Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 135, No. 21, May 22

A Breakup Is Too Harsh: And Will Keep Us from Doing What We Do Best: Innovating
Anyone who uses a personal computer, cares about preserving America's leadership in technology or is concerned about overreaching government regulation should take a close look at the government's proposal to break apart Microsoft and saddle it with...
A Gunmaker's Agony: Inside Smith & Wesson's Fight to Survive the Crossfire
Most nights now you can find Ed Shultz in his office, banging away at a computer. It's been several weeks since Smith & Wesson signed a landmark deal with the Feds requiring training and unlimited background checks for all its customers and new...
A Kremlin Crackdown: A Raid on a Media Empire Raises Some Old Fears
Vladimir Putin, who was sworn in as Russia's new president early last week, gets along well with most of the "oligarchs" who dominate the nation's economy. One exception is Vladimir Gusinsky, the founder of Russia's largest private media empire. Gusinsky's...
A Reckoning in the Bayou: The Feds Finally Run the Table on Edwin Edwards
His luck finally ran out last week. Seventy-two-year-old former governor Edwin W. Edwards was convicted of extorting almost $3 million from companies that applied for riverboat-casino licenses. A craps player noted for his love of beautiful women and...
Arming Myself with a Gun Is Not the Answer
When my father died 15 years ago, my brother and I inherited the old Midwestern farmhouse our grandparents had purchased in the 1930s. I was the one who decided to give up my harried existence as a teacher in New York City and make a life in this idyllic...
Bearing Witness in the Twilight: On a Journey to One of America's Poorest Neighborhoods, Jonathan Kozol Finds Both Bleakness and Beauty
Like some secular Savonarola out to eradicate in-equality, Jonathan Kozol has railed against complacency for more than 30 years. His first book, "Death at an Early Age," set the tone for much of what was to follow. It was an angry, mournful narrative...
Elian: The Emotions
More than 1,000 readers crammed our mailbox with comments on our May 1 cover story, "Seizing Elian." Six hundred more responded to George Will's column, which harshly criticized the INS raid. "I'm glad Janet Reno feels it went well. Me? I'm ashamed...
FACING DEATH ON YOUR OWN TERMS: Too Many People Live Their Final Weeks in a State of Artificially Prolonged Pain. How to Avoid That
About a year ago a friend called, asking what she could do for an elderly neighbor. The neighbor suffered from severe heart failure. Shortness of breath kept him even from walking to a toilet. One day his heart stopped, and his wife called in paramedics....
Fading of the Light: The Eye Disease AMD Is Currently Incurable, but You Can Take Steps to Manage It
It's a cruel visual trick: you see someone in front of you, but you can't make out her features. Is it a friend? A stranger? Your own child? This is the heart-wrenching reality of severe age-related macular degeneration (AMD). It attacks the macula,...
Fury and Fear: As Sierra Leone Slides toward Civil War and Other Conflicts Erupt in Africa, the West Wonders How to Keep Peace in a War Zone
In the abandoned foundry complex in central Freetown, thousands of jittery people are camped under a huge corrugated-steel shed, among enormous lathes and metal presses that haven't worked in at least two years. Young men play soccer, in air thick...
High Noon on the Hustings: As a Million Moms March against Guns, Bush Finds Himself in the Cross Hairs
There are plenty of reasons for Al Gore and George W. Bush to take the gun issue seriously. Pat Thomas is one of them. In 1995 her son Jerome was at a party at a friend's house when a group of rowdy young men started bullying his friends. Jerome stepped...
How's Your 401(k) Today? Lawyers Are Starting to Draw a Bead on Plans That May Not Put Your Needs and Interests First
The sagging stock market hasn't yet scared the 35 million workers who contribute to company 401(k) plans. You keep making regular investments to your plan's various mutual funds. Large numbers of you also own company stock through the plan--often in...
'It's like EverythingYou Just Roll with It': Michael J. Fox Talks about Living with Parkinson's, Bonding with His Children and Starting a New Life
Only a few days after taping his emotional final episode of "Spin City" before a teary studio audience that included his mother and his wife, Michael J. Fox spoke to NEWSWEEK's Marc Peyser. PEYSER: Was there a particular moment when you decided...
Los Alamos under Siege: A Fire's Dangerous Cost
The worst of it came shortly after 1 a.m. last Thursday when firefighters were hosing down the tindery brush on the western edge of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The wind was gusting to 60 miles an hour, and suddenly they were fighting two fires...
Move over, Sandra Dee: Reigning Teen Queen Britney Spears Heads into Her Sophomore Year, Offering a Little More Sass in Class
I'm not that innocent," claims Britney Spears on the title track of her sophomore album and follow-up to last year's omnipresent "... Baby One More Time." The 18-year-old queen of bubble-gum pop could be commenting on the toll fame has taken on her...
New Bid on the Block: As Sotheby's Fights Scandal, Phillips Tries to Angle
What do you get by combining Louis Vuitton, a rented museum, a famous abstract painting of two rectangles, the Justice Department and Sharon Stone? Answer: a toehold in the snobby world of New York art auctions. But barely. Last week Phillips--an...
Our Remedy Plan Is Fair: Microsoft Broke the Law. This Is the Best Way to Repair the Damage
The Justice Department's proposed remedy in the Microsoft case will stimulate competition throughout the high-tech industry and lead to increased innovation, better products and lower prices for consumers. Here's why. Microsoft's Windows holds monopoly...
Perspectives
"'Take the medicine now' probably is a good description." Sen. John McCain, on his endorsement of George W. Bush for the Republican presidential nomination, in a reply to a reporter's question "By the way, I enthusiastically accept." George W. Bush,...
Private Lives, Public Matters: Character Isn't All, but It Does Count. How the Personal Manages to Turn into the Political
Fall in, character cops! It's time for another debate on where to draw the line between public and private behavior. After the endless impeachment mess, you may be bone weary of the topic, which is one of the reasons ratings for the Rudy Giuliani soap...
Raiding the 'Love Bug': Inside the Hunt for the Computer Hacker in Manila
The "Love Bug" virus did billions of dollars of damage in a score of countries. It penetrated the secret computer system of the code breakers at the National Security Agency and some classified systems at the Pentagon as well. Investigators quickly...
Ray and Frenchy's Big Adventure: A Thief and His Cookie-Baking Wife Land in Dough
Woody Allen is confused with the characters he plays more than any other performer, but "Small Time Crooks" should give that game a rest. No one is likely to mistake him for the hapless con man Ray Winkler, a bank robber so inept he and his gang of...
Sex and the City: Facing Cancer and a Race against Hillary Clinton, New York's Mayor Drops a Bomb on His Wife and Campaign 2000
The day began quietly enough for the First Lady of New York. Donna Hanover was at home, in the official residence, a quiet, tree-shaded refuge on the East River called Gracie Mansion. She had gotten the kids off to school, exercised, had lunch. A TV...
Stars, Money and Medical Crusades: Celebrities like Fox or Christopher Reeve Can Raise Millions to Fight a Disease. in Fact, Famous Faces Have Become Practically Essential
When Joan Samuelson first traveled to Capitol Hill to lobby for Parkinson's research funding in 1991, nobody knew or cared much about the disease. The hearing rooms where she testified were small, the turnout spotty. If she was lucky, she'd get to...
Stifler Goes on A 'Road Trip': This Summer's Designated Teen Scene-Stealer
A few months ago Seann William Scott was walking in Los Angeles when a complete stranger ran up to him and called him a "f---face," then told him he should get his "balls reattached." Scott, understandably, was delighted. "I just thought to myself,...
The Clash Goes On: The Feds Had Their Turn, and Now Bill Gates' Co. Have Returned Fire on the Breakup Plan. Plus: The Two Sides Square off Head-to-Head
Take cover. After getting pummeled by the government's breakup proposal, Microsoft unloaded legal filings last week that predict a devastating future for more than just the software giant if Bill Gates's empire gets split up. The company asked a federal...
The First Wanderers: Migrating 'Out of Africa' 1.7 Million Years Ago
When scientists dig through the ruins of a medieval castle and stumble across goblets, maces or other relics, they consider themselves lucky. The anthropologists working at the castle in the nation of Georgia were very, very lucky: after heavy rains...
The Iron Woman: The Triathlon Is a Bitterly Grueling Event, but Karen Smyers Is Used to Tribulation
First she got hit by a shattered storm window, which sliced her hamstring in half. A year later, it was an 18-wheeler truck. That one nearly killed her. Then last November she flipped over a fallen biker in the season's final triathlon and broke her...
The New War on Parkinson's: An Explosion of Research, Aided by the Candor and Energy of Michael J. Fox, Is Changing the Struggle against This Brain Disease, and Giving Hope to a Million Americans
He arrives late, unshaven and walking with a bowlegged shuffle. "I'm just waiting for the pill to kick in," says Michael J. Fox, extending a handshake and a request. "Could we wait a few more minutes? I'll be more human then." He ducks back into his...
The Rise of the 'Rego-Cops': How Local Powers Are Becoming the New Peacekeepers
Washington to U.N. peacekeepers: don't call us, we'll call you. After Sierra Leone, no one wants to send the United Nations into a war zone alone any time soon. The debacle of the last few weeks was a horrifying capstone to a series of post-cold-war...
The Tiger Beat Goes On: Before There Was 'N Sync, There Was Hanson. This Week the Three 'MMMBopping' Brothers from Oklahoma Are Back. How the World of Bubble-Gum Pop Is Growing Up
You can cuss in front of me," says Isaac Hanson to a photographer who nearly blurted the F word in front of the eldest member of the effervescent pop trio Hanson. "I'm not a kid, ya know. I'm 19," says the skinny singer-guitarist, who only recently...
The Vatican's 'Dream Man': The Pope's New Representative in New York Has a Different Style Than His Predecessor<emdash>and an Uneasy History with Him
When ailing Cardinal John O'Connor visited the pope last February, he didn't come just to say goodbye. Though both men knew it would likely be the last time they'd see each other, there was business to discuss: who would succeed O'Connor as Archbishop...
VW Rides a Hot Streak: The Carmaker Connects with Gen-Xers, but Some Key Creative People Have Hit the Road
When Carlyn Challgren moved to Los Angeles, she quickly fell into the California lifestyle--rock climbing, mountain biking, Rollerblading. But the one thing she lacked was a cool car. "I used to park as far away as possible so people wouldn't see what...
When in Rome, Do as The. 'Gladiator' Is a Big Hit, but Is It Historically Accurate?
Ok, you've thrilled to Russell Crowe's sullen charisma, squirmed at Joaquin Phoenix's spoiled-brat malevolence, wondered at the wild-eyed alcoholic glow that Richard Harris imparts to the philosopher-emperor Marcus Aurelius. But how much of "Gladiator"...
When Private Behavior Isn't: The Case of the Mayor, the Wife, the Woman, the Other Woman and Why It Should Matter
When Rudy Giuliani was revving up his first successful mayoral run in 1992, his wife called. Not long before, I had trashed her husband's candidacy in print, but Donna Hanover hadn't called to carp. She arranged lunch for the three of us at a nondescript...
Why Ford Came Clean: In a Surprising Move, the Big Automaker Admits That Its Popular SUVs Can Be Hazardous to Your Health
In the 16 months since William Clay Ford, Jr., 43, became chairman of the auto company his great-grandfather founded, he has been on a mission to merge industrialism with environmentalism. Last week, in a move that jolted the business community, Ford...