is just about all I know about her. Oh, and she has a husband....
Say What? Preserving Endangered Languages
Marie Smith Jones seems an unlikely activist. But this 80-year-old woman is carrying the memories of the once flourishing Eyak, an Alaskan culture that began its journey toward extinction about 100 years ago. Smith Jones, who serves as chief of the 132-member...
See It Now, or Whenever
Netcasting delivers what you want when you want it. Soon after Daniel Paladini got word that Swissair Flight 111 had crashed, the computer manager at a Swiss investment company turned to the Internet to find out more about the accident. Like most workers...
Shattered Lives: The Faces of a Tragic Flight
At the United Nations, they called SwissAir flight 111 "the shuttle" because so many diplomatic employees used it to go back and forth between New York and Geneva. But the 229 passengers on the plane that crashed off the coast of Nova Scotia last week...
Smoke Was the First Sign of Trouble. Then, a Harrowing Half Hour Later, the Swissair Jet Crashed into the Sea, Killing All 229 on Board. What Happened?
Larry and Elsie Perry of Bayswater, Nova Scotia, were watching the news, as they do every night at 10, when they heard a low hum, followed by a muffled boom. Larry, in his La-Z-Boy, and Elsie, in the love seat, sat up and looked at each other. It sounded...
Smoothing Things Over
A new treatment for cellulite shows promise Dr. Gregory Latrenta was openly skeptical when a colleague told him about a machine that could reduce cellulite. "More hokeypokey," thought the New York plastic surgeon. But the lumpy fat deposits dimple the...
The Bottom of the Deck
In 'Rounders,' a great cast is dealt a losing hand Mike mcdermott (matt damon) is trying to live a straight life--job, girlfriend, law school. It sounds good on paper, but not even the love of a smart, pretty fellow student (Gretchen Mol) can compare...
The Itinerant Incendiary
How Khallid Muhammad tried to roil New York His name means warrior, and Khallid Muhammad has made it very clear that he relishes a good fight. First, he split with organizers planning a youth rally in Atlanta for the Labor Day weekend when they wouldn't...
The Shoes Keep on Dropping
Bad news slams the market for a second week, wiping out the year's gains. If you're still complacent about the U.S. stock market after last week, you must have a very strong stomach or a very weak mind. Or maybe both. We stockholders got a glimpse of...
The Strangest of Bedfellows
Thurgood Marshall fought for civil rights. J. Edgar Hoover fought communists. How the two titans joined forces. The first tentative steps in the minuet between Thurgood Marshall and J. Edgar Hoover were short and awkward. They came in 1956 when Dr....
Waiting in the Wings
If Chernomyrdin loses, two strong-minded men may have a shot at power. Both are volatile mavericks. Was there an alternative to Viktor Chernomyrdin as prime minister of Russia? Boris Berezovsky, the financial "oligarch" and political kingmaker, seemed...
We Don't Care If We Never Get Back
Great teams, big trades, luminous stars. As this season comes to a crescendo, it's clear there's never been a better year. "... when the world is puddle-wonderful ..." --e e cummings That is how the world has been since April, for baseball fans. Four...