Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from June 3

A 9-11 Baby Boomlet: Call It Posttraumatic Sex Syndrome; Many Women Are Expecting Nine Months after the Terror Attacks
Byline: Julie Scelfo Kim and Mike Donohoe always knew they wanted children, but not right away. The San Francisco couple thought they'd do some traveling in Europe first, and save money to buy furniture. But after September 11, something changed....
A Golden Summer: Barbara Kopple's Documentary Takes on the Hamptons in a Season of Hype and Heartbreak
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz Barbara Kopple won two Oscars for her documentaries on striking miners ("Harlan County U.S.A.") and factory workers ("American Dream"). Last year, in a breathtaking change of direction, she descended on the Hamptons, at...
.... and Justice for Al: In 'Insomnia,' Pacino Is Chasing a Killer. in Real Life, He's Chasing Happiness-And Finally Gaining on It, Thanks to Twin Toddlers and a Hard-Won Understanding of Family and Fame. A Rare, Intimate Talk with a Legend
Byline: Jeff Giles You're early for dinner so the maitre d' leads you to an empty table in the farthest reaches of the restaurant, gestures to the chair in the corner and tells you, "Al usually likes to sit there." A moment later a waiter hustles...
Arafat's Money Man-And Lightning Rod: Palestinians Are Tired of Corruption, Cronyism and Shady Deals. That Makes Mohammed Rashid a Target
Byline: Dan Ephron Mohammed Rashid wasn't in the Gaza Strip at the time, but few here doubt the bombs were intended for him. Just after 1 a.m., masked men lobbed two homemade explosives into the courtyard of the home where Rashid--the shadowy financial...
A Reckoning in Birmingham: Cities Are Not like People. They Don't Bear Deep Psychic Wounds or Cry from Broken Hearts
Byline: Ellis Cose In the 38-plus years since the bombing of Birmingham's 16th Street Baptist Church, Alabama has been reborn. And in the process, Bobby Frank Cherry, once a lord of his universe, became an embarrassing relic of a shameful past--a...
Are the Feds at Sea? the Blame Game Heats Up as the FBI Draws Fire from One of Its Own and a Nervous Nation Wrestles with a Wave of New Warnings
Byline: Mark Hosenball and Michael Isikoff Blunt-spoken, tenacious and dedicated to her job, Coleen Rowley seems the model of the modern FBI agent. As general counsel in the bureau's Minneapolis field office, she urged her superiors in Washington...
Does Gran Get It on? Sex Ed for Seniors
Byline: Daniel McGinn and Catharine Skipp It could be a scene out of any high-school health class. An educator stands before a room of students, extolling the virtues of safe sex. But when Colette Vallee, a Florida public-health official, delivers...
Don't Be Ruled by Rules: Money Advice
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn Yep, that's me, in my midlife-crisis car. The crisis was that I wanted a Mercedes sports car and--as you see--I handled that emergency pretty well. As for the Jackie O sunglasses, aren't they coming back? My little red...
Europe: Make Peace with War: If It Wants to Be a Global Power and a Player in the Atlantic Alliance, Europe Needs a Strike Force That Can Fight with Our without America
Byline: Fareed Zakaria A battle is brewing over the Atlantic, but it's mostly a war of words between Europe's left-wing intellectuals and America's conservative commentators. Britain's Will Hutton fires off a book accusing America of having turned...
Evolution's Revolutionary: Stephen Jay Gould, Paleontologist: 1941-2002
Byline: -Jerry Adler Consider, Stephen Jay Gould urged in one of his best-known essays in defense of evolution, the panda's thumb. The animal uses it to strip the leaves off bamboo shoots, much the way people would, so you might expect it to be...
Fresh Legs: A Stronger American Team Hopes to Score Some Respect at the World Cup, the Biggest Sporting Event on Earth
Byline: Mark Starr Bruce Arena hates talking about the 1998 World Cup. The coach of America's 2002 World Cup soccer team wasn't there in France, he reminds everyone, when the U.S. squad was whipped three straight and finished dead last out of 32...
Fuzzy Red Lines: Nobody Can Predict If or When the Nukes Might Fly
Byline: Nisid Hajari In most conflicts, the "fog of war" usually settles in after the shooting starts. Not so in strife-torn Kashmir. There, on what might well become a nuclear battlefield, India and Pakistan know frighteningly little about each...
Going Sleepless in Alaska: A Taut, Gripping Film Noir That Never Sets Foot in the Dark
Byline: David Ansen Director Christopher Nolan, coming off the success of the low-budgeted "Memento," has made his first big-studio movie, the tense, stylish psychological thriller "Insomnia." It's a more conventional film--this one unfolds from...
Honey, I Shrunk the Store: Sensing That Some of Their Customers Are Tired of Trudging through Stores the Size of Airplane Hangars, Big Retailers, like Wal-Mart and Home Depot, Are Starting to Think Small
Byline: Daniel McGinn At first glance the Home Depot in Elizabeth, N.J., looks like the rest of the chain's 1,385 locations. But inside, it's clear the store is a new twist on the familiar big box. Gone are the shelves that reach to the ceiling;...
'King Karl' Gets Ready: Preparing for the 2004 Elections
Byline: Howard Fineman The next presidential election is two-and-a-half years away, but White House insiders, led by political guru Karl Rove, have sketched the outlines for 2004 even now. For George W. Bush--who functions best when the personal...
Letter from the Editor: We Focus on American Teenage Girls
Byline: Mark Whitaker I'm the father of a 15-year-old girl. And for years, I've been reading books and studies suggesting that she should be in grave peril. First, there was the early-'90s best-seller "Reviving Ophelia," which predicted that she...
Look at What They've Done: The Tragic Cavern in Lower Manhattan Is Not a Design or a Development Problem, but a Test of the Spiritual and Emotional Depth of an Entire Nation
Byline: Anna Quindlen The site is as tidy and anonymous now as a hospital room after the patient has left, or died. The slabs of pale concrete look like the beginning of something, not its end, as though at any moment workers, whistling, carrying...
Meet the GAMMA Girls: They're Not Mean. They like Their Parents. They're Smart, Confident and Think Popularity Is Overrated. What Makes These Teens Tick
Byline: Susannah Meadows Who called same seats? It's lunchtime at Valhalla High School in El Cajon, Calif., and the students have sorted into cliques. The Mexican-American kids occupy two picnic tables on the south lawn, not far from the stoners....
My 3-Foot-9-Inch Symbol of Freedom: Why Do I Let My Daughter Play Hockey? Because in Afghanistan She Would Never Have the Choice
Byline: Mary Charest Iorio There's nothing like sizing your 5-year-old daughter for shoulder pads to make you reconsider your decision to let her play ice hockey. As I carefully pulled the pads over her head and secured them around her petite chest,...
Newsmakers
Byline: -DAVID ANSEN with DANA THOMAS in Cannes 'Gangs' Warfare After a movie's release gets postponed three times, its budget spirals out of control and rumors leak that the director and the producer are fighting, the movie begins to acquire...
Now, Video Verite: Computer Games Used to Look like Crude Cartoons. Now They're Looking a Lot like Hollywood Movies
Byline: N'gai Croal If you had just produced the summer's biggest blockbuster, what would you do next? Take a lunch meeting with Denzel? Hop a plane to Cannes? Not Laura Ziskin. The "Spider-Man" producer is in a cramped meeting room at the game...
Perspectives
"I have no war plans on my desk." President George W. Bush, on his desire to use alternative methods to prevent Iraq from forming alliances with terrorists "They'd lower the price and ship them to the black- and Hispanic-area stores." Coca-Cola...
Selling Advice-As Well as Anxiety: The 'Queen Bee' Best Sellers Are Stories, Not Science
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz Poor Erin. One minute, she's on top of the world, the most popular girl in eighth grade, and then--bam!--in the blink of an IM, she's an outcast, a total reject, the target of a vicious gossip campaign instigated by her...
Superdollar: Friend or Foe? the Strong Currency Was a Boon in the 1990s, Lifting Stocks and Holding Down Inflation. Now It Reflects an Increasingly Lopsided World Economy
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson Call it the superdollar. On foreign-exchange markets, the dollar has reigned supreme for years. It symbolizes America's economic power--and now the world economy's potential instability. If you want to scare yourself,...
The ABC's of Eminem: On His New Album, Rap's Reigning Bad Boy Has Never Sounded So Good
Byline: Lorraine Ali Whether you see Eminem as the Pied Piper of disaffected youth or simply their spokesman, you have to admit that the 29-year-old rapper is a master attention-getter. Weeks before his new album, "The Eminem Show," hit the stores,...
The Last Prejudice: Ex-Vice Chairman of Ford Comes Out
Before Allan Gilmour retired as vice chairman of Ford Motor Co. in 1995, he kept a deep secret: he was gay. Two years later Gilmour came out publicly, but said he didn't do so while at Ford out of fear of hurting the company's reputation. Last week...
The Mouthpiece of Terror: Is Abu Zubaydah, Al Qaeda's Captured Chief Operating Officer, a Source of Real Intel-Or Disinformation? Scarily, It's Hard to Say
Byline: Mark Hosenball When would-be millennium bomber Ahmed Ressam set off to train in Afghanistan in 1998, he first had to get past the gatekeeper to Osama bin Laden's twisted kingdom, a 30-year-old Palestinian named Abu Zubaydah. "He accepts...
The 'Sextasy' Craze: Clubland's Dangerous Party Mix: Viagra and Ecstasy
Byline: Karen Breslau Adam likes to think of himself as a "safe-sex ambassador." The 34-year-old San Francisco resident, a successful professional (who does not want his real name used), volunteers at an AIDS counseling center, advising other gay...
The Siege at the Church: A Sanctuary Is Violated, but Life Is Preserved: Readers Respond to Our May 20 Issue
There was an overwhelming unanimity of opinion by the readers who wrote to us about our May 20 cover story: they were outraged at the Muslim terrorists who seized Bethlehem's Church of the Nativity, and praised the restraint of the Israeli response....
Think Globally, Skip Tax Locally: Getting Accounting Firms to Change Their Ways Is like Trying to Get Teenagers to Clean Up Their Act in Return for the Keys to the Family Car
Byline: Allan Sloan Getting big accounting firms to change their willful ways is like trying to get teenagers to clean up their act in return for the keys to the family car. They'll promise anything but will revert to form at every opportunity....
This Dog Won't Hunt: The Only Way to Fix the INS Is to Start Anew-The Way the Airport-Security Cops Did
Byline: Steven Brill The scene: headquarters of a federal agency that's at the center of our home-front battle against terrorists. A dozen staffers loiter outside, smoking and shooting the breeze. In the lobby, three federal agents, shirttails hanging...
Too Good to Be True? Taking a Look at Debt-Management Firms
Byline: Jennifer Barrett Dana Lester was running out of options. The administrative assistant in Anaheim, Calif., was buried under $20,000 of credit-card debt. Then a pitch caught her attention. For an initial fee of $1,175 and monthly payments...
'You've Just Got Bones': A Year after She Dropped from Sight, Chandra Levy's Body Is Found in a Leafy D.C. Park. Now Come the Hard Questions
Byline: Suzanne Smalley and Mark Hosenball A swath of verdant green cut through the heart of northwest Washington, Rock Creek Park encompasses more than 1,700 acres--which is probably why Chandra Levy's bones, together with her jogging clothes,...