Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from August 21

At War in Long Beach: In a Surreal Standoff between the Buchanan Brigades and the Followers of Founder Ross Perot, America's Third Party Slips over the Edge. A Report from the Front Line
By the time Pat Buchanan arrived in Long Beach, Calif., the Reform Party convention had already split into two separate conventions, like parallel universes in some hard-to-follow sci-fi movie. In one hall were the Buchanan Brigades, who like to shout...
A Vision of the American Zion: Notes along the Way to Our Ecumenical Destiny
The Democratic party's nomination of Sen. Joe Lieberman delivers a sweet shock to the national mind. Jews have served for generations as legislators, governors and justices. But if there is ample historical record of Jewish participation in our national...
Candidate for the Status Quo: Gore Is an Expedient Conservative in the Sense That He'd Keep Things Pretty Much as They Are
In this election, the true conservative is Al Gore. He's conservative in the traditional sense that--at least judged by his words--he wouldn't change things much. He may be trying to escape Bill Clinton's personal shadow, but their policies are almost...
Clinton's Long Shadow: You Can't Escape Him. He Redefined Campaign Tactics and the Bully Pulpit in the Multimedia Age, and Both Gore and Bush Are Fighting on His Turf
At Willow Creek Community Church in South Barrington, Ill., last Thursday, the spirit moved Bill Clinton. Gently prodded by his pastor, surrounded by 4,500 sympathetic parishioners and thousands of ministers viewing via satellite, he unspooled a long...
Cyberscope
Two years ago the Museum of Science in Boston opened its "virtual fish tank" exhibit that let visitors create an animated fish complete with real-life behaviors. Last week the museum added an online component that lets you design your fish in the comfort...
Flaming Fury: Some 20,000 Bone-Tired Smoke Eaters, Including Military Reinforcements, Are Desperately Fighting to Hold the Line against Western Wildfires That Have Already Consumed More Than 4.4 Million Acres. Experts Say This Year's Destruction Was Just Waiting to Happen-And It Could Get a Lot Worse before It Ends
With no better way to keep from crying, Diana Davis searches the cabin's ashes for her lost wedding ring. The Montana lodgekeeper's quest is just about hopeless. Cinders, blackened metal and blobs of melted glass were all that remained of the Davises'...
How to Be a Money Guru: What Do You Need to Know to Give Investment Advice to the Public? Not Much, It Turns Out
Q: I became interested in financial investments 10 years ago, and have been successful enough to be able to retire. My friends are tied up in high-expense, low-performing mutual funds. I read several financial magazines and try to direct them toward...
Living in a 'Fantasy' World: PlayStation's No. 1 Smash Goes Hollywood
When the sci-fi epic "Final Fantasy" opens next summer, kids will rave about the evil aliens, the white-knuckle action scenes and the planet-size explosions. Adults who venture inside will leave the theater talking about something else entirely: the...
Money vs. Quicken: The Old Rivals Are Squaring off with New Versions of Software to Help Manage Your Money. Here's How to Decide Which One's Right for You
It's time to clear up some hard-drive space. Over the next two weeks Microsoft and Intuit, the two main players in the personal-finance software game, will unveil Money 2001 Deluxe and Quicken 2001 Deluxe: new versions so full-featured and elegant...
Only One Plausible Explanation
The National Transportation Safety Board is eager to close its investigation of last fall's crash of EgyptAir Flight 990. But to the exasperation of U.S. officials, the Egyptians still refuse to accept the American interpretation of the evidence. ...
Perspectives
"Miracles happen." Connecticut Sen. Joseph Lieberman, agreeing to be Al Gore's running mate. Lieberman is an Orthodox Jew, the first ever on a major-party ticket. "I think I have given evidence that I need to be in church." President Bill Clinton,...
Politics in A Macaroni Era: Bill Clinton, Who Can Cry out of One Eye, Has Mastered the Politics of Contrived Sentiments
In January 1946 Charles de Gaulle, fresh from his heroic role as France's liberator, and disdaining the banal normality of peacetime administration, abruptly resigned as president of the provisional government. Having fought for the grandeur de la...
Post-Seinfeld America: Sure, You Can Get a Bagel at McDonald's, but Is the Nation Really Ready for a Jewish Vice President? American Jews Are Greeting the Idea with a Blend of Pride and Skepticism
I was there for Shapp '76. As a young reporter, I briefly covered the campaign of Pennsylvania Gov. Milton Shapp, who ran in a few early Democratic presidential primaries that year. Shapp was Jewish. Shapp was crushed. And although there was no apparent...
Praying to Win: THE TEAM: Religion Is a Hot Ticket in This Year's Race, and Gore Hopes Joe Lieberman Can Give His Cause a Great Awakening. Al's Test of Faith-And of Leadership
In the steamy summer heat of lunchtime Atlanta, Al Gore and Joe Lieberman ended their first big-city rally as the Democratic ticket with a show of sweaty oratory that drew cheers from a tame but appreciative crowd in Centennial Park. Suit coats gone,...
Signing Off: A News Anchor Tunes Out: You're Probably Sick of Us Talking Heads with Helmet Hair and Perfect Teeth. I Was, Too. It Was Time to Leave
Until three months ago I was a talking head, one of those cookie-cutter Ken dolls otherwise known as local television anchormen. I headed up evening newscasts at a station likely similar to those in your town, so you know my type. You've seen my helmet...
Sir Alec Guinness: April 2, 1914-Aug. 5, 2000
He was the perfect person to play John Le Carre's spymaster George Smiley, for he possessed all the necessary talents for a life of stealth: a face so ordinary as to approach anonymity, a mastery of disguise so accomplished he could vanish without...
'Stamina and Persistence': Al Gore Talks about How He'd Govern If He Wins the Top Job
At his convention, Al Gore will flesh out what a Gore presidency would look like. NEWSWEEK's Jonathan Alter rode in the vice president's limo in Atlanta last week looking for some clues: ALTER: What will your first 100 days look like? What are your...
The Enigma of Autism
Our July 31 cover story "Understanding Autism" drew more than 1,100 letters, primarily from readers thanking us for focusing attention on what many consider an epidemic. "Your article will reach and educate millions of people who have never before...
The Family Business: The Clans: 'Dynasty' Seems More of a Republican Word, but There Are Just as Many, If Not More, Democratic Families Who Have Chosen to Give Their Lives to Politics and Public Service through the Generations. as Vice President Al Gore-Himself the Son of a U.S. Senator-Evokes the Kennedy Magic in Los Angeles This Week, He Will Be Drawing on a Deep Party Tradition. an Exclusive Photo Gallery
Forty years ago, John F. Kennedy stood at the podium of a Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles and summoned a new generation to the forefront of American politics. His symbol was his old Navy patrol boat, PT-109, and the enlisted men and young...
The Lord of the Rings: A 'Bad Boy' Gymnast Is America's Hope for Olympic Gold
The three earrings came off first, followed by the eyebrow ring. Next he yanked out the tongue stud and stuck it in an envelope for his dad, "so he'd finally stop yapping about it." The blond streaks in his hair have grown out, and only the edges of...
The Precarious Prince: THE MAN: At First Glance Al Gore, Child of a Stentorian Senator and a Formidable Mother, Seems to Have Been Born to Power-The 'Prince Albert' of Tennessee and Washington. but His Rise Was No Royal Progress. the Climb of a Son Who Didn't Think He Had the Option of Slipping
At St. Albans, the tony prep school he attended in Washington 35 years ago, Albert Gore Jr. appeared, at least from a distance, to be a prince among princes. Even in a place populated by other ruling-class scions, Gore stood out. The class of '65 yearbook...
The Rabbi's Daughter: The Long, Historic Journey of Hadassah Lieberman
As the sun set over her Georgetown home two weeks ago, Hadassah Lieberman prepared for the Sabbath meal as she did every Friday, lighting candles and singing prayers with family and friends. But with just days left before Al Gore announced a running...
The Soul and the Steel: He Is Pious and Observant, but Joe Lieberman Did Not Get to the Top by Prayer Alone. Beating Tough Opponents along the Way, He Showed Tactical Skills and Ideological Flexibility That He Now Will Deploy in the Service of Al Gore. the Making of a Bright Pol Who Knows What It Takes to Win
I am going to Mississippi because there is much work to be done there and few men are doing it," wrote 21-year-old Joe Lieberman, chairman of the Yale Daily News, in his column on Oct. 28, 1963. Lieberman was headed south to help register black voters...
The Sub Finally Rises: After 136 Years, a Civil War Mystery May Be Solved
On the night of Feb. 17, 1864, the Confederate Navy introduced the art of stealth technology to naval warfare. As the Union blockade of Charleston suffocated the South Carolina port, the rebels unleashed a "porpoise." At least that's what officers...
Throwing the Brakes on Tires That Peel Out: Firestone Issues a Recall as Accidents Pile Up
In the early-morning hours of June 15, Nancy Dudley headed north out of Florida with her son Eric sleeping soundly in the back seat of her Ford Explorer. They were traveling to North Carolina, where 8-year-old Eric was to be ring bearer in a wedding....
Tipper: 'It's a Fine Balance': Mrs. Gore Tries to Build a Zone of Privacy in a Public Life
If Tipper Gore moves into the White House next year, don't expect her to follow in Hillary Clinton's footsteps. She'll put her own stamp on the job of First Lady, balancing her official role with her private life. This week in Los Angeles, Tipper will...
What Became of the Golden Girls?
In 1996, America fell in love with seven teenage girls. Beautiful, waiflike and made of steel, "The Magnificent Seven" won Olympic gold and took fans on a wrenching, exhilarating ride. Now, some are trying for another chance while others have called...