Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 12

A Dishy Deal for General Motors: GM's Tax Experts Engineer a Great New Model to Save Billions in Taxes on the DirecTV Sale
Zero is a big number at General Motors these days. No, I'm not talking about GM's zero-interest car loans, the marketing breakthrough that the rest of the industry followed, sending October auto sales to record levels. Rather, I'm talking about the...
A Little Space Music: Digital Radio Delivered by Satellite Finally Comes Online for Subscribers Nationwide. It Sounds Terrific. but Is America Ready to Rock and Roll
What Kind Of music do you like?" asks Jeff Snyder, systems vice president of XM Radio. I hesitate before answering. Snyder is threading a big maroon Cadillac through Washington, D.C., traffic while simultaneously showing off a cute piece of Sony hardware....
Antiterror, Inc. Israel: Already Experienced in Security and Crisis Management, Tech Firms Have Services to Export
From his Jerusalem office, Fitz Haney looks out on a city that used to teem with foreign business people. American investment in Israel's once booming technology sector is down by half over the past year. Fallout from the intifada? Not really, says...
Bush's New War Room: Tired of Losing the Propaganda Battle, a 'Rapid Response' White House Is Now Fighting Bin Laden Word for Word
This time, the White House was ready. Last Saturday morning, Osama bin Laden released a videotaped message denouncing the United States and the "unjust, ferocious campaign" against Afghanistan. The tape was sent to Al Jazeera, the independent Arab...
Coming to an in Box near You: Dancing Ads
MEDIA All the Bits That Fit The New York Times may be a city paper, but the world reads it--now more than ever. Last week the newspaper launched its new "electronic edition" which, for a fee, allows you to download over the Internet an exact replica...
Facing A Long, Cold War: The White House Is Casting Its Lot with the Northern Alliance. but Hopes for a Quick Victory Are Fading Fast
Commander Rakhmad Gol is enjoying himself. For the past six years he's been fighting a frustrating war against the Taliban, usually enduring defeat, sometimes making small but costly gains of territory. Now he's watching raptly as U.S. warplanes bomb...
Generation 9-11: The Kids Who Grew Up with Peace and Prosperity Are Facing Their Defining Moment
It was a sleepy, gray afternoon--a challenge to any professor. And for the first few minutes of class last week, University of Michigan sociologist David Schoem had some trouble rousing the 18 freshmen in his seminar on "Democracy and Diversity." One...
Hit the Road, Jacques: Fed Up with the Automaker's Morale Problems and Weak Results, Bill Ford Ousts the CEO and Takes Charge
Bill Ford began preparing for the change nearly a month ago. Ford Motor Co. had been floundering. Its brand name had been sullied by the Firestone scandal. Its vehicle-quality rankings had plummeted. And dealers and employees had become fed up with...
How Little We Really Know: The Anthrax Crisis Has Defied All Expectations. What Lessons Have We Learned, and How Can We Apply Them?
What a difference a month makes. When a tabloid photo editor died of pulmonary anthrax in early October, not even the tabloids conjured a terrorist plot. And when it turned out there was a terrorist plot, experts assumed that the risk to most people...
'I Don't See Any Way of Winning': Surprisingly, Lyndon Johnson Never Thought We Could Prevail in Vietnam. an Exclusive Excerpt from His Secret Tapes
As George W. Bush launches America's war on terrorism, we are watching a great turn of the historical wheel from the start of our last momentous war--in 1965, when Lyndon Johnson took us into the catastrophe of Vietnam. "We learned some very important...
Islam, Arabic and Afghanistan 101: At UCLA, a National Emergency Means More Opportunities to Teach
The emergency management Team at UCLA normally convenes to deal with earthquakes. But at 10 a.m. on September 11 it met to handle an entirely different emergency. Though the campus of 60,000 people appeared to be in no physical danger after the East...
Mail Call: Readers Weigh in on the War in Afghanistan, Women in the Military and the Future of Education
Like untold millions of my fellow Americans, I gave scant attention to our military before the events of September 11. Now, as we engage in what is certain to be a difficult and harrowing ground war in Afghanistan, it's gratifying to know we have such...
Newsmakers
Hollywood in Hiding In the mood for celeb spotting at Hollywood hot spots? These days it's easier finding stars in L.A.'s smoggy skies. The terrorist threat has famous folks running for cover--or the nearest gas-mask purveyor. Jennifer Aniston backed...
Now It's Nintendo's Turn: The New Box from the Mario Gang Finally Arrives
Last, but certainly not least, Nintendo's Gamecube console arrives in stores on Nov. 18, three days after Microsoft's Xbox and more than a year after Sony's PlayStation 2. It hasn't been an easy gestation and birth. The Gamecube's release date slipped...
Oil Prices: A War Casualty? the Experts Say Supplies Are Safe, but the Longer the Afghan Fight, the Greater the Risk
Finding someone who worries about America's oil supplies today is as hard as finding Osama bin Laden. We keep pumping gasoline into our SUVs as if oil and war, like oil and water, never mix. Yet we're fighting in a part of the world where a misstep...
Periscope
THE INVESTIGATION New Links in the bin Laden Money Chain When the Bush administration announced its campaign to cut off terrorist funding, investigators quickly turned their attention to a network of Islamic financial companies called Al Taqwa ("Fear...
Perspectives
Publisher correction: 11 Dec 2001 On our Nov. 12 Perspective page, we quoted U.S. Rep. Greg Ganske and failed to identify him properly; he is from Iowa. _____________________________________________________________________ "The enemy won't rest during...
Princess of Soul: Until She Wears Aretha's Crown, Angie Stone Is Happy Just to Sing
Angie Stone has always been slightly ahead of the curve. In the 1980s, when many Americans were still grooving to the Gap band, the singer formed an all-girl hip-hop trio. By the time Lil' Kim was busting her first rhymes, Stone was mixing vintage...
Priority: Pakistan's Nukes: If Taliban Sympathizers Overthrow Pervez Musharraf's Regime, U.S. Marines Are Standing by to Move In
The 2,200 troops of the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit are cooped up on the assault ship USS Peleliu, presumably itching for action. If they ever go ashore, it's as likely to be in Pakistan as Afghanistan. Given serious trouble in Pakistan--if, say,...
Remembrance of Sites Past: The Wayback Machine Holds the History of the Web
Once upon a time on the web, novelty abounded. And to be honest, it didn't take much to impress somebody. In the mid-'90s thousands of surfers were transfixed by the sight (site?) of a coffee machine in a faculty room at Cambridge University--word...
The End of Comedy as We Know It? I Know How Much We Need to Laugh. the Problem Is, My Old Way of Writing Jokes Won't Cut It Anymore
After the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon two months ago, television comedy immediately and understandably went dark. Six days later, on his first show after the attacks, late-night host Craig Kilborn pleaded with his audience...
The Waning of 'Terror Chic': Kathleen Soliah, A.K.A. Sara Jane Olson, Says She Wants but Cannot Receive a Fair Trial. Oh?
Radiating ripples from September 11 washed over a Los Angeles courtroom last week when an American pleaded guilty to terrorism. She was charged with attempting, 26 years ago, to kill Los Angeles police officers by attaching pipe bombs to two patrol...
'They Know I'm about Something': After Decades of Disrespect and Worse, ROTC Has Become Cool Again
Growing up in a poor Los Angeles neighborhood that still shows scars from the 1992 riots, David Ramirez watched friends wind up in juvie, or worse, after getting involved in theft and other small-time crimes. He knew he was headed in the same direction...
Time to Save 'Just in Time': Unless We Wise Up about Border Inspections, America's Economy Could Completely Stall
The war is going badly. Not the war in Afghanistan. Unlike some commentators--who must have their own satellite reconnaissance--I don't see how one can make definitive judgments about a military campaign that is barely a month old. But it is clear...
Turning John Jay into Terrorism U: After September 11, Even the School the Cops Attended Felt out of Date
When college recruitment fairs resumed following September 11, Alan Weidenfeld, an admissions counselor for John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City, found that his information table wasn't attracting the usual handful of prospective students....
Up from the Ashes: Rarely Have So Many Had So Much Invested in the Shape and Outcome of an Architectural Project. What's Next for the World Trade Center Site?
In a packed midtown-Manhattan hall one evening last week, 400 architects and design buffs got together to talk about the future of the New York City skyline. Since September 11 dozens of similar forums and meetings have taken place all over the city,...
'We Are in a War Here': In an Exclusive Interview, Sharon on Arafat, Bin Laden and Bush
Late last week, Israeli prime Minister Ariel Sharon canceled a visit planned for this week to the United States. He said that he would stay at home to oversee the withdrawal of Israeli troops from areas that Israel had previously turned over to the...
'We'll Move Forward': On the Day He Ended His Four-Year Battle with the Federal Government, Bill Gates Shared His Thoughts with NEWSWEEK
NEWSWEEK: What was the turning point in winning a settlement? GATES: The broad set of issues that [the DOJ] felt needed to be addressed had been the same throughout the discussion. The key was getting the language in place. That's when the process...
What Was That about? after a Bruising Four Years, the Feds Go Easy on Microsoft
The case was supposed to be two well-matched competitors--the United States government and Microsoft, Washington v. Washington--in the mightiest legal clash of the two centuries it straddled. Its outcome was going to determine the rules of the road...
Who Killed Kathy Nguyen? as Anthrax Claimed Another Victim, the Feds Struggled to Crack the Case and Assess Threats from Canada to California. Behind the Battle Inside the FBI
The doctors in the Intensive Care Unit at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York see a lot of very sick patients, but there was something particularly ominous about the bloody fluid that was fast filling the woman's chest cavity. She had come to the emergency...