Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from October 31

A Kinder, Gentler Conglomerate; Tata Coddles Workers, Not Managers, Yet Thrives in Global Industries as a Uniquely Indian-Style Company
Byline: George Wehrfritz And Ron Moreau (With Sumeet Chatterjee in Mumbai) A new kind of multinational is emerging out of India. It is the Tata Group, a family conglomerate that has gone professional without losing its old-school values. Forged...
America from Tom to Abe; A Hip Historian's Take on How Democracy Took Root
Byline: Malcolm Jones Sean Wilentz ends his massive history, "The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln," with a description of a photograph taken in 1865: 13 men, six white, seven black, the jury empaneled to try Jefferson Davis, ex-president...
A Second Dot-Coming; A Potent Combination of Online Ads, Broadband Speed and Loyal Customers Is Making Content Web Sites a Hot Commodity, and Media Giants Are Buying Them Up
Byline: Rana Foroohar The scramble to entertain you has unleashed the second coming of dot-coms. This time the business plans are written on legal paper (not napkins), the prospects are measured in dollars (not hits) and the focus is on media companies...
A Surprising New Sound from Motown
Byline: Allan Sloan For those of us who came of age in Detroit, the new twist in the long-running game show starring General Motors and the United Auto Workers is stunning. It used to be "Family Feud." Last week it was replaced by "Let's Make a...
A Threat Worse Than Terror; the Government Can't Even Give Intelligent Advice to Its Citizens
Byline: Fareed Zakaria (Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com.) A flu pandemic is the most dangerous threat the United States faces today," says Richard Falkenrath, who until recently served in the Bush administration as deputy Homeland...
Big Binky Brouhaha; A New Study That Says Pacifiers Help Prevent Crib Death Reignites an Old Debate. Parents and Doctors Take Sides
Byline: Claudia Kalb (With Ben Whitford) It's hard to hate baby pictures, especially your own, but Janna Bosshardt could never stand the ones that showed her as a toddler with a pacifier in her mouth. There she is, 3-1/2 years old, a piece of plastic...
Boyz in the 'Burbs; on Aaron McGruder's New Cartoon Network Series 'The Boondocks,' No One Is Safe-Not Even Rosa Parks
Byline: Allison Samuels Some day, somewhere, R. Kelly may finally go on trial for child pornography. Until then, we'll have to settle for the made-for-TV trial on a new Cartoon Network show, "The Boondocks." That's right, we said the Cartoon Network,...
Breach the Wall; VW's New Boss Says He Needs to Move before It's Too Late
Byline: Karen Lowry Miller Wolfgang Bernhard, who helped turn around Chrysler, is now head of the ailing Volkswagen brand. He's an engineer who can take apart and reassemble an engine, and, colleagues say, keep up with professional drivers on the...
Capital Ideas
Byline: Linda Stern If it's time to buy pumpkins, it's time to sell stocks. With stocks and bonds both beaten down in recent weeks, the only bright side might be the tax loss you can take if you sell while you're down. But be strategic about it....
Career Intervention: Orlando Bloom; Yes, He's Gorgeous. but after a Pair of Flops Can He Still Be a Star? Hollywood Debates
Byline: Sean Smith The crisis: He was the hot elven archer in "The Lord of the Rings," but Orlando Bloom's arrows have been missing the mark lately. He began the summer with a thud in Ridley Scott's "Kingdom of Heaven." This month, Cameron Crowe's...
China: Help Wanted; the Nation Faces a Critical Shortage of Top Managers, a Situation That Could Threaten Its Economic Boom
Byline: Sarah Schafer Chief executive Li Hsu had a problem. The head of Fiberxon, a California manufacturer of components for communications networks, spent three months searching for a vice president of his main operations, which are in China....
Coloring outside the Lines; So Painting Is Dead? Someone Forgot to Tell Elizabeth Murray
Byline: Peter Plagens A quarter century ago, when painting was supposed to be dead again, Elizabeth Murray spotted some small canvases lying around her New York studio. "I just screwed them together in a jumbled way and started painting on them,"...
Cutting the HIV Rate?
Byline: Nick Summers A landmark study with major implications for the global AIDS epidemic, published this week by French and South African researchers, seems to confirm what scientists have long suspected: that circumcision cuts the risk of HIV...
Drills and Spills; as Cheerleaders Fly Higher, Injury Rates Rise and Some Falls Are Crippling, Even Fatal. New Rules Could Help
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores (With Ben Whitford and Jessica Silver-Greenberg) It was a dream come true for Ashley Burns when the lithe 14-year-old with the blue-ribboned ponytail and squeaky voice learned in July that she'd landed a cherished spot...
Falling in Almost-Love; Claire Danes Is Radiant as Steve Martin's 'Shopgirl.'
Byline: David Ansen In "Shopgirl," Claire Danes finally gets the screen role that fulfills the promise of her TV series "My So-Called Life." As lonely, yearning salesgirl Mirabelle Buttersworth, a transplanted Vermonter selling gloves at Saks Fifth...
Google's Book Battle; Publishers Sue over Its Plan to Put Entire Libraries Online
Byline: Brad Stone On Nov. 1, if all goes according to plan, workers at the University of Michigan, Harvard and Stanford will begin piling all of their books, old and new, onto carts and delivering them into the maw of scanners furnished and financed...
Health: You Are What You Eat
Byline: Peg Tyre Bruce Morrill is something of a health nut. So when his nutritionist suggested he take a $695 DNA test so she could individualize his diet plan, Morrill, a 42-year-old UPS driver from Reno, Nev., agreed. He submitted a cheek swab...
How the West Came to Run Islamic Banks; Giants like Citigroup Dominate the Sector, through Islamic Subsidiaries and Hired Sharia Scholars
Byline: Owen Matthews You're a pious Muslim with a few million in oil dollars to invest. So would the perfect Islamic bank for you be Citigroup, perhaps? HSBC? Actually, yes. Giant Western banks--or, rather, their Islamic subsidiaries--are leading...
I Have Had to Learn to Live with Peace; How Do You Make a New Life for Yourself When You're Consumed with the Pain of Your Past?
Byline: Alephonsion Deng (Deng lives in La Mesa, Calif.) In 1989, when government troops attacked my village in southern Sudan, my peaceful world fell apart. As a boy of 7 I ran barefoot and naked into the night and joined up with streams of other...
India's Edge; Why the Nation's Top Managers Fare Better Than Their Chinese Counterparts in Global Business Circles
Byline: Rukhmini Punoose India has precious few competitive advantages over China, but one is in the corner office. It produces far more professional managers, many with global name recognition. Today's best-known Chinese CEO is probably Fu Chengyu...
Irrational Strength; How Fast Corporate Streamlining and Big Productivity Gains Have Allowed the U.S. Economy to Avoid 'Bubble Trouble' and Lead Global Growth
Byline: Ruchir Sharma (Sharma is co-head of global emerging markets at Morgan Stanley Investment Management) A little-known fact about a symphony orchestra: the oboe must first sound a particular note for the other instruments to tune accordingly....
It's Not Your Dad's Oil Story; Because We Think Higher Oil Prices Caused Double-Digit Inflation in the '70S, We Fear It Could Happen Again. the Trouble with This: The Facts Are Wrong
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson We have all the telltale signs of an inflation breakout: a big jump in oil and energy prices; an increase in the price of gold, often an inflation hedge; a low unemployment rate (5.1 percent in September, despite Katrina)...
Newsmakers
Byline: Nicki Gostin, Marc Peyser Q&A: CHARLIZE THERON In "North Country," oscar winner Charlize Theron plays an iron-mine worker who launches a sexual-harassment suit. She talked with NEWSWEEK's Nicki Gostin. Do you consider yourself...
One Crisis Too Many? Washington Wants to Help Kashmiri Earthquake Victims, but Policymakers Are Tired and Distracted
Byline: Ron Moreau and Michael Hirsh (With Zahid Hussain in Islamabad) As the giant chinook zoomed in low, U.S. Army pilot Derrick Tevebaugh watched a familiar scene unfold. Desperate Pakistani survivors began gathering in the center of Batir, a...
Operator, Give Me Hollywood Please; This Hip New Breed of Phone Company Wants to Entertain You, Not Just Connect Your Calls
Byline: Emily Flynn Vencat On the ground floor of a buzzing London office building, guys with long hair and nose rings hold informal meetings with young women in vintage blazers doodling digital cartoons on their desktops. Behind framed music-video-channel...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources: USA Today, The Washington Post (2), BBC, International Herald-Tribune, Reuters, The Washington Post, AP, NPR "It could be a lost year." Republican strategist Bill Dal Col, on whether the Bush administration can weather...
Prelude to a Leak; Gang Fight: How Cheney and His Tight-Knit Team Launched the Iraq War, Chased Their Critics-And Set the Stage for a Special Prosecutor's Dramatic Probe
Byline: John Barry, Michael Isikoff and Mark Hosenball (With Richard Wolffe and Daniel Klaidman) It is the nature of bureaucracies that reports are ordered up and then ignored. In February 2002, Vice President Dick Cheney received a CIA briefing...
Scents of the City; in Grasse, They Are the Lush Smells of Perfume
Byline: William Underhill Think of Grasse and flare your nostrils. Every ancient city boasts its own distinctive smell; Grasse has thousands. For more than 200 years, the hilltop community perched above France's Mediterranean coast has lived on...
Sheik of Speed; How the Brash Son of an Arab Tycoon Has Turned His Passion for Racing into a Billion-Dollar Business
Byline: William Underhill Starting out in business can be tough, even for the children of Arab tycoons. Just ask His Highness Sheik Maktoum Hasher Maktoum Al Maktoum, nephew of the crown prince of Dubai and son of the boss of the billion-dollar...
Shifting to High Gear; Can Volkswagen's Tough New Chief Cut Costs Fast Enough to Revive the Storied German Automaker?
Byline: Karen Lowry Miller Volkswagen has always been an icon of German engineering, both mechanical and social. Hitler planted a factory in the German heartland to build a "people's car" in the 1930s. And it did, producing the Beetle, the microbus...
Snap Judgment: Movies
Byline: David Ansen Innocent Voices Directed by Luis Mandoki The brutal civil war in El Salvador is seen through the terrified eyes of 11-year-old Chava (Carlos Padilla), who knows that when he turns 12 he'll be conscripted into the government's...
Sports: Duds Go out of Bounds; Pro Basketball's New Dress Code Is Just Part of a Campaign to Spruce Up the Game's Tarnished Image
Byline: Mark Starr In recent years the NBA has spent a lot of time defending its young players, insisting that fans would come to embrace its next generation as worthy successors to the Michael, Magic and Larry era. But as America's love affair...
Sports: To Play or Not to Play
Byline: Mark Starr It seemed to be cause for celebration: Tedy Bruschi, defensive centerpiece of three New England Patriots Super Bowl championships, returned to practice last week eight months after a stroke that threatened to end his career (and...
Terror: Counteracting the Intel-Sharing 'Conundrum'
Byline: Mark Hosenball Recent terror scares in New York and Baltimore have raised questions about whether post-9/11 efforts to share more intel among federal, state and local agencies are working. Last week a Baltimore-harbor tunnel was closed and...
The Culprits Dialed 'M' for Murder; Phone Records Suggest Assassins Linked to Syria
Byline: Christopher Dickey And Kevin Peraino (With John Barry and Mark Hosenball in Washington) Sheik Ahmed Abdel-Al was a busy man last Feb. 14, the day an enormous truck bomb in Beirut killed former Lebanese prime minister Rafik Hariri and 22...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker Reporting on health scares has always put us in a tricky position. On the one hand, we don't want to contribute to hyping threats. On the other, we like to think we can provide a service by telling our readers what--and what...
The Fight against the Flu; the Lethal H5N1 Virus Was Found Last Week in Birds in Europe. So Far It Has Spread between Humans in Only a Few Suspected Cases, but with No Cure in Sight, Global Health Officials Are Nervously Watching Their Borders and Preparing for the Worst
Byline: Jerry Adler (With Pat Wingert in Washington, Rod Nordland in London, Alexandra A. Seno in Hong Kong, Joe Cochrane in Jakarta, Karen Springen in Chicago, Claudia Kalb in New York, Mary Carmichael in Boston and Melinda Liu in Beijing Graphics...
The Flimsy Wall of China; A Health-Care System in Ruins May Be the World's Forward Line of Defense
Byline: Melinda Liu There's hardly a better spawning ground for a bird-flu pandemic. If the virus makes the leap to human-to-human transmission, the odds are strong that it will happen in China. The place is home to 1.3 billion humans--three quarters...
The Gathering Storm; How Katrina Hurt Harriet-And What's Next for the Embattled High-Court Nominee
Byline: Richard Wolffe and Daniel Klaidman (With Stuart Taylor Jr., Jonathan Darman and Michael Isikoff) The White House counsel's office is home to some of the best, brightest and busiest conservative lawyers in the country. Among their duties:...
The Gospel According to Anne; the Queen of the Occult Has Been Gone Awhile. What's Anne Rice Been Up to? Getting Healthy, Finding God-And Writing Her Most Daring Book Yet
Byline: David Gates Sometimes Anne Rice won't leave her bedroom for days on end--and neither would you. Glass doors open onto a terrace that looks over the red-tiled roofs of La Jolla, Calif., to the Pacific Ocean. A live-in staffer brings meals...
The Media: Miller's Crossing; She's a First Amendment Martyr Now under Fire from Her Own Forces. the New York Times's War on Reporter Judy Miller
Byline: Jonathan Darman (With T. Trent Gegax) Judith Miller wanted a restful weekend. Days after her newspaper published a blistering account of her role in the Valerie Plame leak case, The New York Times reporter went home to tony Sag Harbor, N.Y....
We've Been Here before; What Was the Cause, the Point, the Strategy? Suddenly Many Americans Started to Realize That There Was No Good Answer
Byline: Anna Quindlen The Vietnam Veterans Memorial is a tapering wall of black granite cut into the grass of Constitution Gardens. Maya Lin envisioned a scar when she designed it, a scar on this land, which is exactly right. Maybe someday his security...
Where the Money Goes; the $1.6 Trillion Nonprofit Sector Behaves (and Misbehaves) More and More like Big Business
Byline: Rana Foroohar If it weren't for the raffia coasters and folk art in her office, it would be tough to tell Barbara Stocking from a big-time CEO. The director of Oxfam's British operation has the power manner, and calendar: one summer week...