Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 11

Aerobics for Anarchists: Punkers and Other Revelers Who Would Never Go near a Gym Are Finding Fitness Can Be Fun If the Beat Is Right
Byline: Lorraine Ali It's 11 on Saturday inside the legendary New York punk club CBGB. That's a.m., not p.m. And there's no band in sight. The hulking man with the blue mohawk and tattoo isn't confused about the time of day--he's there for a workout....
Ah, the Follies of Youth: Populism Is Again the Rage in South America, along with Empty Promises. at Least One Populist Says He's Learned from Past Mistakes. the Markets Are Watching
Byline: Joseph Contreras and Mac Margolis Brazilians finally saw no choice but to risk it. Three times they had voted down Luiz Inacio (Lula) da Silva's bids for the presidency. He had scared them away with his encomiums to Fidel Castro and his...
A Mounting Toll: The Bloody Trail Left by the Sniper Suspects Lengthens, but the Search for Their True Motives Goes On
Byline: Michael Isikoff and Pat Wingert The gunshot rangout in the night. Benny Oberoi, a 22-year-old clerk at a liquor store in Silver Spring, Md., dropped to the ground. It was about 10:30 p.m. on Sept. 14, and at the time police said they had...
Backwardly Mobile M.B.A. Education: Dot-Com Stars of Yesterday Are Heading for Harvard and Other Business Schools
Byline: Daniel McGinn Imagine a high-tech device that allows you to observe people's daydreams. Now fancy wheeling that instrument into a classroom at the Harvard Business School. Adjust the dials and see where these high achievers hope to wind...
Battle of the Nordic Giants: Telecom: Ericsson Used to Rule the Industry. Now Nokia Dominates the Cell-Phone Market. What Caused the Switch?
Byline: Stryker Mcguire It remains one of the more intriguing "what ifs?" in the history of the cell phone. What if Ericsson had bought Nokia when it had the chance in 1991? One of the world's oldest telephone-equipment manufacturers, Ericsson was...
Click Here for a New Sedan! (Not Yet, Alas): Online: Consumers Use the Web to Research Prices. but They Don't Yet Buy Their Cars There. in the Automotive Industry, Will Clicks Ever Replace Bricks?
Byline: Keith Naughton and Joan Raymond Buying cars on the internet seemed like such a good idea back in the go-go '90s. After all, most car buyers would rather have a root canal than go toe-to-toe with a car salesperson. And auto companies figured...
Eurasia and the Epidemic: The AIDS Epidemic in India, China, and Russia May Be More Destabilizing Than Terrorism. Russia's Political Importance May Be Radically Reduced
Byline: George F. Will It is arguable, perhaps even probable, that the world has never known a more dangerous moment. This would be true even if the problem were only the intersection of advanced physics and moral primitivism--the potential acquisition...
Failing Grade: SEC Chairman Harvey Pitt Was Going to Restore Faith in Accounting. but His Botched Handling of a Watchdog Board Casts Doubt on Whether Any Reforms Will Stick
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn It should have been a halo moment for Harvey Pitt, head of the Securities and Exchange Commission. The SEC was naming the first-ever Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, created by Congress to help bring credibility...
Fast Chat: What a Feeling
Byline: Susannah Meadows There are many reasons to love the new film "Roger Dodger," about a cynical womanizer (Campbell Scott) who schools his virginal 16-year-old nephew about sex: It got made because Scott read the script a desperate writer (Dylan...
George W, Unplugged: A Bush Documentary, and the Life of 'NEWSWEEK Man'
Byline: T. Trent Gegax I wasn't ready for my close-up. Print journalists rarely are. Most of us happily choose to spend our careers in the spectator seats, and feel faint when we become players. Now I'm in the position of watching myself in the...
Guilt Free TV: In the Beginning, There Was Big Bird. Now, Thanks to Intense Competition from Disney and Nick, There Are More Quality Shows for Preschoolers Than Ever
Byline: Daniel McGinn When Alicia Large was growing up, her parents rarely let her watch television. Even the Muppets were off-limits, she says, because her parents disliked the sexual tension between Kermit and Miss Piggy. Now 31 and raising her...
Iraq's Black Gold: How Saddam Skimmed Oil Profits While the United Nations Looked the Other Way
Byline: Mark Hosenball Gazi Luguev vividly remembers the first time he met Uday Hussein. The Russian businessman was visiting Baghdad early last year when Saddam's elder son agreed to meet him to discuss a lucrative business opportunity. At first,...
Israel: Will a New Government Affect an Iraqi War?
Byline: Dan Ephron For Shaul Mofaz, it was a moment to forget. The Israeli Army chief had been touring a military base on the West Bank with his boss, Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, waiting to talk to him privately. He got his chance during a break...
Jack's Toughest Deal: The Legendary CEO Knows How to Win in Business. but He's Struggling against a Formidable Foe: His Wife
Byline: Keith Naughton and Geoffrey Gagnon For all the explosive tabloid revelations in the bitter divorce battle between Jack and Jane Welch, you'd think they would need security guards to keep them apart. First came the former GE chairman's admission...
Jurassic Park, 2002: Politics Needs a Youth Movement. Maybe Next Time
Byline: Howard Fineman Marty Kaplan, an L.A. movie producer, writer and teacher, assumed that he had long ago left politics, and that politics had left him. His last gig was in 1984 as chief speechwriter for Walter Mondale, who lost every state...
L.A. Rising: We Know-You've Heard It before. but Thanks to Some Fantastic Public Buildings and the Creation of Hip New Apartments, Downtown Los Angeles Is Taking off at Last
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan and David Jefferson If you stand on the rooftop terrace of the chic new Standard hotel in downtown Los Angeles, you might think you're in a real city. From the top of the 12-story high-rise conversion--built in 1956 as...
Media: Red All about It!
Byline: --Karen Springen It may seem counterintuitive to offer people more of something they don't want, but that's exactly what's going on in Chicago. Both major newspapers, the Sun-Times and the Tribune, launched new dailies last week aimed at...
Military: Getting Ready for War: Diplomats Are Moving toward a Security Council Resolution on Iraq. the American Military Is Just Moving toward Iraq
Byline: John Barry and Michael Hirsh When the U.S. Army recently gave Robert Clifford an order for another of his giant, high-speed catamarans, he was overjoyed. Clifford's company in Hobart, Australia, Incat, had been overstocked with the hydrofoils,...
Mourning a Master DJ: A Rap Pioneer's Murder Stirs Fears of Renewed Gang Warfare
Byline: Allison Samuels DJ Jazzy Jeff needed a moment to let it sink in. One of the founding fathers of hip-hop, Jam Master Jay of Run-DMC, had been murdered, and the phones in Jazz's office were ringing off the hook with friends and reporters wanting...
Newsmakers
Byline: Devin Gordon, Lorraine Ali One Nation, Under 'Jackass' Johnny Knoxville would like to make an apology. Naturally, the man is delighted that his masterwork, "Jackass: The Movie"--an 80-minute highlight reel of some of the most outrageous...
No. 1 without a Bullet: Pop or Hard-Core Hip-Hop? Nelly Worked His Way to the Top by Straddling Both Worlds. Can He Keep His Balance?
Byline: Allison Samuels Cornell Haynes Jr. looks every inch a GQ man. Young, handsome and with millions in the bank thanks to his rap alter ego known as Nelly, Haynes is only one of a handful of men selected to appear in the fashion magazine's music...
No White Hats in Moscow: If, as Fleischer Says, Terror against Civilians Is the Yardstick, What Does the White House Call the Actions of the Russian Army in Chechnya?
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Thank goodness for moral clarity. President Bush's black-and-white picture of the war on terror has apparently made sense of Russia's complicated struggle with the Chechens. The White House offered its wholehearted support...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom, left to right: New York Times, Associated Press, Indianapolis Star, Associated Press, New York Times, Associated Press, Chicago Sun-Times, Fox News, USA Today, Associated Press (3) "We could not save...
Take My Bills, Please! We Already Pay for Cable, Phone and Internet. Now Come Web Services and Apps-by-the-Month. Where Will the Money Come From?
Byline: Steven Levy There was a telling moment in the recent agenda conference, a prominent gathering of high-tech execs not bankrupt or in handcuffs. Moderator James Fallows, whose day job consists partially of writing big-think articles for The...
Technology: The New Palm: Cool, Costly
Byline: Brad Stone Tungsten, a lustrous grayish-white metal, is commonly used in light-bulb filaments. Whether beleaguered handheld pioneer Palm can brighten its prospects by co-opting the name for its new line of devices is another matter. The...
Technology: The New Spam Blockers
Byline: Brad Stone News last week that Internet service provider Verizon settled its lawsuit against Detroit-based spam king Al Ralsky was of little comfort. Ralsky agreed to pay a fine and stop spamming Verizon customers, but he still has plenty...
Television: Votes of Confidence
Byline: Tamara Lipper Still smarting over criticism of their coverage on Election Night 2000, the television networks are taking pains to make sure they don't get the winners wrong this time. The anchors, who announced that Al Gore would be president,...
The Dead and the Silent: In His Own 'War on Terror,' Putin Targets the Russian Media
Byline: Christian Caryl and Eve Conant The staff of the weekly Versiya had a scoop. They'd spent 10 days frantically reporting one of the biggest stories any of them could remember--the siege of a Moscow theater that ended in a dramatic assault...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker When he was growing up in the 1970s, national correspondent Daniel McGinn watched lots of television--most of it decidedly noneducational. Meanwhile his wife, Amy, was allowed to watch only "Sesame Street" and other programs...
The Eminem Story: The Rapper Delivers a Stunning Acting Debut in '8 Mile'R
Byline: David Ansen Fans of Eminem can be forgiven if they think they are watching his own story unfold in "8 Mile." Like Eminem, Jimmy Smith Jr., a.k.a. Rabbit, is a young, angry white rapper trying to make a name for himself in a black world....
The Virtual Aisle Tries Again Online: E-Commerce: Buying Groceries with the Click of a Mouse Was a Dot-Com Business Model That Failed. Now Two Old-Time Retailers Are Giving It Another Try
Byline: Karen Breslau Adrianna Donat remembers the day that Webvan died. The Oakland, Calif., resident had just come home from the hospital with her newborn son in July 2001, expecting to find her familiar green Webvan container of fresh groceries....
Tough Guy, Tough Talk: Over the Years He's Been Called a CIA Agent and a Communist. Brazilians Have Decided to Give Him the Title Mr. President
Byline: Lally Weymouth Luiz Inacio (Lula) da Silva, 57, was born into extreme poverty and never got past elementary school. Last week he was elected president of Brazil. After losing three previous bids for the presidency, this time he downplayed...
What Freud Got Right: His Theories, Long Discredited, Are Finding Support from Neurologists Using Modern Brain Imaging
Byline: Fred Guterl Sigmund Freud has been out of the scientific mainstream for so long, it's easy to forget that in the early-20th century he was regarded as a towering man of science--not, as he is remembered today, as the founder of the marginalized...
Why We Tuned Out: When Jazzy Was 1 Year Old, Her Babysitter Asked If TV Was OK. We Thought about It, and We Said, 'No.'
Byline: Karen Springen What's your favorite TV show?" our girls' beloved ballet instructor asked each pint-size dancer in her class. Our oldest daughter, Jazzy, didn't know how to answer. She shrugged. Her moment of awkwardness results from a decision...
Yes, That's Right, It's A Seeing-Eye Horse: Cuddles Gave Me Back My Independence and, More Important, a Reason to Talk to People
Byline: Dan Shaw When I was 17, a routine visit to the doctor changed my life. My doctor told me I had retinitis pigmentosa, an incurable eye disease that would render me completely blind by the time I reached middle age. Every year thereafter,...