Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 131, No. 16, April 20

A Mars Makeover: New NASA Pictures End an Old Debate - Almost
When NASA released the first pictures of the region of Mars called Cydonia, taken by the orbiting Viking I in 1976, even the agency's own researchers joked that the little blur in the corner looked a heck of a lot like a face. Officially, they said...
An Insider's War Stories
My gynecologist started me at may annual checkup when she said, "After you get dressed, I'd like you to sit on the bench in the hall before you leave." The only other time I'd been asked to sit on the bench was during my pregnant days when one of...
Backlash in the Ranks
A disturbing report, on `don't ask, don't tell' It was definitely not the result President Bill Clinton had in mind when he instituted the "don't ask, don't tell, don't pursue" policy toward gays in the military in 1993. Last week the Pentagon disclosed...
Bill's Social Security Schmooze
Mid-Monica, Clinton is desperate for a legacy. The biggest entitlement of all could give him one. The gym was like any other, the kind Bill Clinton had performed in a thousand times before. Now here he was in Kansas City--his first trip to the heartland...
Cross over, Beethoven; While Pop Stars Go Classical, Classical Stars Go Pop; Their Records Are Selling, but Are They Any Good?
While pop stars go classical, classical stars go pop. Their records are selling, but are they any good? When Michael Bolton came out with a CD of arias in January, it took a monumental effort not to rush to judgment. Then he went on "The Nanny" to...
Ignore the Stars in Your Eyes, and Focus on the Risk: This Deal Is Sexy, but Will We Hate It in the Morning?
Yes, money watching really must be closing in on sex as America's favorite obsession. That's the only way to explain the orgiastic reception of last week's news that two huge financial companies -- Citicorp and Travelers Group -- plan to combine into...
I'm a 'Coalition of One': On the Eve of Israel's Anniversary, Netanyahu Says Peace with the Palestinians Is Still Possible
On the eve of Israel's anniversary, Netanyahu says peace with the Palestinians is still possible After a rocky two years as prime minister of Israel, Benjamin Netanyahu, 48, appears to be hitting his stride. Under pressure from the Clinton administration...
New Hope for Women at Risk
The drug tamoxifen is the first compound ever shown to reduce some women's chances of developing breast cancer. But in some cases, the benefits of the drug may pale next to its dangers. Bonnie Krull, 54, had already had enough breast-cancer scares...
'Papericizing' Policy: It Has Become a Substitute Fro Engagement That Bears Any Cost or Could Change Anything
I don't even know you, but I'm willing to bet you have had it up to here with the avalanche of unsolicited mail-order catalogs the post office dumps in your mailbox every day. It occurred to me once that I might start saving mine and stacking them...
Pay? How about a Pizza? Cost-Cutting Companies Want Employees to Give Something for Nothing
Few workers at Albertson's Gerber Road store in Sacramento worked harder than Roberta Garrett. Ostensibly a part-timer in the grocery's specialty meat and fish section, she routinely did tasks such as wrapping salmon and stuffing pork chops before...
Photons: Coming Even Faster to a Computer near You
Imagine cruising the internet with no patience-exhausting delays. Ha! Information and graphics flashing on your screen as quickly as your remote control now brings you a TV channel? As if! Video and sound streaming effortlessly from your PC, bringing...
Saving a Sunken Treasure: While the Titanic Remains at Ocean's Bottom, Congress Weighs a Plan to Raise the Civil War Ship Monitor
While the Titanic remains at ocean's bottom, Congress weighs a plan to raise the Civil War ship Monitor Even though its seagoing life was almost as short as the Titanic's, the Union ship USS Monitor was the billion-dollar megahit of 19th-century...
Stubbing out a Deal
RJR's Steven Goldstone thought Wall Street was tough--then he came to Washington. Behind his decision to walk away. He was depressed. As president of RJR Nabisco, the nation's second largest cigarette maker, Steven Goldstone was used to the abuse...
Sure, It's Big: The Merger of Citicorp and Travelers Creates a Financial-Services Giant. but What's in It for Consumers?
The merger of Citicorp and Travelers creates a financial-services giant. But what's in it for consumers. Assume you're a typical middle-class wage slave, muddling your way through household economics. You've got the usual array of checking, savings...
The 'Barrett Traverse': Intel's New CEO May Be Right for Tight Times
Friends of Craig Barrett, the recently anointed successor to Intel CEO Andrew S. Grove, talk about something called the "Barrett traverse." It's the phrase for the way Barrett -- who at 58 years does a couple of hundred push-ups and sit-ups on days...
The Easter Peace: A Dramatic Deal Raises Northern Ireland's Hopes
There are few Pollyannas in Northern Ireland. "Peace walls" divide Protestant and Roman Catholic neighborhoods, shootings and bombings have taken more than 3,000 lives in the past 30 years and graffiti spell out sectarian hate. Under tremendous pressure...
The Last Laugh
In the end, there would be hugging, even learning. Larry David always said the mantra for the anti-sitcom he created with Jerry Seinfeld is "No hugging, no learning." But Wednesday night, after the taping of "Seinfeld's" top-secret finale, waterworks...
The Late Great Tate: An Artist Is Rediscoverd; April Fool
If the hoax was really meant to be a hoax, then it was a fake. On April Fools' eve, rocker David Bowie and the new art-book venture 21 Publishing Ltd. threw a party at artist Jeff Koons's New York studio. Guests could schmooze with the likes of talk-show...
The Lessons's of Bosnia's War: A New Book Reminds America That a Crisis Anywhere Can Affect Its National Interest Simply If Nobody Else Can Handle It
A new book reminds America that a crisis anywhere can affect its national interest simply if nobody else can handle it. The wars of the Yugoslav succession were nasty, brutish and unnecessarily long, Between 1991 and 1995, more than 300,000 people...
The Object of My Affection
In most respects, the slick, lightweight The Object of My Affection is indistinguishable from dozens of other fluffy Hollywood romances. What's different about this romantic comedy--a loose adaptation of Stephen McCauley's 1987 novel--is the dilemma...
Whose Israel Is It? after 50 Years, the Nation's Jewish Solidarity Has Dissolved into Tribal Clashes
After 50 years, the nation's Jewish solidarity has dissolved into tribal clashes. They are the faces of Israel Past and Israel Present, and they could hardly be more different. When the Jewish state proclaimed its independence 50 years ago, its leader...
Will Japan Save Itself?
Washington demands, and Tokyo delivers--a little bit. But on deregulation Japan is still going its own way. Believe it or not, there is some good news coming out of Japan these days. In central Tokyo, a popular noodle shop has begun offering bowls...