Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 130, No. 23, December 8

A Chief's Fall from Grace: Scandal and Bungling Bring Down D.C.'S Top Cop
Scandal and bungling bring down D.C.'s top cop LARRY SOULSBY'S CRITICS OFTEN SAID he was asleep on the job. But it was where the Washington, D.C., police chief actually slept that finally did him in. The man who was supposed to reform D.C.'s struggling...
All I Want for Christmas
JUST BETWEEN YOU AND US, THERE'S A PROBLEM WITH our holiday gift roundups. Several million people buy this magazine or see it at the dentist's; your friends and loved ones may be among them. Picture it: Christmas morning. Your FALOs unwrap groovy critics'...
Amistad
AMID CONTROVERSY AND GREAT EXPECTATIONS, Spielberg's film resurrects a crucial episode in African American history; By David Ansen and Allison Samuels BORN WITH OUR eyes on the future, we Americans are notoriously oblivious to history--our own or...
At War in the Pentagon: The Inside Story of One Woman's Fall from Power
The inside story of one woman's fall from power THE MARINES WERE INDIGNANT. Assistant Secretary of the Army Sara Lister had been quoted saying that the marines are extremists. Wherever you have extremists, you've got some risks of total disconnections...
Help Really Wanted: A Nerd Shortage Has Companies Scrambling to Lure High-Tech Workers - and Growing Their Own
A nerd shortage has companies scrambling to lure high-tech workers--and growing their own GLENN FORD, 17, IS A PRETTY TYPICAL senior. He likes sports and studies English, trigonometry and history. But come afternoon, he morphs into a Future Technician...
Home Is Not for Everyone: Placing a Special-Needs Child in an 'Institution' Does Not Mean That You Are a Bad Mother
Placing a special-needs child in an 'institution' does not mean that you are a bad mother FIFTEEN YEARS AGO I HAD A COLUMN IN THIS SPACE. or course I was younger in the photograph (black and white, then) but serious looking and a little worn around...
How to Beat the Heat
Global warming won't be bad for everyone. Some regions and industries will actually benefit. A look at who will win--and who will lose--when we all live in the greenhouse. BY SHARON BEGLEY; ILLUSTRATIONS BY LARRY GONICK AVERAGES DON'T MEAN much...
Into the Deep
Brace yourself: Asia's spreading financial crisis might soon go global SEIICHI TANIGASHIRA LEFT NO note. Nor did he give a warning. Perhaps the 40-year-old investment manager believed there was no need to explain what he was about to do. At 8 a.m....
Men Behaving Badly: It May Be Assault, but Is It Sexual Harassment When the Predator and Victim Are the Same Gender?
It may be assault, but is it sexual harassment when the predator and victim are the same gender? Joseph Oncale had been working for only a few weeks as a roustabout on an oil rig off the Gulf of Mexico when, he says, the trouble began. Traveling...
Millionaires Next Door: That Is, If Your Neighbors Work for Microsoft
That is, if your neighbors work for Microsoft WHEN IT CAME TO CELEBRATING Thanksgiving last week, Microsoft's employees were among those with the most to be grateful for. As the holiday dawned, Microsoft employees' paper profits on their stock options...
Not Much of an Honor: Can a Professor Have Tenure but Not Have a Job?
Can a professor have tenure but not have a job? PSYCHOLOGIST DANIEL Kirschenbaum enjoys an increasingly rare distinction in the halls of academe: he is a tenured professor. That privileged position, generally bestowed after years of teaching and...
Out of the Many Many, One
Robert Silvers's computer program combines thousands of images to create photomosaics. But when will AI Gore Set the portrait he ordered? TWO YEARS AGO, AFTER four days of round-the-clock programming, Robert Silvers put the final touches on a powerful...
Running on Fumes: Curbing Global Warming Was Supposed to Be Al Gore's Road to Glory. Then Politics and the High Cost of Climate Control Got in the Way
Curbing global warming was supposed to be Al Gore's road to glory. Then politics and the high cost of climate control got in the way. WEARY AIDES TO AL Gore call it his "Climate 101" lecture. This week he'll give it once again-an apocalyptic recitation...
Sand in Our Eyes: As the Inspectors in Baghdad Hunt for Saddam's Secret Arsenal, Washington Worries about What Comes Next
As the inspectors in Baghdad hunt for Saddam's secret arsenal, Washington worries about what comes next THERE WAS DEFENSE SECRETARY William Cohen last week, giving another hair-raising briefing about chemical and biological weapons. Saddam Hussein...
Say It with Pixels
Thanks to cheaper color printers and improved software, do-it-yourself greeting cards aren't just for kids anymore. THINKING OF A WAY top last year's holiday cards? Consider making your own. People have been creating hokey homemade cards for years,...
'Sell In,' Bliss Out
Sick of selling out, a new Yuppie class--Young Unhappy Professionals--have found a way exit the rat race, be happy and succeed without cable IT WAS COMING UP ON CHRISTMAS OF 1994 and Demaris Brinton, 85, was three years from partnership in a top...
Slavery's Lesson Plan: Schools Are Doing Better at Teaching America's 'Peculiar' Past
Schools are doing better at teaching America's 'peculiar' past. "AMISTAD" IS A history lesson any high-school teacher could envy. It's in living color and bigger than life-full of conflict and human emotion, a vivid retelling of an almost-forgotten...
Sober, Rested and Ready: While Their Men Drown in Vodka and Self-Pity, Russian Women Move on and Up
While their men drown in vodka and self-pity, Russian women move on and up When ANNA KOFF, A 24-year-old political-science graduate of Moscow's most prestigious university, applied for a salesclerk's position at the Moscow airport's duty-free shop...
Spoils of Law: They Struck Gold - Then Fought. Call Them the Lawyers of the Sierra Madre
They struck gold--then fought. Call them the Lawyers of the Sierra Madre. IT SOUNDED LIKE A LAWYER JOKE AT first. How do you ruin a lawyers' dinner? Start talking about cutting their fees. No one was laughing, though. The evening had begun pleasantly...
The Battle in the Aisles: A Black Market in Baby Formula in Iraq Leads to a Scam That Has Crack Addicts Shoplifting in Middle America
A black market for baby formula in Iraq leads to a scam that has crack addicts shoplifting in Middle America ASK POLICE OFFICERS IN the Dallas-Ft. Worth area about a certain Texas smuggling ring, and you'll get all sorts of harrowing stories. Big...
The Long Shadow of Slavery
AN IMPORTANT NEW MOVIE, and a fresh debate over a national apology, show that even after more than a century America's 'original sift still haunts the national psyche. For nations, like people, distant memory of trauma can be submerged and repressed...
The Tigers Teeter Dangerously: Twenty Years of Prosperity Made the Pacific Rim a Model of Political Stability. Can 'Asian Values' Weather Hard Times, Too?
Twenty years of prosperity made the Pacific Rim a model of political stability. Can Asian values' weather hard times, too? BY STEVEN STRASSER AS PACIFIC LEADERS GRAPPLED WITH ASIA'S MARKET meltdown at their economic summit in Vancouver last week,...
Well, Here We Go Again: The FDA Approves a New Anti-Obesity Drug
The FDA approves a new anti-obesity drug BALANCING A DRUG'S BENEFITS against its side effects is tricky business. That was the lesson in September when American Home Products, the maker of two drugs for treating obesity-Redux (dexfenfluramine) and...
When You Can Really Make a Silk Purse from a Sow's Ear
SOMETIME IN THE 23D century, a miraculous piece of technology will save us from ourselves. That's the predicted advent of the replicator, a device that breaks down garbage into molecules and energy and converts them into usable stuff-a ham-and-cheese...