Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from April 10

A Dark Day Revisited; Five Years Later, Hollywood Is Betting That America Is Ready for Films about What Happened on 9/11. Are We?
Byline: Sean Smith and Jac Chebatoris (with Nadine Joseph in San Francisco and Donnie Snow in Memhis) If movie trailers are supposed to cause a reaction, the preview for "United 93" more than succeeds. Featuring no voice-over and no famous actors,...
A Dash of Fresh 'Pepper'; 'X'-Person Rebecca Romijn Lands in a Prime-Time Comedy
Byline: Marc Peyser and Sean Smith Actors can be fans, too, and they're not above lifting a memento--a prop, a costume--from the set once filming is over. When she finished her third "X-Men" movie, Rebecca Romijn walked off with an unusual keepsake:...
A Killer in the House; When Sebastian Junger Was a Baby, the Boston Strangler Was Working in His Family's House. How's That for a Perfect Storm?
Byline: David Gates You've done your usual thorough preparation before going to interview Sebastian Junger: you've put on a hoodie, work boots and sunglasses, and you've got a day's growth of beard. But here's Junger with about four days' growth,...
America's Divide; the Lawmakers See Legals and Illegals. but Many Immigrant Clans Are a Mixture of Citizens and Relatives at Risk. A Portrait of a Different Kind of Family
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores (With Holly Bailey, Daren Briscoe, Eleanor Clift, Jennifer Ordoñez, Catharine Skipp and Jamie Reno) Irma Palacios carries a faint remnant of her days as an undocumented fruit picker: a scar on her right wrist...
A Troubled Spring at Duke; A Lacrosse-Team Party Spawns Charges of Rape. What Really Happened That Night?
Byline: Susannah Meadows and Evan Thomas A few--but only a few--facts are clear and uncontested. On the night of March 13, members of the Duke University lacrosse team, at the time ranked second in the nation, crowded into a small house rented by...
Capitol Hill: On DeLay's Trail-The E-Mail Factor
Byline: Michael Isikoff Federal prosecutors investigating the Jack Abramoff corruption scandal have obtained a road map to the workings of the Republican-controlled House: 1,000 internal e-mails from the office of Rep. Tom DeLay during his time...
Fast Chat: 'She Came Home Alive'
Byline: Scott Johnson and Rod Nordland The State Department's Hostage Working Group is a clearinghouse for information about captives and a contact center for those involved in delicate negotiations. Dan O'Shea, the outgoing coordinator in Iraq,...
Fighting Back; Critics Are Calling for Rick Wagoner's Head. but the Feisty CEO of General Motors Isn't Ready to Give Up Just Yet
Byline: Keith Naughton This is a tough time to be Rick Wagoner. The embattled chairman and CEO of General Motors is facing a growing chorus of critics calling for his head. With his company losing $10.6 billion last year and Toyota on the verge...
Interview: 'He Is Not an Ogre'; the Man in Black Has No Cause to Apologize, Says a Top Member of His Group
Fatah al-Sheikh, a trusted confidant of Moqtada al-Sadr and editor of the cleric's personal newspaper, Ishraqat al-Sadr, is expected to receive a cabinet-level position when a new Iraqi government is formed. The 39-year-old Sadr City native talked...
Money: How to Get More Cash
Byline: Linda Stern High-school seniors who received fat envelopes from colleges last week can stop worrying--and their parents can begin. Mom and Dad can expect to spend more than $50,000 a year to keep their kids in classes, books, dorms and pizzas...
My Mother the Narc; Do Home Drug-Testing Kits Help or Hurt Teens?
Byline: Sarah Childress (With Ellen F. Harris) It took Mike Peterson three years to find out that his 15-year-old son had a drug problem. He'd noticed that the once-charming A and B student with a love of Superman paraphernalia had become angry...
Newsmakers: Liza Minnelli, Naomi Campbell
Byline: Nicki Gostin (Marc Peyser) Liza Minnelli's legendary 1972 concert "Liza With a 'Z' "--now restored--is on Showtime and is out this week on DVD. Minnelli sat down with NEWSWEEK's Nicki Gostin. Tell me about "Liza With a 'Z'." Campbell,...
Old Spy, New Tricks; 'Rafi the Stinker' Won the Elderly Vote. Yeah, Baby!
Byline: Kevin Peraino and Joanna Chen At first glance, Rafi Eitan seems like an unlikely kingmaker. Sure, the former spymaster is something of a legend in Israel, having participated in many of the more-colorful intelligence capers since the founding...
Perspectives
"I know it's hard to breathe. I know it is." A 911 operator speaking at 9:17 a.m., September 11, 2001, to someone trapped in the Twin Towers, from newly released recordings "I can only hope that the Almighty and those whom I have wronged will...
Sadr Strikes; Deadly Vision: U.S. Forces Once Had the Renegade Cleric in Their Cross Hairs. Now He's Too Strong-And Too Popular-To Confront
Byline: Rod Nordland (With Scott Johnson and Mohammed Hayder Sadeq in Baghdad and Ayad Obeidi in Najaf) At one time--it seems like a bloody eternity ago--there was a murder warrant out for the arrest of Moqtada al-Sadr, on the charge of killing...
Stirred, Not Shaken; What Bush's Staff Maneuvers Mean for the West Wing
Byline: Richard Wolffe (With Holly Bailey) Andy Card's face told the story. After five years as chief of staff--twice the tenure of most of his predecessors--his eyes were puffy and his skin looked gray. Three weeks ago, amid widespread calls for...
Take Me out to the Metric; the Steroid Parenthesis in Baseball History Is Ending. Last Year There Were 434 Fewer Home Runs Than in 2004-And More Fans
Byline: George F. Will Michael Bourn needs to get out more. A database programmer in Nashua, N.H., he created the Web site plunkbiggio.blogspot.com that tells everything-- really, everything-- about the 273 times that Craig Biggio of the Astros...
The Catholics: A Cardinal's Campaign; Cardinal Roger Mahony of Los Angeles Is Speaking out against Crackdowns on Illegals. How Far Will His Voice Carry?
Byline: Jennifer Ordonez Cardinal Roger M. Mahony, the spiritual leader of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles, spent last week at the Vatican, where he and other Catholic leaders helped select new cardinals. But his thoughts strayed back...
The Editor's Desk
***** CORRECTION: The April 10 Editor's Desk should have said that the photo essay accompanying our cover story profiled subjects in California and Mexico, not Texas.NEWSWEEK regrets the error. ***** Byline: Mark Whitaker In the end, it...
The Sun Has Finally Come out for Alex; with His New Cochlear Implant, Our Son Is Able to Talk and Sing. the Transformation Is Miraculous
Byline: Lydia Denworth Denworth lives in New York City. My son Alex told me about his day recently. He played cars with Max and Aidan, sang the "Mr. Sun" song and danced--a typical day for a 2-year-old. His report, however, was anything but routine....
To Become an American; Guest Workers, Penalties and Deportation Are All a Part of Europe's Method of Dealing with Immigrants-Which Has Failed
Byline: Fareed Zakaria; Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com. Seven years ago, when I was visiting Germany, I met with an official who explained to me that the country had a fool-proof solution to its economic woes. Watching the U.S. economy...
Truth, Justice and the Enron Trial
Byline: Allan Sloan (With Carol Rust in Houston) Now that the prosecution has finished presenting its Enron case, there's one thing that everyone is asking: will former Enron leaders Ken Lay and Jeff Skilling wind up in jail? The answer, of course,...