Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 135, No. 2, January 10

A Family's Breakdown: Affluent Parents Allegedly Abandon a Disabled Son
The kindest explanation was that somebody snapped. The emotional burden of caring for a severely disabled child became too great, and after years of struggling with their son's handicaps, Dawn and Richard Kelso were suddenly unable to cope. But whatever...
Aids Crushes A Continent: Every Minute 11 People Worldwide Are Infected with HIV. Ten Are in Sub-Saharan Africa
Imagine 40 million orphans in sub-saharan Africa by the end of this decade, many of them organized into "kid armies." Does this grotesque recasting of "Lord of the Flies" in real life get your attention? Ron Dellums hopes so. Dellums, tall, slender,...
A Night to Remember
Waiting for the Lights to Go Out SPOKANE, WA: Sometimes it's tough--and expensive--to survive Robert Swanson insists he was never the kind of survivalist who actually wants the world to end. "I don't have the anger," he says. Even so, the massage...
A Scion Hits the Streets: Bush's New Plan to Catch McCain in New Hampshire
Candidate George W. Bush first touched down in New Hampshire last June on a jet he called Great Expectations. A fitting name: the Texas governor already had a commanding lead in local polls and more cash than a casino. The state's leading Republicans...
A War in the Corn
Michael Whouley is the Mr. Fix-It of Al Gore's presidential campaign. Last summer, when Bill Bradley's forces tried to overwhelm the Democrats' state convention in Massachusetts, it was Whouley who hurried to Springfield to beat back the challenge....
Bloody Attack on a Beatle: A Liverpool Man Is Charged with Stabbing George Harrison
By the time he apparently smashed a window to get into George Harrison's secluded mansion in the predawn hours of Dec. 30, Michael Abram had left a trail of warning signs. Abram, 33, had struggled with drug addiction since his 20s and spent two weeks...
Cyber-Santa's Sleigh Ride: Millions Spent Billions Online-But Not All Were Merry
If the e-commerce numbers that emerged last week are any guide, Internet execs should be quaffing the bubbly well into the new year. Online holiday sales tripled from 1998, and overall customer satisfaction nudged up slightly. "Consumers came out in...
How We Rang in 2000
They sat side by side, these men who had spent their professional lives pointing nuclear missiles at each other, inside the windowless room at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado. Officers of the U.S. Space Command and their Russian counterparts had...
In the Eye of 'The Hurricane': Off Screen, Denzel Washington Is Grounded. as Boxer Rubin Carter, He's a Force of Nature
Denzel Washington may make almost $10 million a movie, but he's not afraid to take a punch. When he took on the role of Rubin (Hurricane) Carter--the real-life middleweight contender imprisoned for 19 years for a murder he didn't commit--Washington...
I Wonder: What If My Friends Hadn't Run? as a Boy, I Once Used My Rifle to End a Fight. It Still Troubles Me to Think What Might Have Happened
When I was a boy, I loved watching Gene Autry and Roy Rogers movies and then acting out my fantasies, galloping around the yard on a stick horse and shooting at bad men with my cap gun. On my 9th birthday, when Dad asked, "What'll it be--a bike or...
Jamie Foxx Gets in the Game
In Oliver Stone's football saga, "Any Given Sunday," Jamie Foxx plays a third-string quarterback who gets his big break when the two men in front of him get injured. In real life, Foxx benefited from a similar stroke of someone else's bad luck. Stone...
Japan's Harsh Reality Check: A Country That Thought It Was Managing Change Was Trying-Vainly-To Avoid the Unavoidable
It was only a few years ago that the new century was being called "the Asian Century." Led by Japan, Asia would (we were told) dazzle with its own brand of efficient and humane capitalism. The new century could still belong to Asia--who can tell?--but...
Living the Self-Help Life: For This Devotee, Happiness Is a Good Seminar. How a Young Woman Became a Dream Customer for Gurus
Some people dabble in self-help. Kristen Kurowski is immersed in it. During afternoon breaks she stares silently at the lake outside her office, a relaxation trick she picked up at a recent seminar. Her bookshelves hold the work of Norman Vincent Peale...
Moscow's Man to Watch: Vladimir Putin Insists He's a Democrat. but His KGB Past Is Raising Questions Inside Russia and around the World
Two weeks ago, on the night before Russia's parliamentary elections, Prime Minister Vladimir Putin visited the headquarters of the FSB, one of the successor agencies to the KGB, at its building on what used to be called Dzerzhinsky Square. Feliks Dzerzhinsky...
Newsmakers
Just because a few actors narrowly missed out on having a millennium day baby, did they have to punish their kids with more of those bizarre Hollywood names? Don Johnson and his wife, Kelley, had a girl last week they named Atherton, after Kelley's...
Self-Help U.S.A
After all the build-up, the calendar has flipped and life moves on. But what kind of life will it be? Good? Excellent? Outstanding? Will this be a year for tapping your true potential? No less than the pope has declared 2000 to be a time for taking...
The Bug That Didn't Bite: Billions of Dollars Later, Y2K Is on the Run. the Lessons of a Millennial Computer Scare
Last week we were worrying about welcoming a new century in the dark. Now the biggest problem seems to be disposing of all that tuna fish we stocked up on. Our long anxiety that a computer breakdown would leave us powerless, thirsty and ATM-deprived...
The End of an Era: As Its First-Ever Elected President, Boris Yeltsin Presided over His Country's Transformation from Totalitarianism to Democracy. but Russia Today Is Beset by Economic Despair, Rampant Corruption and War. His Complicated Legacy-And the Nation's Tricky Road Ahead
Even at the end, his flair for the dramatic was undiminished. The world was counting down the hours to a new millennium. On Friday morning in Moscow, a gentle snow was falling and, like everywhere else in the world, celebrations large and small were...
The Future of Terror: On Guard: America Is the Dominant Nation Entering the New Century-And the Top Target for Extremists
In many countries, when police want to clear the streets of any dangerous characters, they "round up the usual suspects" and put them in jail. In the United States, the FBI engages in a more discreet practice known as knock-and-talk. At dawn last Thursday,...
Under the Gun: Shootings in a New York City Nightclub Land Rap Mogul Puffy Combs in Jail-And Rattle His Already Rocky World
It would hardly be a happy holiday tale. On the night after Christmas, trouble was stirring around rap mogul Sean (Puffy) Combs and his actress girlfriend Jennifer Lopez. The CEO of Bad Boy Entertainment was supposedly flashing wads of cash inside...
Why Y2K Won't Die: Glitch Watch<B>:</B> the Millennium Bug Didn't Cause the Digital Apocalypse Many Feared. but There Still May Be Big Headaches to Come
So it wasn't the end of the world. The specter of a worldwide digital meltdown began to evaporate as the new millennium dawned around the globe Friday night, leaving billions of people united in a collective shrug. So far, even those who weren't fearing...
Y2a-Ok!
Washington, D.C. A Capital Show: With an assist from scaffolding in place for a $10 million restoration project, the 555-foot-tall Washington Monument glowed like a giant sparkler, gleaming in the Reflecting Pool and across the skyline New York...
Yeah, Sure You Will. Whatever
Want the secret to New Year's resolution success? Aim low. Resolve to keep wearing socks. For the more ambitious, here's a pick-me-up for the moment defeat arrives: see all these famous people? They'll struggle just as mightily as the rest of us. ...