Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 21

401(k)s and the Enron Mess: Your Retirement Plan Might Be Every Bit as Risky as Enron's. What Companies Should Do about It
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn Now is the time for congress to clean up the mess in 401(k)s. I'm speaking specifically of the plans that offer you company stock. You tend to load up on this stock, especially when employers use it to match part or all...
A New Life Lyne? A Magazine Pro Turned TV Exec Needs to Bring Hits-And Viewers-To ABC
Scrambling to staunch a ratings hemorrhage, the Disney Co. last week appointed Susan Lyne president of ABC's entertainment division and charged her with finding new hit shows for the foundering network. Viewers--especially coveted young adults--have...
A Passage for India: Grammy Comes Knocking
Byline: Lorraine Ali When you ask the neo-soulstress India.Arie how she feels about her recent seven Grammy nominations, she just breaks up laughing. "It's beyond cool that I even produced a blip on their radar," says the 26-year-old, who a mere...
A Tree Grows in Midtown: Building a Bold, New Museum in the Scarred City
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan New York is still shellshocked from September 11, and the city's cultural institutions, such as Lincoln Center, are waking up to a sober new year of postponing their capital ambitions. That makes the stunning new home for...
A Troubled Teenager's Tragic Final Flight Plan: Charles Bishop's Suicidal Crash Spurs Scrutiny of the Way Flight Schools Train Tomorrow's Pilots
Byline: Debra Rosenberg Charles Bishop liked to brag that one day he would be on the evening news. He once told friends that a TV crew had filmed him performing practice landings in flight school. Another time he claimed a major airline planned...
Break on through to the Oscar Side: Two Hot Talents Reach Critical Mass: Jennifer Connelly, of 'A Beautiful Mind', and Todd Field, Who Brought Us 'In the Bedroom'
Byline: Jeff Giles and David Ansen There are two questions Jennifer Connelly gets asked with a punishing regularity, neither of which has anything to do with Jennifer Connelly. She's asked what it was like to work with Russell Crowe, and she's asked...
Death in a Proxy War: India Rightly Blames Pakistan for Kashmir Violence, but It Also Has a Homegrown Problem
Byline: Joshua Hammer Nazir Ahmad Khan's life as a Kashmiri terrorist--or freedom fighter--lasted all of a few days. It began a month ago in the village of Sanoor-Kalipura, where the 18-year-old handicrafts maker was living with his parents and...
Give the Pols a Gold Star: The New Education Law Broke the Partisan Logjam and Helped Quell a Poisonous Debate
Byline: Jonathan Alter Pop quiz: what percentage of 18- to 25-year-olds can correctly identify the vice president of the United States? The answer, according to a Pew survey released last week, is 51 percent. (Older Americans do about 15 points...
High School at Attention: In Chicago and across the Country, Educators Are Are Taking a Controversial New Step. Their Aim: To Bring Order to Dangerous, Unruly Public Schools and Coherence to Caotic Lives. the Experiment: Military Rule
Byline: Dirk Johnson Wearing army greens and spit-shined black shoes, the cadets stand ramrod straight and silent. It is 7:30 a.m., time for dress inspection. "Drop!" barks a platoon leader, spotting a uniform infraction, a cadet without a name...
It's OK to Talk about Failure: Being Honest about Our Pre-September 11 Intel and Policy Mistakes Is the Best Way to Fix Them
Byline: Fareed Zakaria All signs suggest that the war is over and won. The Bush administration posed for Annie Leibovitz's power portraits in Vanity Fair. Bob Woodward is at work collecting material for his account of the battle against bin Laden....
Learning Tough Lessons: Small Investors Have Taken Their Lumps Lately, but Rather Than Bail at the First Sign of Trouble, They're More Realistic-And Savvier Than Ever
Byline: Maria Bartiromo A funny thing happened to investors on the market's long ride downhill: realistic expectations. In the overheated '90s, some people came to expect 30 or 40 or even 100 percent moves in stocks. They got burned. As a result,...
LIGHTS, CAMERA, JUSTICE FOR ALL: Let the Sunshine In: Television Cameras Should Be Permitted in Court So the Public Can Be There, Too
Byline: Anna Quindlen In recent months cable television has carried the trials of two doctors from Massachusetts, both accused of killing their wives, both convicted. In the course of testimony it emerged that one spent his free time trolling the...
Lights Out: Enron's Failed Power Play: To George W. Bush, the Head of Enron Was 'Kenny Boy'-Until Now. as the Shock Waves from the Largest Bankruptcy in U.S. History Shake Washington, the Scandal Machine Is Cranking Up in Search of a White House Connection. Let the Enron Wars Begin
Byline: Howard Fineman and Michael Isikoff Commerce secretary Donald Evans was busy, halfway around the world in Moscow, but not too busy to reach out to Ken Lay in Houston last fall. "Kenny Boy," as President George W. Bush had nicknamed him, was...
Mulla Omar off the Record: The Driver for the 'Leader of the Faithful' Explains How the Taliban Chief Got Away-And Why His Car Smelled of Perfume
Byline: Scott Johnson and Evan Thomas One of the major frustrations of the war on terrorism has been the continuing elusiveness of Mullah Mohammed Omar, the chief of the Taliban. America and its Afghan allies have repeatedly come close to killing...
Next Year in Baghdad: Ahmed Chalabi, Visionary and Schemer, Has a Plan to Oust Saddam. Should We Buy a War from This Man?
Byline: Christopher Dickey Set yourself up as Saddam Hussein's worst enemy and you've got to be very courageous, very crazy or some kind of scam artist. Ahmed Chalabi, 57, has been called all of the above. He's also been dubbed a genius--even by...
Our Hippest Literary Lion: Cool Cat Mark Twain Gets the Ken Burns Treatment
Byline: Malcolm Jones I still remember the extraordinary rush of liberation I felt as a teenager after reading Mark Twain's terse "Notice" at the beginning of "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn": "Persons attempting to find a motive in this narrative...
Periscope
Byline: Mark Hosenball; Julie Scelfo; Karen Springen; Cathleen McGuigan INVESTIGATIONS Tracking the 'Shoe-Bomber' Connection Law-enforcement agencies on both sides of the Atlantic are trying to establish a connection between would-be shoe-bomber...
Perspectives
"Tall, straight and proud--that was our son. That's the way he went down." Bob Bancroft, father of Capt. Matthew Bancroft, one of the seven Marines killed when their plane crashed into a mountain in Pakistan "Here's the bottom line: the little guy...
Sent to the Penalty Box: One Dad Is Dead, the Other Is Heading to Jail. How a Kids' Scuffle Led to Rink Rage, and What a Troubled Community Is Doing to Keep Parents Safely on the Sidelines
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores Perhaps it was fitting that the trial of Thomas Junta ended as murkily as it began. As he stood stoically in a Cambridge, Mass., courtroom last Friday evening, accused of killing fellow hockey dad Michael Costin, the judge...
Signs of a Family Feud: The Trial of Andrea Yates Tests the Insanity Defense as Relatives Try to Cope with an 'Unspeakable' Crime
Byline: Anne Belli Gesalman In the Houston courtroom where Andrea Yates is on trial for her life, Rusty Yates and his mother, Dora, sit in one row while Jutta and Brian Kennedy, Andrea's mother and brother, sit in a row of their own. Publicly, at...
The Comeback Queen: The Blown-Out Knees and Shattered Bones Were Bad Enough. Now Picabo Street Has to Overcome Her Fear
Byline: Debra Rosenberg Tucked into the back corner of a spinning class at a Crunch gym in Hollywood, Olympic skiing diva Picabo Street works out just like anybody else. Except for the TV camera aiming a bright light at her increasingly sweaty face....
The Problem in Our Own Backyards: I Miss the Days When Country Stream Wasn't Just the Name of a Housing Development. Am I the Only One?
Byline: Sean Clancy The new driveway cuts through the trees that border my property. From my doorstep, I can hear my old friends falling; a little more light comes in my windows every day. Across the road, the SOLD sign goes up among the trees at...
The Year That Changed Us: As 2001 Turns to 2002, Readers Reflect on Terrorism and Tragedy, and Ponder the Meaning of 9-11
I have never read a better story on the horrors and heroes of a terrible tragedy than Evan Thomas's "The Day That Changed America" (THE STORY OF SEPTEMBER 11) in your Dec. 31, 2001/Jan. 7, 2002) issue. It was like an exciting novel. I couldn't put...
Wen Ho Lee: A Scientist's Secrets: The Man Once Branded a Chinese Spy Settles Scores in a New Book. but While the Government Overreached, Lee May Not Have Been Entirely Blameless
Byline: Michael Isikoff Shy, diminutive and seemingly clueless, Wen Ho Lee sat quietly in the interrogation room as two FBI agents leaned on him to confess. It was March 7, 1999, the day after The New York Times proclaimed a sensational espionage...
What's Life Worth? We Obsess over Our Retirement Savings Plans, but Many Americans Don't Have Nearly Enough Life Insurance. How to Tell If You're Covered
Byline: Daniel McGinn Lawrence Singer always figured life insurance was a bad bet. "Statistically it doesn't pay off," says the 33-year-old dentist. "You're better off socking the money away in the stock market." But since September 11, Singer has...
Who Killed Enron: It's the Scariest Type of Scandal: A Total System Failure. Executives, Lenders, Auditors and Regulators All Managed to Look the Other Way While the Company Ran Amok
Byline: Allan Sloan Enron was supposed to be the next new thing, a New Economy company with substance to it. Unlike flaky Internet start-ups that substituted ethereal yardsticks like "eyeballs" and "stickiness" for revenues and profits, Enron had...
With a Little Bit of Luxo: Apple's Impresario, Steve Jobs, Didn't Miss a Trick When He Unveiled the New Lamplike iMac
Byline: Steven Levy This year the sacrosanct rituals of the Steve Jobs keynote at the semiannual Macworld conference were slightly altered. Normally, Apple Computer assumes a corporate poker face about anything Jobs may or may not be unveiling during...