Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from April 7

A Man of Ideas in the Arena: Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, 1927-2003
Byline: Jonathan Alter The voice was a dandified stutter-step of mumbled allusion and exaggerated enunciation. Yet if you listened hard enough, the erudite policy references and blustery historical detours cohered into a twinkly and often brilliant...
A Plan under Attack: Did We Start the War with Enough Force? as the Blame Game Begins, the Fight in Iraq Is about to Get a Lot Bloodier. the Long and Dangerous Road to Baghdad-And Beyond
Byline: Evan Thomas and John Barry The Abrams M1A1 tank is a magnificent instrument of war. It can move faster across country (more than 40mph) and shoot farther (almost two miles) than any tank ever built. In the first gulf war, its score card...
Grunt: 101 A Peri Primer
Byline: Adam Piore Lost in all the news? Maybe you just don't understand the lingo. Here are some words your local GI journalists are learning on their embeds. If someone asks "What's the G-2?" he wants to know "what's going on?" (a G-2 is an intelligence...
If I Want Peace, Why Aren't I Doing More? I've Got an Antiwar Sticker on My Car, but I Can't Stop Worrying That Someone Will Flatten My Tires
Byline: M. Elizabeth Dick I haven't been arrested this time around. That's because my antiwar activism is notably more muted than it was during the first gulf war more than a decade ago. It shouldn't be. I have even more misgivings about this war--I...
'I Had A Terrible Feeling': Of 250,000 Troops, Some Would Inevitably Be Lost. but Nothing Can Prepare a Family for the Knock on the Door. NEWSWEEK Honors America's Bravest
Correction: 4/23/03 In a brief bio, Marine First Lt. Frederick E. Pokorney Jr. was misidentified as second lieutenant (" 'I Had a Terrible Feeling'," April 7). He earned that rank just days before he died. Also, it was erroneously reported to us that...
Livin' Large with Wanda and Her Mighty Mouth
Byline: Marc Peyser Too bad Wanda Sykes can't read this story to you. It's hard to do her justice without hearing her voice. You could say it's the kind of sound that strips paint off walls--or a sistah-girl Ross Perot, if that didn't seem so weird....
'Love Makes Me Go Haywire': Lisa Marie Presley Talks Frankly about Music, Marriage-And Suspicious Minds
Byline: Lorraine Ali Lisa Marie Presley has been a de facto celebrity since she was born to Elvis and Priscilla 35 years ago. But the L.A.-based mom--she had a son and daughter with her first husband, musician Danny Keough--has avoided the spotlight,...
Moneymaker: Fanning the Flames: Cheney's Halliburton Ties
Byline: Keith Naughton and Michael Hirsh The stock market may be suffering, but Operation Iraqi Freedom has sure been good for business at Halliburton, the Houston oil-services company famous for its former CEO, Dick Cheney. The vice president hasn't...
Newsmakers
Byline: Marc Peyser Make MP3s, Not War If you were be-ginning to think Sheryl Crow's no war guitar strap was the only peep of protest from today's pop stars, take heart: they are taking a stand--in cyberspace. R.E.M., Lenny Kravitz, the Beastie...
Not So Safe Back Home: How Terrible That Women Who Face Sexual Assault as the Price of War Too Often Expect to Face It from Their Compatriots in Peacetime
Byline: Anna Quindlen When the news broke that the rape of female cadets had become nearly as commonplace at the Air Force Academy as midterms or maneuvers, it came as a shock to most Americans accustomed to thinking of the service colleges as bastions...
'Now We Have America': In Girde Drozna, Eastern Kurdistan
Byline: Babak Dehghanpisheh Mohammad Esmail, a 23-year-old with a wispy mustache, has been watching the snowy peaks of Shinerwe Mountain in northern Iraq and waiting. His enemy, the militants of Ansar Al-Islam, a group linked to Al Qaeda, are bunkered...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom: MSNBC, Reuters (2), The Hill, Seattle Times, The Washington Post, Associated Press, The Washington Post, Trentonian, Reuters, Associated Press, New York Times "Their determination is somewhat of a surprise...
Saddam's Bunkers: Beneath the Ground, a Realm of Catacombs and Secret Passages, Storehouses and Hideouts
Byline: Stefan Theil and Christopher Dickey When one of the most secure and luxurious of his palace-and-bunker complexes was completed in 1984, at a cost of $70 million, Saddam Hussein moved in right away. But even protected by enormous layers of...
Shining A Light on Pain
Byline: Anne Underwood The marine's voice had an edge of urgency. As he explained to physical therapist Ben Freeman of Castle Rock, Colo., in January, his unit was about to ship out to war. But his upper back was so sore that he was hardly in fighting...
Tale of a Dark Horse: Oscar's Most Thrilling, and Unexpected, Script Was Sealed with a Kiss. Here's the Inside Story of 'The Pianist's' Unlikely Triumph-And Its Suddenly Bright Future
Byline: Sean M. Smith Halle Berry stood on stage on Oscar night, preparing to read the names of the nominees for best actor. Adrien Brody, nominated for "The Pianist," prepared to lose another award to Jack Nicholson or Daniel Day-Lewis. Sitting...
Talking Past Each Other
Byline: Richard Wolffe and Tamara Lipper It was scheduled as a cozy dinner, a chance for a more personal conversation between the two wartime leaders and a handful of their closest aides, before the next day's heavy lifting. So when George W. Bush...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: MARK WHITAKER With a war to cover, we at NEWSWEEK haven't had much time or inclination to celebrate lately. But we got some good news two weeks ago: we've been nominated for four National Magazine Awards, the most coveted prizes in our business....
The Mind of the Iraqis: Torn by Feelings of Nationalism, Honor, Fear-And Now Blasted by Bombs-What's an Iraqi to Think? A Report from a City under Siege
Byline: Melinda Liu It's impossible to know exactly what hit the Shaab market in Baghdad last Wednesday morning. The Iraqi government says the explosions killed at least 14 civilians, and dozens of others were injured. Having visited the site a...
The Other Air Battle: Al-Jazeera Rules the Waves-Whether the Pentagon Likes It or Not
Byline: Jonathan Alter A lie," according to a 19th century epigram, "will go round the world while the truth is pulling on its boots." This assumes, of course, that the boots can give chase eventually. But what happens when the lies and truths (and...
The Sand and the Fury: With the 3-7 Infantry Batallion
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores Last Wednesday at around 3 p.m., in a patch of Iraqi desert where the 3-7 Infantry Battalion is camped, the wind whipped into a frenzy and the air began to glow a seemingly radioactive red. Tents strained against their...
They Fought for Stalin, Too
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Predictions during war are a dangerous business. Still, I feel safe making one: don't bet against the United States. For more than a hundred years people have done so at their peril--from Kaiser Wilhelm to Hitler to the Serbs...
War Meets the Welfare State
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson The war in Iraq is, in at least one respect, rewriting history. Few relationships are more established than the connection between war and debt. The first organized government borrowing dates to the 12th century, when...
'We Love This Country': They Hate Saddam, and Support the U.S. but Iraqis in America Feel like Suspects in Their Adopted Homeland
Byline: Lorraine Ali When the doorbell rang around 6 p.m. last Monday at Basam Al- hussaini's home in San Dimas, Calif., the 39-year-old Iraqi-born engineer and his wife had been half-expecting the visit. "We'd heard from other Iraqis who were interrogated,...
Who Do You Trust?
Byline: Kevin Peraino Friend or foe? Staff Sgt. Andrew Sorenson can't tell. A blue sedan speeds down the road toward him, weaving through the column of American tanks and Bradley fighting vehicles. He could be an ordinary Iraqi in a hurry to get...