Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 133, No. 13, March 29

2000 Years of Jesus
For believers, he is the hinge of history. But even by secular standards, Jesus is the dominant figure of Western culture. How Christian ideas shaped the modern world--for good and, sometimes, for ill. Historians did not record his birth. Nor, for...
A Highly Unorthodox Debut : Fiction's Hot New Talent Mines His Jewish Heritage
Nathan Englander grew up in what he calls "a little Jewish biosphere." The tightknit Orthodox community on New York's Long Island was also "right wing, xenophobic and anti-intellectual," according to the 29- year-old author. There he received "an old-style...
Albright's Old World Ways : Is the Secretary of State --Accustomed to Seeing Things in Black and White-A Cold Warrior Caught in the Wrong Decade?
Two recent scenes from the life of Madeleine Korbel Albright: Independence, Mo., the home of the Truman Library, part of the iconography of the American Century. Albright--the most media-savvy secretary of State since Henry Kissinger--has fussed over...
A Record Setting Flight : For the First Time, a Balloon Flies around the World
Ok, it wasn't quite as big as Lindbergh's flight to Paris--but when Bertrand Piccard and Brian Jones soared high over the coast of Mauritania last week, they earned a niche in history as the first balloonists to circle the Earth. Their 29,000-mile-plus...
Fighting for Fitness : Tired of the Treadmill? Consider Learning How to Kick
Virginia Pereira likes to make things happen fast. Two years ago the 27-year-old Los Angeles actress put on 12 pounds for a movie role, assuming she would shed them when the filming was over. But when the time came to part, the 12 pounds wanted to...
Follow the Money : The Latest Kremlin Scandal Involves Billions of Dollars Moving Offshore-Plus Sex and Videotape
The plot reads like source material for John le Carre. In 1990 the Soviet Union was in its death throes. Its economy was deteriorating, the trade deficit was deepening and it was increasingly unable to pay its foreign debts. On Nov. 27 that year, a...
God's Hand on My Life : I Know That One of the Joys of Heaven Will Be in Discovering the Hidden Ways in Which Christ Acted to Protect and Guide Us
I remember when I first made my commitment to Christ, it wasn't an emotional experience. I didn't see any lights flashing, I didn't see any great things happening, but something had happened inside of me. It's still there today and it has never left,...
In the Line of Fire
Squaring off against the Serbs, Clinton strikes a hawkish note. But the reality in Kosovo is more complicated than the rhetoric--and the president is now facing a tricky test. In theory, Bill Clinton should have been nervous. It had been nearly...
Is This a Job Worth Fighting (Fair) for? Mom Was Elected-Despite Her Opponent's Tactics. Will Negative Campaigns Discourage Others?
Five months ago I walked into my mother's house on a rainy afternoon. She was sitting on the couch, shoulders slumped forward, holding an oversized piece of mail. She looked at me, dejected, and asked, "Why do I put myself through this?" My mom's...
Knowing You All Too Well
If you think the IRS knows a lot about you and your habits, wait until you buy something on the Internet. And the information is for sale. Early in George Orwell's "1984," one scene exemplifies a world without privacy. Ostensibly alone in his squalid...
Lies, Damned Lies And. : Statistics, Such as the '74 Cents' Factoid Used to Prove Pervasive Sex Discrimination
With the Dow average nearing a fifth digit, Americans are cheerful. However, soon the women's division of the Great American Grievance Industry will weigh in, saying women remain trapped beneath the "glass ceiling" and in the "pink ghetto." Brace yourself...
Money's Loud Voice : Jim Cramer Is a Market Soothsayer for Our Times. but Does This Guru Wear Too Many Turbans?
Unless you think "the market" refers only to a place to buy vegetables, you've probably heard of James J. Cramer. The full-time money manager and part-time stock-market commentator (whose 19-hour workdays start at 3 a.m.) has been hard to miss, what...
Murder at Yosemite : Two Bodies Are Found after a Long Search
For four weeks police, family and volunteers combed the rugged terrain of the Sierra Nevada mountains in and near Yosemite National Park by helicopter, foot and skis. They were looking for a missing red 1999 Pontiac Grand Prix--and the women who rented...
No Green Light Yet : A Long-Awaited Report Supports Medical Marijuana. So Now What?
For Scott Imler, it was finally time to exhale. Six months ago, Imler feared his Los Angeles Cannabis Center would be shut down by federal authorities. Last week, after the Institute of Medicine released its findings on the medical merits of marijuana,...
'Not of This World' : A Conservative Argues the Religious Right Is Going Wrong by Focusing on Politics Instead of Prayer
The day after the 1980 election, those of us associated with what came to be called the "religious right"--I was working for Jerry Falwell's Moral Majority--thought we saw a revelation from God. Not only had Ronald Reagan won the White House, but five...
Outsmarting an Illness : Choosing Your Own Specialists Is Not the Key to Good Care
If you suffer from heart disease, diabetes, arthritis or asthma, you know all about managed care. And chances are, you think the best way to get the services you need is to join the health plan that lets you see the greatest number of specialists....
Perspectives
"If we and our allies don't have the will to act, there will be more massacres." President Clinton, explaining the justification for potential U.S.-led military action in the Balkans at his first full-fledged press conference in nearly a year ...
Rosie O'Donnell's TV Battle of the Band
At first, it looked like the queen of nice had turned mean. A Georgia high-school band gets a certified letter inviting them on "The Rosie O'Donnell Show." The kids raise $81,000 to go to New York--and get dumped by Rosie at the last minute. Headlines...
Some Room at 'The View' : Help Wanted. Coffee's Hot. So's the Competition
Channel one reporter Lisa Ling was expelled from Tibet, chased by a drunken bodyguard in Cambodia and forced to flee gunfire in Afghanistan. Then her life got really scary: she applied to cohost "The View." "[The ABC executives] immediately asked about...
So This Is Your Life? A Good Ole Boy Becomes the Talk of the Nation in Ron Howard's Raucous Media Satire 'EDtv'
Since EDtv is about a guy whose life is played out in front of TV cameras, comparisons will be made to "The Truman Show." The similarities are obvious, with the crucial difference that Ed Pekurny (Matthew McConaughey), the 31-year-old video-store clerk...
Ten Years after the Spill
The Exxon Valdez and the legacy it left When the Exxon Valdez ran aground in Alaska's Prince William Sound on March 24, 1989, it lost 11 million gallons of oil, the largest spill in U.S. history. A decade later, oil residues remain, and toxic hydrocarbons...
The Dow Generation : We're Building Our Lives around the Belief That, like the Sun, Stocks Always Rise
It doesn't pay to have memories in stock markets like this. They only upset you. You're apt to be thrown off your stride by the words of an older world--dusty stuff like "earnings" and "dividends" (ask your grandfather what they mean). This is not...
The Long, Winding Road to Gold : Michelle Kwan Recalls the Pain of Nagano and Her Hopes for Salt Lake City
The post-Olympic year is figure skating's sleepiest season, so Michelle Kwan's coach, Frank Carroll, searches for new ways to motivate his 18-year-old champion. After a recent practice, he ventured this quadruple leap: if Kwan defends her world championship...
The Only World They Know : The Government Is Closing the Only Mainland U.S. Leprosy Hospital-Whether the Residents Want It to or Not
Johnny Harmon met his wife, Anne, at the leprosy hospital in Carville, La., in 1935. He was 24, a dapper young draftsman from East Texas with telltale spots on his knee and buttock. She was a 12-year-old girl whose parents torched their own home to...
'The Penetration Is Total' : CIA Analysts Find Shocking Evidence That Chinese Spies Have Cracked Even the Most Secret Weapons Labs
The news was worse than the CIA had imagined. Last week, in response to recent reports that China may have stolen nuclear secrets from Los Alamos and other U.S. weapons labs, President Clinton ordered a preliminary "damage assessment" to determine...
The Price of Prosperity : Cheap Imports? No Problem-Except for Steelworkers
Well, how would you like it? You spend a decade getting right with the gods of global free trade--shedding jobs, scaling back pensions and health-care benefits, boosting efficiency--only to get swamped by a surge in ultracheap imports from countries...
Time to Short Beanies? : Lessons about Investing from Peanut the Elephant
Checked the value of your portfolio lately? No, not that one. The one that might pay your kids' way through college: the Beanie Baby collection. Apparently there's trouble in the world of stuffed-animal investing. Sure, the Dow is playing footsie with...
'Toon in Tomorrow : 'Simpsons' Creator Matt Groening Unveils 'Futurama.' George Orwell? Meet George Jetson
Standing out in a crowd has never been a problem for Matt Groening. In school, he often found himself the lucky winner of an all-expense-paid trip to the principal's office. As a cartoonist, he's given the world "Life in Hell," a singularly skewed...