Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 13

A Ph.D. Hits the Road: Even in a Tight Job Market, Not All Fields Prosper
Byline: Daniel McGinn For more than a decade, Pleun Bouricius spent summers prepping for classes as a doctoral student and lecturer at Harvard University. But last August, after a fruitless, four-year search for a university teaching job, she began...
A Question of 'Responsibility': Why Didn't the Man Who Wants to Redeem the Boomers Tell Us about His Own Boomer Baggage?
Byline: Jonathan Alter When George W. Bush won re-election as governor in 1998, the drumbeat began. He should be president, many Republicans immediately concluded. He was just the man to cleanse the Oval Office. Bush himself saw significance in...
A Reason for His Rhymes: The Real Dr. Seuss Wanted Children to Love Reading Books
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz He was not a doctor (the pen name was adopted when he wrote for the humor magazine Judge in the late 1920s). And he had no children. "You make 'em; I amuse them," he once said. But nearly a decade after his death at the...
A Tarnished Crown: Burger King's Problems Lead to Management Unrest
Byline: Flynn McRoberts Hold the pickles, hold the lettuce, hold the corporate chaos. Burger King executives wish they could. The fast-food giant that once urged consumers to "have it your way" can't seem to get anything to go its way these days....
A Tragic Wrong Turn: Amid a Fierce Storm, a Pilot Makes a Mistake
Byline: Mark Hosenball and Brook Larmer From the moment Singapore Airlines Flight SQ006 taxied away from the gate at Taiwan's Chiang Kai-shek Airport last Tuesday night, Sally Walker felt uneasy. Clutching the armrests of seat 58A, the 46-year-old...
A War over Lyme Disease: The Debate about How to Treat This Illness Has Patients Raging-And Doctors Losing Their Licenses
Byline: David France A few days before Halloween, a popular Long Island, N.Y., Lyme-disease specialist named Joseph Burrascano entered a state Health Department hearing room where one of medicine's rancorous academic disputes will be played out:...
Beyond Cute: Pepsi's Hallie Eisenberg Goes for the Hard Stuff
Byline: Marc Peyser Most of the time, people call her the Pepsi Girl. It happens at Hollywood openings. "We were sitting at the premiere of 'The Insider.' Al Pacino is sitting over there, and Russell Crowe is in that corner," says her mother, Amy....
Bigger, Stronger, Faster: Culpepper Is a New Kind of Quarterback: Jumbo-Size
Byline: Mark Starr and Allison Samuels One by one, they've left the field. First John Elway in a blaze of Super Bowl glory, then Steve Young in a haze of concussions and, finally, Dan Marino with every passing record but no ring. When Troy Aikman...
Big Pictures, Big Names: Children's Book Publishers Are Looking to the Stars
Byline: Karen Springen Consider this celebrity roll call: Jamie Lee Curtis, Katie Couric, John Lithgow, Debbie Allen, Carly Simon, Julie Andrews Edwards, Laura Schlessinger, Rosanne Cash, Deloris Jordan (Michael's mom). The guest list at a Hollywood...
Bush's Secret Strategy: How the Governor and His Team Kept Questions at Bay
Byline: Michael Isikoff George W. Bush long has tried to avoid questions about the days when, as he puts it, "I was young and irresponsible." Before last week one of his closest shaves came in September 1996, when he was called for jury duty in...
Crime and Punishment: Yes, the Inmate Population Is Growing-But That Has Given Us Safer Streets. A Texas Scholar Argues for Tough Sentences in Prisons Better Designed to Rehabilitate
Byline: Morgan Reynolds The point seems obvious to most Americans: punishment reduces crime. Yes, prison takes a toll on the family the convict leaves behind. But crime also takes a toll on its victims and society at large. And crime rates have...
Cyberscope
Byline: Michael E. Ryan and Victoria Scanlan Stefanakos HOT PROPERTY Nintendo's Latest Zelda Adventure Though nearly lost in the hype surrounding Sony's PlayStation 2 launch, Nintendo recently unveiled the latest game in its popular Zelda series....
Democracy in America: It Succeeds Because Politics Is Just One of Many Outlets for Its Passions and Ambitions
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson Alexis de Tocqueville (1805-1859) wouldn't have been surprised by the campaign's bitterness, with one candidate (Gore) cast as a liar and the other (Bush) as an imbecile. Tocqueville would have had an interesting explanation...
'Emotions Have Grown High': Israel's Senior Statesman on His Meeting with Arafat-And the Way Back to the Peace Talks
Byline: Lally Weymouth On the fifth anniversary of the death of prime minister Yitzhak Rabin, it was his colleague Shimon Peres, also a former prime minister, who came to the rescue of the peace process they jointly created in Oslo back in 1993....
Focus on Money
INVESTMENTS Looking to Get a Righteous Return By Doing Right Maybe Ralph Nader's next career should be as a mutual-fund manager. Roughly one in eight investors mulls ethics considerations, like environmental protection and tobacco and weapon production,...
G'bye Truffles, Hello Ribs: They May Never Get Three Stars Again, but Some Top Chefs Are Finding Joy in Clam Shacks and Barbecue
Byline: Jerry Adler and Tara Weingarten Poor Alain Ducasse. After a stumbling start at his eponymous New York showcase, the world's most honored French chef last week won the three stars (out of four) from The New York Times that are the minimum...
Growing a Green Plant: In His Most Expensive Gamble to Date, Bill Ford Is Spending $2 Billion to Build a Better Car Factory
Byline: Keith Naughton In its day, Henry Ford's River Rouge manufacturing complex was a showcase of the Industrial Revolution. Huge freighters bearing freshly mined iron ore docked at one end of the mile-long warren of foundries and factories, while...
Hearing with Your Third Ear: This Campaign Has Reflected, and Advanced, the Ongoing Revision of Political Categories
Byline: George F. Will The period for a new election of a citizen to administer the executive government of the United States being not far distant... --The opening words of President Washington's farewell address, 1796 Time was, that is how...
Hot and Steamy in the Valley: Perks: A Company Sauna Gives New Meaning to 'Full Disclosure'
Byline: Brad Stone Talking about pricey employee perks in Silicon Valley these days is a bit like telling jokes at a hanging. With dot-coms going bust left and right, it's tasteless. It's also counterproductive, since today's typically skittish...
Japan Tries to Loosen Up: 'Casual Fridays' Have Salarymen Chasing Cheap Chic
Byline: Kay Itoi Miki and Takashi Kanamoto are on a mission: to complete their fall wardrobe. The couple--he's an engineer, she's a housewife--head for Harajuku, one of Tokyo's trendiest shopping districts. But instead of browsing through the neighborhood's...
Learning the Score: Thanks to a Growing Consumer Movement, Borrowers Will Soon Be Able to Get Once Secret Information on Their Credit Ranking
Byline: Linda Stern If you have a financial life, you have a grade, and everybody knows it but you. For years the credit-reporting industry has been reducing consumers' credit reports to numerical scores, and lenders have been using these scores...
Living la Vida Loaded: That Ricky Just Won't Slow Down. an Effervescent New Album Finds the Hardest-Working Hip Shaker in Show Business Still Giving It His All
Byline: Lorraine Ali It's no fun being a one-hit wonder. just ask Starland Vocal Band, Kajagoogoo or Ugly Kid Joe--if you can find them. That's why last year's Latin rock poster boy Ricky Martin is working extra hard to establish himself as more...
Meet Nader's Traders: How 'Vote Swapping' Web Sites Could Change Politics
Byline: Karen Breslau Cindy Layne wants Al Gore to win. That, says the Austin, Texas, financial consultant, is why she's voting for Ralph Nader. Her Gore "vote" will be cast some 1,700 miles away, in a suburb of Portland, Ore., by Charlie Levenson,...
Newsmakers
Byline: Alisha Davis The Grandest Master Falls At the outset of last week's world chess championships, Garry Kasparov made typically egotistical proclamations that the world would be astounded by his level of play. And he was right. His 15-year...
Periscope
Byline: Bret Begun, Lucy Howard, Susannah Meadows and Katherine Stroup EXCLUSIVE Guggenheim: Flying Down to Rio New York's Guggenheim Museum has already taken the notion of global franchises farther than any other American palace of culture, with...
Perspectives
"I made some mistakes. I occasionally drank too much, and I did that night." George W. Bush, admitting his 1976 arrest for driving under the influence "Here is a man that I have never heard anybody criticize once for improper conduct as governor,...
Right, Wrong and the White House: From JFK to Clinton, Moral Leadership Is More Complex Than It Seems. Reflections on Two Presidents and Our Children
Byline: Robert Coles In many homes across the south in the civil-rights years of the 1960s, an American president figured constantly, his portrait in a place of honor, often near (and, reverentially, above) photographs of family members: John F....
Seeing the Light of Day: A New Cassatt Show Is an Understated Sensation
Byline: Peter Plagens In today's art world--as in today's Hollywood--subtlety and delicacy aren't likely to get you very far. Big video projections and grungy installation artworks are the contemporary art-gallery equivalents of the movies' car-chase...
Shedding the Weight of My Dad's Obsession: For Years My Figure Was the Target of My Father's Anger. I've Finally Come to Accept My Size and Myself
Byline: Linda Lee Andujar Instead of selling the camp fire candy, I ate it. Eight boxes of it. Each Bluebird in our fourth-grade troop was assigned 12 boxes of chocolate candy to sell for a dollar a box. I sold four boxes to my family and then ran...
Strange Days in Utah: Why Did a Mormon Sect Take Its Kids out of School?
Byline: Andrew Murr Situated in the remote desert along the Utah-Arizona border, the twin towns of Colorado City, Ariz., and Hildale, Utah, are the longtime redoubt of a breakaway Mormon sect that still practices polygamy 110 years after it was...
$ $ $ $ TACTICS: Some Pots of Savings Are Too Small, Others Are Too Large. Here's How to Handle Either One
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn Q: I turned 50 in 1998 and finally opened an IRA. My insurance agent recommended an equity-indexed tax-deferred annuity--American Eagle. It's tied to Standard & Poor's 500-stock index, except that my gain can't fall...
The Anatomy of an E-Shopper: Sociology: A New Study Finds Internet Users Worry More about Big Business Than Big Brother
Byline: Yuval Rosenberg Lisa Garberg is a convert. The 40-year-old human-resources worker with the Shoreline, Wash., public-school system first ventured online three years ago with an e-mail account at work. Now she boasts of buying her loved ones...
The Father of Late Night: The Man Who Created the TV-Talk-Show Format We Go to Sleep with and Led the Way for Johnny, Dave and Jay
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan Long before Ed McMahon ever whooped "Heeeeeeeere's Johnny!" there was Steve Allen. Allen invented the whole late-night-TV shtik--he opened with a monologue and schmoozed with his bandleader; he loped up into the studio...
The Grinch's Gatekeeper: Audrey Geisel Has a Firm Hold on the Tiller of Her Late Husband's Estate, but She Let Dr. Seuss's Grouchy Grinch Have a Life on the Screen
Byline: John Horn Producer Brian Grazer had spent more than two fruitless years pursuing movie rights to "How the Grinch Stole Christmas!" and when he finally made his case to author Dr. Seuss's widow, Audrey Geisel, he quickly realized she was...
The Odd Couple: Napster's Deal with Bertelsmann Is a Huge Shift in the War over Online Music
Byline: Brad Stone During a critical point in their eight-week-long secret negotiations, Hank Barry and Andreas Schmidt went to the zoo. The CEO of Napster and the exec at Bertelsmann, one of the world's biggest media conglomerates, were decompressing...
The Prison Paradox: While America Puts More and More Young Blacks and Hispanics in Jail, the Neighborhoods They Leave Behind Grow Even More Unstable. Inside the Tangled Culture of the Prison Generation-And What Can Be Done to Try to Reclaim Lost Lives
Byline: Ellis Cose Growing up, she never much thought of the law, but of late she has thought of little else. An attractive, well-coifed woman of 44 given to conservative suits and sweeping statements, Toylean Johnson has immersed herself in the...
The Silence of the Woods: Humans' Closest Relatives Are Fighting Extinction
Byline: Erika Check The first sign that something is very wrong with this forest is the silence. In the woods of eastern Cote d'Ivoire and western Ghana, where insects once buzzed, birds cackled and monkeys howled, "you don't hear anything. It's...
They're Flying High: An American and Two Russians Take Space Station 'Alpha' on a Four-Month Shakedown Cruise. Is the $90 Billion Price Tag Worth It?
Byline: Thomas Hayden The launch was flawless; the docking went without a hitch. Even the chorus of cheers from the crowd of hundreds at mission control in Star City, near Moscow, seemed perfectly choreographed last week. But as Bill Shepherd, Yuri...
Turning Up the Heat: The First Hopeful Sign in Weeks-The Promise of a Ceasefire-Falls Victim to a Terror Bombing in Jerusalem. the Pressure on Arafat Builds
Byline: Dan Ephron For the enemies of peace, the bombing was timed perfectly. Last Thursday, minutes before Israeli and Palestinian leaders were to announce a halt to six weeks of skirmishes, a car exploded near Jerusalem's crowded outdoor produce...
Unhappy Hour: November Surprise: An Old Drunken-Driving Case Roils George W. Bush's Campaign in the Final Days of a Razor-Thin Race. but Who Leaked It?
Byline: Howard Fineman, Mark Hosenball and Michael Isikoff The rally in the Chicago suburb had been a stunner, maybe his best of the season: 10,000 supporters cheering for George W. Bush on a sunny quadrangle at the College of DuPage in Illinois,...
What If They Both Win? the Delicate Constitutional Role of the Electoral College
Byline: Yuval Rosenberg The framers of the Constitution knew the system wasn't perfect. In deciding the thorny question of how to elect a president, they were eager to strengthen state sovereignty and hesitant about letting popular will reign free....
When E Stands for Eek: E-Publishing: When the First Awards for E-Books Were Announced, Most of the Winners Were. Hardcovers?
Byline: Malcolm Jones If you want a progress report on the current fortunes of the e-book, you could do no better than the International eBook Awards, which were announced Oct. 20 at the Frankfurt Book Fair. And the winners were--drumroll, please--on...