Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 133, No. 21, May 24

Aisle Seat Bully?
On the surface, the airline industry is refreshingly simple to understand--just press your nose to the glass of an airport window and you can figure out how things work. The secrets of airline pricing and accounting, though, can be as hard to digest...
Al Gore's Best Hope
The library in the home of a prominent man says who he is--and how he wants to be seen. In the airy vice presidential residence on a Washington hilltop, Albert Gore's is painted a leafy, earth-in-the- balance green. A Naval Observatory clock reads...
A World of Trouble
"It's been a pretty dull week," said a senior White House aide last Thursday. Makes you wonder, what would it take to excite those guys? It was a week when Chinese demonstrators made the American ambassador a prisoner in his residence. It was a week...
Balancing Bear
A man who for years toiled loyally at his side was asked recently what really matters to Boris Yeltsin--what motivates him in his final year in office. He answered with the following story: when the president awoke from quintuple-bypass heart surgery...
Don't Show Me the Money
To hear all the backstage chatter, you might guess the only thing standing between George W. Bush and the White House is the weighty issue of whether he was ever photographed naked standing on a bar in the 1970s. As long as Bush hadn't been "livin'...
Fun City
The next stage in the battle to anesthetize your kids took place in Los Angeles last week, at E3, the annual gathering of the $15 billion-a- year videogame industry. While actors wandered the crowd in the guise of popular game characters, 400 companies...
Gold-Plated Typewriters
Money and journalism aren't supposed to mix. It's a tension, after all, that's been part of newspaper lore since "The Front Page.'' In the 1994 movie "The Paper,'' for example, Robert Duvall, playing the gruff editor in chief of a New York tabloid,...
Good News for the Pro-Westerners?
Grigory Yavlinsky, the head of the liberal Yabloko Party, is one of Russia's leading voices for economic and political reform, and a likely presidential candidate in 2000: WEYMOUTH: Why did President Yeltsin fire Prime Minister Primakov? YAVLINSKY:...
Grooming Mr. Summers
Larry Summers, once upon a time, never could have gone all the way to the top. That was the view of official Washington. He was too scruffy, too insensitive and just too damn brilliant, arrogantly treating important congressmen like the hapless foils...
Have Pen, Will Amuse
I am among the few who continue to draw after childhood," Saul Steinberg once said, "continuing and perfecting childhood drawing-- without the traditional interruption of academic training." Steinberg, who died in New York last week at the age of 84,...
I Don't like What You're Wearing
My son turned 9 recently, and I am surprised to find myself party to a subtle, low-grade tussle with him over his clothes. In the last few months he has taken up a style of dressing that, for reasons not entirely clear to me, I do not particularly...
In Love in London Town
So you can't get into "Star Wars"--or you've read the reviews and no longer want to. Half of Hollywood is hoping to catch you on the rebound, but "Notting Hill" is the first place you should turn. Roger Michell's adorable, if uneven, romantic comedy...
It Helps to Be Able to Laugh
Just before leaving for a campaign swing in Iowa last Saturday, Vice President Al Gore talked to NEWSWEEK's Howard Fineman about his struggling campaign, his little-noticed sense of humor and his marriage to Tipper. Excerpts: FINEMAN: Do you agree...
Letters
The Lessons of Littleton Our readers share the sorrow that struck a town and an entire nation We have a 15-year-old son who regularly skims through NEWSWEEK when it arrives at our house. This week our 10th grader read all the details of your...
Lowdown on Liposuction
Cherie Ferraris is no slacker. The 51-year-old flight attendant eats reasonably, exercises regularly and carries just 128 pounds on a 5- foot-4-inch frame. But fat has always collected on her belly. "No matter how much I worked out, this lump was still...
Meg's Potent Measuredness
Meg Greenfield said that one thing she especially liked about her friend Daniel Bell, the distinguished sociologist, was that he was so smart he made her feel like a dumb blonde. Well, Bell is very intelligent, but not that intelligent. Nobody is,...
'My Ambivalence Is Pretty Normal'
Tipper gore sat down with NEWSWEEK's Debra Rosenberg for an interview last Friday afternoon in the library of the vice presidential residence. Excerpts: ROSENBERG: How do you feel about the perception that your husband is stiff, wooden--someone...
No, Mama, Don't Trade
Forget soccer moms. They've all become money moms, itching to get rich. Feeding their dreams is some of the most shameless advertising I've ever seen, from online brokers who pretend that piling up stock-market profits is as easy as pie. Apple pie....
Perspectives
"It's high time to take energetic measures." Sixty-eight-year-old Russian President Boris Yeltsin, reading slowly from a prepared text to announce that he had fired his prime minister and cabinet "I think it's possible to defend this constitutional...
Rocks, Paint and MREs
After four days of being trapped inside his embassy by angry protesters, U.S. Ambassador James Sasser walked out amid broken glass and bags of documents his staff had shredded when they feared demonstrators might overrun the building. Still, Sasser...
Secrets of the Cave's Art
Standing before the hanging rock deep inside the damp cave, archeologist Yanik Le Guillou had a brainstorm: he would mount the digital camera on a 10-foot-long pole, maneuver it around and past the rock, turn the whole contraption just so, and... snap!...
The Jock V. the Clock
Julie Anderson was one of those dazzling childhood athletes. A ballerina, and tap and jazz dancer. A top-ranked gymnast and a competitive freestyle skier. Aside from an ankle injury, her body was just about invincible. But last August, Anderson turned...
The outside Shot
When Bill Bradley pulls up in a green minivan at the high school in Londonderry, N.H., there's no traffic-stopping motorcade. Instead, Bradley unfolds his 6-foot-5 frame and meets with 50 voters squeezed into the chairs of an empty classroom. What...
Tipper Steps Out
It was Tipper Gore's first solo campaign outing of the year, a daylong sprint across New Hampshire on a miserable snowy day in January. Mrs. Gore cheerfully trudged from hospital to meeting hall, shaking hands, talking up her husband--and giving voters...
Visible Once Again
After novelist Ralph Ellison's death in 1994, his widow led John F. Callahan, Ellison's literary executor, into the writer's study. She showed him the hardbound notebooks, the manila folders, the computer disks, the hundreds of notes scrawled on the...
Whose Life Is It Anyway?
Say you're a very famous writer and also a very famous recluse. You refuse to publish your stories anymore, and you live way up in New Hampshire in a lonely house and it's very tough to meet--well, girls. What do you do? You write letters, sometimes...
Wounded Pride, the Clinton Agenda
When Chinese troops stormed into Tiananmen Square in 1989, they quickly pulled down the students' soaring statue--the "Goddess of Democracy"-- which had become a sentimental link between the young protesters and their American supporters. Last week...
Yeltsin's Loyal Fireman
Sergei Stepashin has the baby-faced looks and shy manner of a schoolboy, but don't be deceived. At 47, he is best known as a ruthless hawk who helped push Russia into the bloody Chechen war and then commanded forces there himself--once hitching a ride...