Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 22

12 Steps to Independence
Your child's departure for college is a big step. But the journey from cradle to campus is filled with countless little steps--each an opportunity to prepare for letting go. Here, Karen Levin Coburn and Madge Lawrence Treeger, authors of "Letting Go:...
Ask the Pro
Byline: Raina Kelley Raoul Felder Matrimonial Lawyer Trapped in a miserable marriage? TIP SHEET's Raina Kelley asked Felder how to get out with your dignity and your shirt. Let's say you want to ask your partner for a divorce. What's the...
Beliefwatch: Good Word
Byline: Steven Waldman Jesus has always been able to move product, especially books. On average, every 1.6 seconds a new English-language Bible is purchased. Joel Osteen's "Good News" philosophy just earned him a multimillion-dollar book contract....
Big Bucks, Big Thinker; Whether He's on a Trip to China or to the Local Wal-Mart, Jim Breyer Is Always on the Lookout for New Ideas
Byline: BRAD STONE Most venture-capital deals are closely scrutinized in Silicon Valley, but one in particular last year was viewed with skepticism. High-profile venture-capital firm Accel Partners and its managing partner, Jim Breyer, invested...
Celebrity News. in Haiku
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh, Devin Gordon, Jac Chebatoris The never-ending lava flow of celebrity journalism has long troubled us. This week, in a new feature devoted to our artistic side, we relate the hottest possible news in the fewest possible words....
Edgar and the Indies; Thanks to an Aggressive Distribution Strategy, Warner Music Dominates the Hottest Segment of the Industry
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts The name--Arctic Monkeys--is a dead giveaway. Yes, it's an "indie" band--none of that image-molding, superstar-making machinery of a major music corporation for these four chaps. The U.K. alternative-rock act first got...
Griping about Gas Prices ... in a New SUV; Crisis? What Crisis? Fuel Use Rises, Escalade Sales Soar
Byline: Keith Naughton With all the histrionics about rising gas prices coming out of Washington these days, SUVs must be an endangered species in our nation's capital, right? Well, not exactly. At Capitol Cadillac, just inside the Beltway, SUVs...
'His Brother Was Worse!'; What Has Taken Away the Republicans' Brio Are Republicans' Choices That Have Confused Their Voters-Choices about Iraq and Spending
Byline: George F. Will Twelve days before the 2004 election, James Carville was feeling his oats. In a Beverly Hills living room, he told a cohort of Hollywood liberals they could begin savoring a happy ending to the movie "John Kerry Runs for President":...
Hold the Phone; Big Brother Knows Whom You Call. Is That Legal, and Will It Help Catch the Bad Guys?
Byline: Mark Hosenball and Evan Thomas (With Michael Hirsh, Michael Isikoff, Daniel Klaidman, Richard Wolffe, Holly Bailey and John Barry) In the difficult days after 9/11, White House officials quietly passed the word through Washington's alphabet...
Iraq Films: The View from Here
Byline: Rod Nordland Everybody had a camera, and if they didn't have it, by the time you left they did," says Sgt. Steve Hicks in "Combat Diary: the Marines of Lima Company," the best in a newly crowded field of documentaries on Iraq. Lima Company's...
Island Fever; This Season, 'Lost' Had Its Share of Setbacks and Frayed Nerves, but It's Still the Coolest Show on TV. NEWSWEEK Hits the Beach for the Wild Finale
Byline: Marc Peyser To get to the set, you have to drive 45 minutes north of Honolulu, and you have to know where you're going. There's no sign--they don't call it "Lost" for nothing--just a red flare stuck in a dirt road past some pineapple and...
It Can Pay to Be Green; Cleaner Air Means Profits at the Climate Exchange
Byline: Karen Breslau Dennis Haubenschild's holsteins produce nearly 60,000 pounds of milk a day, providing the Minnesota farmer with annual revenue of about $2 million. The cows also produce 20,000 gallons of manure daily, which, believe it or...
McCain's Right Flank; the GOP's Top Dog for '08 Has Some Fences to Mend
Byline: Richard Wolffe, With Holly Bailey Last fall, Jerry Falwell asked for an audience with an old foe who once called him one of "the agents of intolerance" in American politics. Falwell had been estranged from Arizona Sen. John McCain for almost...
Mission: Impossible III: Who's Smiling Now?
Byline: Sean Smith Hollywood celebrated the lackluster opening of "Mission: Impossible III" by dancing on Tom Cruise's grave. "There's a certain part of this town that loves to watch somebody self-destruct," said one film-industry exec, who, like...
Only the Beginning? the NSA Has Our Phone Records-But It May Need a Lot More to Connect the Dots
Byline: Steven Levy To understand why the NSA wants to look at your phone bills, check out the work of Valdis Krebs, an expert on "social-network analysis." By mapping the connections of Nawaf Alhazmi and Khalid Almihdhar, two men that the CIA had...
Our New Pen Pal; Bush Has Been Clear on Iran: No One-on-One Talks. but with No Good Military Options, and Tehran's Putting out Feelers, Will That Change?
Byline: Michael Hirsh (With Maziar Bahari in Tehran and John Barry and Dan Ephron in Washington) Americans and Iranians don't talk to each other--officially, anyway. Apart from a furtive arms-for-hostages deal in the Reagan era, the two sides haven't...
Perspectives
"Our efforts are focused on links to Al Qaeda ... " President George W. Bush, on recent reports that the National Security Agency is collecting records of phone calls of ordinary U.S. citizens "What is asked of the political parties is that...
Polygamist on the Lam; A Sect Leader Lands on the FBI's Most Wanted List
Byline: Andrew Murr Warren Jeffs is a prophet without honor in the eyes of the Feds: leader of a polygamist offshoot of Mormonism (the church banned polygamy in 1890), he has now made the FBI's Ten Most Wanted list. Missing from public view for...
Study Hard and You, Too, Can Deliver Pizza; People Might Say I'm Crazy to Waste My Education, but I Have What Most of Them Don't: A Job I Love
Byline: Kathy Kallenbach Clark (CLARK lives in Newark, Dela.) I'm a 43-year-old mother of three young kids with a Master of Science degree. I also deliver pizzas for a living. I started doing it after staying home with my children for four years....
Technology: The Games We'll Play
Byline: N'Gai Croal For boys of all ages --and increasing numbers of women--the annual Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) provides a peek at the latest videogames and the new machines that will run them. Here's a look at what's coming later this...
The CIA: Dusty's Troubled Trails; Days after His Boss Stepped Down, the CIA's No. 3 Exits under a Cloud
Byline: Mark Hosenball Until a few days ago, Kyle (Dusty) Foggo was one of the most feared men at the CIA. A hot-tempered former cop, Foggo was chosen by CIA Director Porter Goss to be the powerful No. 3 man at the agency, in charge of hiring and...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker When Kyle (dusty) Foggo, the number-three man at the CIA, resigned last week--and the FBI showed up at his office and home looking for incriminating evidence--it shouldn't have come as a surprise to anyone who has followed...
The Fine Art of Letting Go; as Parents, Boomers Face Their Final Frontier: How to Stand Aside as Their Children Become Independent Adults. Where's the Line between Caring and Coddling?
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz and Peg Tyre (With Joan Raymond, Pat Wingert, and Marc Bain) Imagine tears, lots of tears. imagine a trail of tears trickling across upstate New York. Judie Comerford and her husband, Michael, are in their minivan on a...
The Heir Apparent; Gordon Brown Is Waiting-Patiently-For His Chance
Byline: Lally Weymouth What is the future of Britain's Labour Party? In municipal elections two weeks ago, Labour fared poorly, leading to renewed calls for Tony Blair to set a date for when he'll step aside. Many Labourites want Blair to hand power...
The Long Goodbye; How Does It Feel to Be the Object of So Much Love and Attention, So Much Anxiety and Aspiration? Suffocating, Yes, but Also Safe. an Essay on Boomer Parenting, from the Kids' Perspective
Byline: Ramin Setooodeh You've been busy this past decade. It started the summer before you entered high school in Fresno, Calif. You, like most of your friends, decided to give up your freedom--sleeping in, afternoon bike rides, late nights of...
The Next Step in a Very Long March; the Immigration Debate Spurs Bids for Citizenship
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores, With Richard Wolffe Manuel Ortega didn't like what he was hearing. Though the Mexican native has been a legal permanent resident in the United States for 15 years, he grew jittery at all the talk of deportation amid the...
The Real Story of Pricey Oil
***** CORRECTION: Correction: In "The Real Story of Pricey Oil," Fareed Zakaria incorrectly reported that U.S. oil consumption has doubled since the mid-1970s. In fact, it has increased 20 percent since 1973. We regret the error. ***** Byline:...
There's No Time like the Right Time
Byline: Allan Sloan Timing is everything when it comes to Wall Street. Sometimes, maybe even a bit more than everything. That's true not only when you're buying and selling securities, but when it comes to owning a piece of the Street itself. Case...