Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 24

A City That Echoes Eternity: For Billions, Jerusalem Is Not Just Sand and Stone but Sacred-A Place of the World, and beyond It
One man, Jesus warned, cannot serve two masters. Yet Jerusalem is sacred stone and soil to Jew and Christian and Muslim alike. A place on the map like any other city, Jerusalem exists more vividly, more powerfully, more dangerously within the longitude...
Al's Family Matters: Yes, Focus Groups and Consultants Help Shape Him-But above All, the Vice President Relies on a Tight Circle of Trusted Kin
Last summer Vice President Al Gore asked his brother-in-law, Frank Hunger, to look at the finances of his troubled presidential campaign. Hunger didn't like what he saw. Spending was on a pace that would leave Gore penniless before the end of the primary...
And the Beatz Don't Stop: The Multiplatinum Man Behind the Ruff Ryders
Rap producer Swizz Beatz is maneuvering his S500 Benz 2000 through Manhattan's rush-hour traffic, blasting his newest masterpiece, the Ruff Ryders' "Ryde or Die Vol. II," and negotiating his next project via mobile phone. His 4-year-old stepbrother...
A Neutron Bomb in Bookland: Jack Welch, Who Built GE into the World's Most Valuable Company, Gets a Record-Breaking Advance
No doubt about it--Jack Welch is a bankable CEO. He's added hundreds of billions of dollars in stock-market value to GE, and by all accounts he sets the performance standard for CEOs. But here's a $7.1 million question: is Welch a bankable author?...
'As Good as Anybody Else': Honoring the Courage of WWII's 'Buffalo Soldiers'
The returning heroes slowly climbed the Tuscan hill town's cobbled streets. "Ben tornato!" the villagers of Sommacolonia called out to the elderly black Americans: "Welcome back!" The honored visitors were veterans and relatives of the U.S. Army's...
At the Heart of a Historic Movement: Cesar Chavez Brought about Social Change with the Help of People like My Dad. but at What Cost?
When my friend's daughter asked me if I knew anything about the man her school was named after, I had to admit that I did. I told her that in California there are at least 26 other schools, 17 streets, 7 parks and 10 scholarships named after Cesar...
Cyberscope
HOT PROPERTY AN ACTION GAME THAT TAKES BRAINS Deus Ex ($49.95; Eidos, 415-547-1200) offers a much more cerebral experience than most PC games. The setting is our own world in a dark near future. Torn apart by a global class struggle, the people...
Fast Times, Big Talk: In a Long-Awaited Duel, Michael Johnson and Maurice Greene Will Meet This Week to Decide Who Owns the 200-Meter High Road to Sydney
It may be the most exciting 20 seconds in sports. No, not Mike Tyson's next fight--although this showdown, like a heavyweight bout, will feature two undisputed world champions, a ton of trash talk and even a prime-time-TV showcase. This contest will...
Following the Money: New Clues on the Trail of Cash, Oil and Politics
It's a story, as one former oil lobbyist in Washington puts it, that "a lot of people in this town wish would go away." And it's not hard to see why. It involves at least three giant, politically influential American oil companies; the leaders of an...
Horseplay and High Stakes: Arafat and Barak Sat Down Together like Old Friends, but It's Getting Harder to Keep Up the Good Humor
These are people who want to kill each other? Ehud Barak and Yasir Arafat are supposed to be locked in a mortal struggle for the destinies of their people. Instead, in the mountains of Maryland last week, they looked like a couple of guys frolicking...
It's a Mutant, Mutant World: The X-Men Have Been the Stars of Marvel Comics for Decades. Now Our Heroes Finally Claw Their Way to the Big Screen in Bryan Singer's Sci-Fi Adventure
Puberty can make anybody feel like a mutant. But young Rogue (Anna Paquin) has got it particularly bad: she recently discovered that if she touches people for too long, she drains their life force and they die quaking in pain. Dating, clearly, is a...
Lighting into Big Tobacco: A Jury's Staggering $145 Billion Damage Award May Not Stand, but It Signals What Could Be a Grim New Legal Era for the Once Invincible Cigarette Marketers
Even the judge was startled. As he unfolded the verdict sheet and got his first look at the history-making $145 billion penalty handed down against the tobacco industry last week, Florida state court Judge Robert Kaye hesitated. His first impulse was...
Loud and Everclear: A Hard-Rock Trio Packs Its Bags for a Nostalgia Trip
Art Alexakis is getting this rock-star thing all wrong. For starters, he's a morning person. "Ever since my daughter was born"--that was eight years ago--"I just can't sleep past six," says the Everclear front man at 8 a.m. on a recent Los Angeles...
Mail Call
Many readers of our July 3 cover story on childhood obesity shared their personal struggles with having been, or still being, a fat kid. "Every word of your article struck home," wrote a 51-year-old man recuperating from coronary-bypass surgery. "As...
Music on the Mind: Scientists Are Finding That the Human Brain Is Pre-Wired for Music. Could This Sublime Expression of Culture Be as Much about Biology as Art?
If you were to peek inside Sandra Trehub's lab, you might easily mistake it for one of those obnoxious superbaby classes. Beaming 6- to 9-month-olds sit transfixed in a parent's lap as a few seconds of melody pours from the speakers, and become more...
Newt's New Cyberworld: The Fallen Speaker Starts over Again in Silicon Valley
Celia's, a Mexican restaurant in Palo Alto, Calif., is usually packed with the who's who of Silicon Valley: young dot-comers in black, venture capitalists and Nobel Prize winners in jeans. On a recent evening Chelsea Clinton is eating downstairs with...
Parents Behaving Badly: The Hockey-Dad Killing in Massachusetts Highlights a Problem in Kids' Sports: Out-of-Control Adults
It wasn't even a hockey game, on a summer afternoon at a rink in the Boston suburb of Reading, Mass.--just a "shoot around," an informal practice with sticks and pads for 9- and 10-year-olds. And Michael Costin, a 40-year-old handyman skating with...
Periscope
What rapper Juvenile needed was a little extra spending money. What he got was a major hassle. He was in San Diego last Wednesday, taping a segment of "SoCal Summer," MTV's beach-house show. At about 9:30 a.m. he and two business associates stopped...
Perspectives
"This industry has left a half-century trail of deceit, which has decimated millions of Americans." Stanley Rosenblatt, the attorney representing smokers in Florida's class-action lawsuit against Big Tobacco, on the jury's decision to make the companies...
Prepping a New Kennedy: Meet Max, the Fresh Face in Uncle Ted's Campaign and the Latest Apprentice in the Family Business
Morning finds Max Kennedy aboard the towering aircraft carrier named after his Uncle John F. Kennedy, which has rumbled into Boston Harbor. "She's your ship," says the captain, rushing onto the main deck to greet RFK's ninth child, who is visiting...
Stop Blaming Your Genes: A New Study Shows That Environment Matters More Than Genetics in Determining Whether You Get Cancer
When her sister was diagnosed with breast cancer, Joan became frantic. The New Jersey homemaker had been sure she was doing everything right to minimize her risk of the disease--having two children while still young, exercising, eating carrots until...
The Bogeyman Will Get You: L.A.'S Drive-Time Spellbinder, El Cucuy (the Bogeyman), Speaks Only Spanish, but He's the Hottest Act on the Airwaves
Tune in to Renan Almendarez Coello's morning radio show, and this is the sort of thing you might hear. A caller named Carlos has been on the air for the past three hours, desperately trying to woo back his girlfriend, Diana. Almendarez has finally...
The Limits of Immigration: The United States Cannot Be a Sponge for Mexico's Poor, Even to Help the New President
Americans ought to hope for the success of Vicente Fox Quesada, the new president-elect of Mexico. He broke the 71-year rule of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), creating a broader and more genuine democracy. He promises to attack corruption,...
The Making of a Fad: How Ultrasleek Scooters from China Became the Hottest Thing on Wheels-And a $200 Million Business
Elementary schools have long been the perfect place to study how contagion spreads. So let's focus our microscope on Palisades Elementary Charter School, just west of Los Angeles. Last November Walker Baron, 11, became the first Palisades student to...
The Real Jerusalem: The Center of Three Great Religions Struggles to Make Peace with Itself. the Myths, Realities, and Future of an Ancient City
In the end, there is Jerusalem. At the heart of the city--through a maze of alleys, past falafel shops and a run-down Turkish palace, at the outlet of a dark and musty corridor covered by a stone archway--is the home of Issa Muhammad al-Sharawneh and...
The Unfriendly Ghost: From the Man Who Brought You 'Forrest Gump,' a Thriller about an Uninvited Houseguest
This first paragraph is specifically addressed to the most pragmatic moviegoers: people who want to see something on Saturday night, and just need to know if "What Lies Beneath" is worth $8.50. Given what else is out there, sure. Robert Zemeckis's...
'We Have to Save Our People': The AIDS Conference in Durban Offered Frustration, Fear-And Some Small Glimpses of Hope in Fighting the Pandemic
Four years ago aids researchers were ebullient about the development of powerful new drugs. Last week the more than 12,000 delegates gathered for the 13th International AIDS Conference in Durban, South Africa, were more subdued. Some 34 million people...
Why We'll Miss Kathie Lee: After Next Week, 'Live!' Will Be a Little Less Lively
In the history of talk-show hosts, has a host ever talked more than Kathie Lee Gifford? Her dogs, her husband, her kids, her stretch marks--and that was all before the first commercial. Since the day she joined Regis Philbin on "The Morning Show" (as...