Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 130, No. 1, July 7

A Starr-Crossed Probe?
Delving into Clinton's alleged sexual past, the special prosecutor ends up embarrassing himself KEN STARR'S DEPUTIES CALLED IT, simp]y, The Trooper Project. Looking for evidence that Bill Clinton had lied about his Arkansas business deals, frustrated...
Cradles to Coffins: It's an Unusual Crime, but Neonaticide Still Shocks the Public and Perplexes Researchers
LINDA CHU PREFERRED HER accommodations at the Century Apartments, a complex owned by the University of Southern California, to a regular dorm room because, she told the student newspaper last year, "the residence halls are much more open-door... you...
His Future's So Bright
Will Smith is Hollywood's new Untouchable: he acts, raps and always scores. Stardom? He makes it look good. WILL SMITH HAS A DARK, fatal flaw. It's an obsession of sorts, the kind of thing that can drive loved ones crazy and might even, if allowed...
Inside the Mind of a Spy
EARL PITTS, FORMER FUTURE Farmer of America, army captain, FBI agent--and, more recently, spy for the KGB--stood before the judge to receive his sentence, "Mr. Pitts, federal district court Judge T. S. Ellis III said last week, "I have just one question:...
Louis Will Never Go Away Again: His Lost Tunes Found. A New Bio. Still More CDs. an America Icon Is Back
His lost tunes found. A new bio. Still more CDs. An American icon is back. LOUIS ARMSTRONG DIED BELIEVING he really was born on July 4,1900. Only in the '80s did his baptismal certificate turn up, proving the actual date was Aug. 4, 1901. But the...
Matters of Life and Death
For the high court, the states are where the action is THE CURRENT U.S. supreme Court, it seems, has a hard time finding a state's right it doesn't like. Or a congressional act it does. Deciding several momentous cases last week, the court once...
Moscow, We Have a Problem
In orbit, three men--two Russians, one American--struggle to survive a terrifying mishap. Inside the debacle. BY BILL POWELL AND JERRY ADLER THE THREE MEN FELT THE crash the instant it happened. "When you get hit by 7 1/2 tons, you feel it," said...
Move over, Rover: Whether You Are in a Real Emergency or Just a Bad Mood, a Cat Can Be a True Lifesaver
DOGS TEND TO GET ALL THE CREDIT WHEN IT COMES to heroism, but I prefer to keep a cat around the house in case of emergencies. Wednesday was a sorry-looking thing when I adopted her from the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. She was...
New Homes on the Range: Career-Switching Yuppies Head for Cooking School
Career-switching Yuppies head for cooking school IT WAS A SUBLIME MOMENT. SUSAN Hurst, 33, crafted a tiny cup out of white chocolate, filled it with coffee mousse, attached an edible handle, balanced it on a chocolate saucer, garnished it with a...
'Nine Months of Hiding': How One Teenager Who Denied She Was Pregnant Chose to Keep Her Baby
I JUST COULD NOT FACE the reality. It was July 2, just after my last year in high school, and I was looking at the results of a home pregnancy test. It was one of those plus-minus ones, and I just refused to believe it read positive. Then it started...
Odd Squad
A neurotic director. A grouchy star. A writer fired five times. How did 'Men in Black' become the summer's coolest breeze? A THOUSAND YEARS AGO EVERYBODY KNEW AS a fact that the Earth was the center of the universe. Five hundred years ago they knew...
Oh, to Be Young and Chinese
Around the globe, the handover has prompted a burst of national pride. That's fine, as long as Beijing doesn't get carried away. COCO HAS BLEACHED-BLOND:HAIR, BLUE CONTACT lenses, and a silver stud in his nose. Not your typical Chinese patriot,...
One Fantastic Voyage
Jacques Cousteau, seaman extraordinaire CAN YOU REMEMBER A TIME there were no scuba divers? When our vision of the ocean went no deeper than the keel of a glass-bottom boat? That's the way it was before Jacques-Yves Cousteau. He co-invented the...
Painting the Town Red
Look beyond the fireworks this week. At the stroke of midnight, Hong Kong Will take on a whole new character. WHO SAYS NOTHING'S GOING TO CHANGE IN Hong Kong when the clock strikes midnight on July 17 Across town, 400 government workers with welding...
Roswell - the Sequel: Now the Military Has a New Explanation
THE AIR FORCE HAS DECLARED victtory over the aliens: Last week the military released a 231-page report that it hoped would finally bury the mother of all UFO stories: the Roswell Incident. In 1947 a sheep rancher near Roswell, N.M., found a blanket...
Rupert's Team
Rupert Murdoch many hats: billionaire, media baron, TV and cable impresario. Now he's building a global sports empire--making deals at a feverish space and, as is his wont, paying top dollar for the jewels that catch his eye. CHAMPIONS KEEP COOL,...
The Great Divide: Westinghouse Ends Up on the Side of the Angels
ONE OF CBS'S FEW SUCCESSFUL NEW shows these days is "Touched by an Angel," a sitcom featuring divine creatures that come down to earth to rescue mere mortals from vexing problems. Michael Jordan, the guy who runs CBS, tried to apply an angelic touch...
The Istanbul Express: Americans Flock to Turkey Seeking Exotic Sites and Bargain Prices
DREW LARNER HAD ALREADY HIT most of the conventional tourist stops in Western Europe. At the age of 33, he had a hankering for something more adventurous this summer. So last month, together with a friend, he set out for Turkey. After three days in...
The New Dealmakers: The Next Generation of Cigarette Execs Take Over
THE ANTI-SMOKING ACTIVISTS ASSEMBLED at the Marriott Hotel in Crystal City, Va., last April 3 thought they knew the typical tobacco executive: a middle-aged Southern white male shrouded in smoke and determined to stonewall. But at this first secret...
There's No Place like Home, Unless It's the Office
TELECOMMUTING: it's a word that conjures up more than its fair share of wishful thinking. Wouldn't it be great to get away from the office? These days it's the rare cog who doesn't secretly wish to sneak out from under the boss's watchful glare and...
The Rocket's Red Glare
For Clemens, pitching well is the best revenge THE GLOWER, THE GOATEE AND THE gas on the 97-mile-per-hour fast ball are all the same. Yet Roger Clemens is not easily recognizable on the mound of Toronto's SkyDome, having traded in his red sox for...
The Uses of the Past: Historians and Archeologists Dig Up Evidence to Support China's Growing Nationalism
Historians and archeologists dig up evidence to support China's growing nationalism EACH SPRING, Archeologist Zheng Guang selects a wheat field near Erlitou and digs toward the origin of Chinese civilization. Since the 1960s he has unearthed an...
What about Books?
Some hi-tech libraries get low grades. NOBODY SAYS NO to Bill Gates, especially when he's giving away money. So the library world was ecstatic last week when the Microsoft magnate announced he was pouring $200 million into public libraries. But...