Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 129, No. 22, June 2

Bayou Brawl
A rollicking partisan battle over an allegedly stolen U.S. Senate seat is roiling Louisiana--and the Beltway MARY LANDRIEU AND MARC MORIAL are political kin: neighbors who attended integrated Catholic schools in New Orleans, children of pro-civilrights...
Business Beautiful: CNBC's Bartiromo Makes Financial News Fun
CNBC's Bartiromo makes financial news fun AS MARIA BARTIROMO strides across the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, the normally frenetic male traders stop and take note. "How ya doin', Maria?" "Maria, over here," they call. One guy beckons: "Hey,...
But Nary a Trust to Bust: What's Behind the Feds' Surprisingly Different Reactions to the Boeing and Staples Mergers
What's behind the Feds' surprisingly different reactions to the Boeing and Staples mergers ROBERT PITOFSKY IS NO TEDDY Roosevelt, though he'd like to be. Curly-haired and a bit pudgy, the chairman of the Federal Trade Commission has the absent air...
Converted to Country: These Young Bands Are Going Back to the Basics
WHEN RICHARD Buckner walked stage at a New York club one night in early 1996 he seemed to have stepped straight out of some smoky, coal-lined hole in the Appalachians. Big-boned and broadshouldered, with his black hair tucked behind his ears and a...
Fighting the Next War
A former top female Pentagon official on how to head off future sex scandals. KELLY FLINN MAY BE packing her bags in Minot, N.D, but the military can't really leave her behind: it must answer the questions about women in the ranks that her case...
Get Ready to Take a Back Seat to a Circuit Board
AT THE 1939 World's Fair in New York, a short film called "To New Horizons" told viewers that the future would arrive by 1960. With it would come high-rise cities, electricity in rural areas and the extinction of road congestion and traffic accidents....
'Head Cutters' at War: Exclusive: A Visit to the Secret Hideout of Latin America's Most Notorious Death-Squad Leader
Exclusive: A visit to the secret hideout of Latin America's most notorious death-squad leader ON A SULTRY SPRING MORNING IN rural Colombia, the mountaintop sanctuary of Carlos Castano is bustling with preparations for battle. Four dozen young recruits...
Hopeful in Tijuana
A booming medical bazaar offers new lures A booming bazaar for dubious cures: A patient and his wife at the Oasis Hospital, a traffic jam at the border WHEN DOCTORS IN LOS ANGELEStold Pat Paulsen they couldn't cure his colon cancer, he did at...
In the Time of the Tabs
No wars? No news? No problem! Let's just entertain ourselves into a celebrity stupor. DURING WORLD WAll II, GEN. Dwight D. Eisenhower, a married man, fraternized with Kay Summersby, his army driver. As the rumors spread widely, Ike, who had a few...
Martina Redux
Can this cheeky 16-year-old champion stay on top of the tennis world? GETTING TO HER PRACTICE court is no longer an easy task for Martina Hingis. On this spring afternoon in Hilton Head, S.C., flanked by two uniformed security guards, 16year-old...
NYPD Black and Blue: Aggressive Police Tactics Have Made a Big Dent in Crime - at the Cost of a Rise in Civilian Complaints
Aggressive police tactics have made a big dent in crime--at the cost of a rise in civilian complaints AROUND HER NORTHERN MANHATTAN neighborhood, Diane Saarinen led the cheers for the New York City police. She regularly hosted community forums at...
Prepare for Takeoff
Fossils suggest how the dinosaur got its wings THE FORCES oF EVOLUTION ARE mighty indeed, having sculpted flora and fauna as diverse as magnolia trees and algae, dust mites and cheetabs, through natural selection, also known as survival of the fittest....
Real-Life Mini-Series: Dramas like Kelly Flinn or O.J. Have Become Our Preferred Form of National Entertainment
Dramas like Kelly Flinn or O.J. have become our preferred form of national entertainment ON THE DAY THE CAST OF THE DRAMA CONCERNING air force First Lt. Kelly Flinn's adultery and insubordination was expanded to include the former wife of Flinn's...
Rebirth of the Cool: In the Retro Grooves of Erykah Badu and Maxwell, the Film 'Love Jones' and a Hip-Hopping Poetry Scene, Black Bohemia Flexes Its Funk
In the retro grooves of Erykah Badu and Maxwell, the film 'love jones' and a hip-hopping poetry scene;black bohemia flexes its funk IT TOOK CORA SPEARMAN MORE THAN three weeks before she braved the Lit X stage, but now here she is, all Saturday-night...
'Road Rage': We're Driven to Destruction; Americans Are Losing It Behind the Wheel
Americans are losing it behind the wheel IN THE SIMPLE ACT OF MERGING INTO traffic on the highway you can see how evolutionary history has failed to prepare human beings for life in the 20th century. It is there that humanity's powerful instinet...
Sex and Lies
The strange case of Lieutenant Flinn is over, but in the military the war over women goes on. MINOT, N.D., IS A FLAT and lonely place. There's not much there, aside from the 150 nuclear-tipped ICBMs buried in the surrounding wheat fields. A young...
Speaking to History: With Few Chances for Greatness at Home, Clinton Looks Abroad to Make His Mark
With few chances for greatness at home, Clinton looks abroad to make his mark. An interview with the president. BILL CLINTON HAS ALWAYS BEEN A MAN WITH AN EYE on his place in history. But now, having fought his last campaign, and with fewer than...
The Pamela Mystique: Harriman's Stuff Attracts the Curious at Sotheby's
Harriman's stuff attracts the curious at Sotheby's MY LIFE HAS Given me a unique opportunity to shop," Pamela Digby Churchill Hayward Herriman once said. The fruits of all those shopping trips were dispersed last week as Sotheby's auctioned off...
The Plan and the Man: High Vision and Low Politics: How George Marshall and a Few Good Men Led America to an Extraordinary Act of Strategic Generosity
High vision and low politics: how George Marshall and a few good men led America to an extraordinary act of strategic generosity. DURING THE WINTER OF 1946-47, the worst in memory, Europe seemed on the verge of 'collapse. For the victors in World...
The Roots of Rock
The edgy, unpretty music of the rural South was always alternative. Now, old recordings and a provocative new book lay bare rock's secret history. HERE'S A STORY JOHN COHEN tells about Harry Smith, the avant-garde filmmaker, beatnik polymath and...
The Virtues of Silence: Amid the Clatter of Today's Culture, Quiet Should Be a Reward, Not a Punishment
Amid the clatter of today's culture, quiet should be a reward, not a punishment VACATIONS OFTEN SEEM LIKE A RUSH TO ESCAPE anxiety, missions of restoration doomed to disappointment. Last summer my wife and I visited the Grand Teton and Yellowstone...
Trains You Can Miss
Don't chase hot new stocks. Let them cool before you plunk down dough. DON'T LOOK NOW, BUT IT'S FRENZY time again in cybergreed land. The market for initial public offerings of Internet stocks, which switches from hot to cold faster than a mouse...
Zapping the Eye
Laser vision correction could soon free millions from their glasses. The new procedures are safe, but only if you have a competent surgeon. HOLLY WILLIAMS GOT HER first pair of eyeglasses in kindergarten. She graduated to hard contact lenses at...