Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from February 11

Analyzing the 'Axis of Evil': Could Rogue Nations Give Doomsday Arms to Terrorists? Here's How They Stack Up
Byline: John Barry and Russell Watson Rhetoric aside, "axis of evil" doesn't mean much. Iraq and Iran are bitter enemies--they fought each other in the bloodiest war of the 1980s--and North Korea has little in common with either of them. Though...
A New Capitol Clash: Enron Continues to Roil Washington. Next Up: A Constitutional Showdown
Byline: Howard Fineman and Michael Isikoff For security reasons, George W. Bush and Dick Cheney are not supposed to spend much time together. But they made an exception last Tuesday afternoon for a hoary ritual of life in the capital: the briefing...
An Excess of Riches: Since September 11, the Red Cross Has Had More Cash Than It Knows What to Do with. Just Ask the Limo Drivers
Byline: Steven Brill An unlikely group of men has been lining up lately at a Red Cross center in lower Manhattan to make appointments to seek September 11 disaster relief. They're drivers of the luxury sedans that ferry heavy hitters around town....
Another Barrier Shattered: Readers Respond to Our Cover on the Rise of Three African-American CEOs with Praise and Concern
I'm a retired military man and a small business owner, and after reading your Jan. 28 cover story, "The New Black Power," I'm glad that someone has written about what needs to be understood by all black men in America. I will spread the word to everyone...
A Reporter under the Gun: Bravely Following Terrorism's Trail, Reporter Daniel Pearl Was Kidnapped in Karachi Last Week. Inside the Efforts to Prevent a Casualty of War
Byline: Evan Thomas How dangerous is Karachi? In Pakistan's teeming port city (population: 15 million), the preferred mode of hit men is the motorcycle, the better to gun down targets stuck in the city's eternal traffic jam and then make a quick...
A Sad Primer in Hypocrisy: Since 1978, Useless Farm Subsidies Have Cost $300 Billion. Now We're Going to Expand Them
Byline: Robert. J. Samuelson This being federal budget season, we'll hear stern lectures from the White House and congressional leaders of both parties about the need to return to surpluses and to maintain "fiscal discipline." You should greet these...
A Stritch in Time: She Sings, She Dances and, Best of All, She Serves Great Dish. after an Amazing Career in the Theater, Broadway's Feisty First Lady Is Back Onstage with the One-Woman Story of Her Life. She's Still Here, All Right. and She's Better Than Ever
Byline: Marc Peyser It's not for nothing that Liz Smith describes her friend Elaine Stritch as "divinely difficult." "If being difficult is part of being true to yourself, then she's got a point," says Stritch. "Other than that, f--k her." Oh, my....
Betting Big on Lousy Stocks: Short Sellers Figured out Early on That Enron's Stock Would Fall. Now Everyone Wants to Know Their Tricks
Byline: Daniel McGinn When Jim Chanos and his friends go on spring break, there's no time for golf. Or the beach. Or fun of any kind-- unless your idea of a good time is sitting in a conference room talking about lousy investments. Each February,...
Bin Laden's Twisted Mission: A Bloody Misinterpretation of the Qur'an's Call to Arms
Byline: Christopher Dickey When Osama bin Laden proclaimed his "Jihad against Crusaders and Jews" in 1998, he knew he was on shaky religious ground. This was his declaration of "Holy War" to justify bombing U.S. embassies in Africa a few months...
Don't 'Protect' Me; Give Me Your Respect: Growing Up with a Gay Father Wasn't Easy-But Only Because Our Society Doesn't Accept Families like Mine
Byline: Abigail Garner To me, the seemingly benign question, "What do you do?" is anything but small talk. The stranger sitting next to me on a recent flight to southern California asked me that very question. I could have made up an answer,...
Fears in the 'Un-America': Europe Doesn't like What It's Hearing. as Bush Turns Up the Heat, Our Transatlantic Allies Grow Uneasy with the Us-vs.-Them Rhetoric
Byline: Christopher Dickey The Statue Of Liberty once looked out over the rooftops of Paris. "Liberty Enlightening the World," as the sculptor called it, was assembled in 1883 a short walk from the Champs-Elysees, then shipped to New York. It was...
If You Want to Know A Secret. the Producers of the Opening Ceremonies Go to Extremes to Keep Them a Surprise
Byline: John Horn When 8-year-old Charlie Fratto was cast last fall as one of the 4,000 performers in this Friday's opening ceremonies, the young dancer had never before seen a second of the Olympic Games. Nor had he ever taken a confidentiality...
In the Beginning, There Were the Holy Books: The Bible and the Qur'an Both Reveal the Word of God. Both Speak of Prophets, Redemption, Heaven and Hell. So Why the Violence? Searching the Sacred Texts for Answers
Publisher Correction: 2/21/02 Clarification In our Feb. 11 cover story, "The Bible and the Qur'an," we say that Terah, the father of Abraham, is not mentioned in the Bible. In fact, he is referred to in the Book of Genesis, but his story is not told....
My Own Private Enron: What Kind of Investor Stands by Doing Absolutely Nothing While a Once Hot Stock Totally Tanks? One Who Gets Emotionally Involved. like Me
Byline: Allan Sloan Yes, that's really my picture. it was taken in 1957, when I celebrated my bar mitzvah. Don't worry, NEWSWEEK isn't turning into my personal photo album. It's just that this is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for me to tell a...
Newsmakers
Byline: Jeff Giles, John Horn and David Gates Licensed to Kill Mike Myers thought he was the Man With the Golden Pun, but MGM has forced him to scrap the satirical title and the advertisements for his upcoming movie, "Austin Powers in Goldmember."...
No Translation Needed: Three Foreign Film Gems, Two Oscar-Bound, Heat Up an Otherwise Lukewarm Midwinter at the Movies
Byline: David Ansen Really, you do have options other than hack teen-hormone movies like "Slackers." Here are the best from overseas. The Danish and Italian films are their countries' entries in the Oscar derby, a big tight race that includes such...
Periscope
Byline: Michael Isikoff and Roy Gutman; Julie Scelfo and Joseph Contreras; Pat Wingert; Karen Springen; Mary Carmichael; Susannah Meadows; Brian Braiker INTELLIGENCE Overstatements in the State of the Union? As President Bush was preparing to...
Perspectives
"States likes these--and their terrorist allies--constitute an axis of evil, arming to threaten the peace of this world." President George W. Bush, in his State of the Union address, on potential threats from Iraq, Iran and North Korea "Little Bush's...
Powell's New War: Bush's Tough Talk about the 'Axis of Evil' Just Made Colin Powell's Hard Job a Lot Harder
Byline: Michael Hirsh and Roy Gutman As George W. Bush raised the stakes in his war on terror last week--pitting America against an "axis of evil"--one member of his administration knew that the first thing he had to worry about was unrest among...
Soft Money, Odd Thinking: If McCain-Feingold Were Already Law, Enron's Executives Could Have Given More to Legislators
Byline: George F. Will Rep. Richard Gephardt set a winter indoor record for audacious arguing when he wrung this lesson from the Enron debacle: "The real scandal here may not be what the administration did to help Enron, but what it avoided doing...
'Terrorist Cells All Over': The Philippines Is a Next Front in the Terror War. but for U.S. Special Forces There, the Clock Is Ticking
Byline: Lally Weymouth President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo of the Philippines caused a stir last month by inviting American Special Forces to her country to fight the Muslim terrorist group known as Abu Sayyaf ("Bearer of the Sword"). Left-wing Filipinos...
The New Place to Be Seen: This Year, Davos Became an Off-Broadway Extravaganza
Byline: Andrew Nagorski Davos in New York had all the hype, glitter, celebrity-watching and posturing that the World Economic Forum, now into its fourth decade, is justifiably famous for--times two. The decision to move the intimate annual gathering...
The Teflon Global Economy: Globalization Is Going Just Fine, but It Coulduse a Healthy Dose of American Leadership
Byline: Fareed Zakaria This year I hopped onto the subway to get to the World Economic Forum. It's not quite the same as flying to Switzerland, but Davos-at-the-Waldorf has its charms--worse scenery but better food. In one important respect, however,...
Who to Watch: Michelle Kwan May Be the Most Recognizable Face at the Salt Lake City Olympics. but If Ladies' Figure Skating Is Not Your Thing, How about Stunt Skiing, Suicidal Snowboarding or the Best Hockey on Earth? Here's a Look at Some Other Stars
Byline: Debra Rosenberg; Devin Gordon; Mark Starr Team USA Women's Hockey When women's ice hockey made its Olympic debut in Nagano four years ago, Team USA was an underdog. In a dramatic final match, the Americans upset archrival Canada to win...