Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 27

2004: Straight Talk: What Dems Think of the Field
Byline: Howard Fineman As the Democratic presidential race begins, a good place to get an early sense of the contest is New Hampshire, site of the first primary next January. NEWSWEEK and MSNBC last week convened a three-hour focus group in Manchester,...
Affirmative Access: Making the Grade: Bush Wants Admissions Policies to Look like His Home State's. but in Texas, His Plan Gets Middling Marks
Byline: Leif Strickland Natalie Fogiel, an 18-year-old high-school senior in Dallas, has SAT scores higher than the Ivy League's collective average--she scored 1490 out of 1600. She's a National Merit Scholar semifinalist, and she's active in Student...
A Gathering Storm: Bush Needs Blair Now More Than Ever, as Tension Grows over U.S. Iraq Policy
Byline: Richard Wolffe and Stryker Mcguire George W. Bush has a clear picture in mind of an ideal world leader and ally. Soon after his Inauguration, Bush asked the British Embassy in Washington for a bust of Winston Churchill. And when it came...
AOL Time Warner: This Time It's Personal
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts AOL Time Warner hoped to put an end last week to its three-year saga of turf wars, power plays and a gut-wrenching stock plunge. Steve Case, the company's chairman, finally stepped down. The board quickly gave Richard...
A Radical Goes Free: He Was Supposed to Be the Missing Link between Saddam and Al Qaeda. but Where's the Evidence?
Byline: Mark Hosenball Mullah Krekar denies almost everything. The militant Islamist leader, 46, talked to NEWSWEEK last week from Norway, having just been set free after four months in a Dutch maximum-security prison. He gleefully admits one thing:...
Cheating Uncle Sam for Mom and Dad: Why Do So Many Otherwise Honest Citizens Think It's OK to Take Medicaid Money They Don't Deserve?
Byline: Diana Conway Once my parents reached their 80s, I started getting an unwanted education in just how expensive end-of-life care can be. I began to discover, too, that there are clever ways for people with money to avoid paying their fair...
Con: ... but Not at This Cost: Admissions Policies like Michigan's Focus Not on Who, but What, You Are-Perpetuating a Culture of Victimhood
Byline: Armstrong Williams Back in 1977, when I was a senior in high school, I received scholarship offers to attend prestigious colleges. The schools wanted me in part because of my good academic record--but also because affirmative action mandates...
Exclusive: Al Qaeda at Sea
Byline: Christopher Dickey Accused Qaeda operative Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, captured late last year, has given CIA investigators info raising concerns that Al Qaeda's "navy" could be the biggest current threat to U.S. and global security. NEWSWEEK...
Father, Where Art Thou? Lee Malvo Will Be Tried as an Adult on Charges That He Helped Murder 14 People. If Only He'd Had One around Growing Up
Byline: Kevin Peraino and Evan Thomas A year ago, when John Muhammad introduced his protege, Lee Malvo, to an old Army buddy, Muhammad announced matter-of-factly, "This is Lee. He's a sniper." Muhammad's Army friend, Robert Holmes, had teased Muhammad...
Fighting Words, Hard Choices: Terror Is a Constant. but Claims of Corruption and Dirty Politics Have Made the Two Main Candidates in Israel's Upcoming Elections Even More Feisty
Byline: Lally Weymouth Suddenly, not only peace or war with the Palestinians is at stake in the upcoming Israeli elections. Allegations of corruption against Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and his two sons have become a key issue. But Sharon's fall...
His Kind of Town: 'Chicago' Has Put First-Time Director Rob Marshall in the Loop. Now Hollywood Is Dancing to His Tune
Byline: Mark Miller Rob Marshall arrives fashionably late for his photo shoot--a fitting at Gucci took longer than expected--kicking up an A-list flurry of activity. Slouching assistants and publicists spring to life, a makeup artist swoops in....
In Roe's Shadow: As Pro-Choicers Try to Keep a New Generation of Women from Taking Abortion Rights for Granted, Pro-Lifers Rethink Their Tactics. at 30, a Debate's New Chapter
Byline: Debra Rosenberg Karen O'Connor doesn't remember the fabled coat hangers or the back-alley abortions. What she does remember, growing up in western New York in the 1960s, were the girls who would abruptly leave her Roman Catholic high school...
It's Time to Talk to the World
Byline: Fareed Zakaria The prospects of war are rising and so is opposition to it. The American president and British prime minister stand fast, but everywhere else there is nervousness. In France, for example, almost two thirds of those polled...
I Yam What I Yam: The Sweet Potato Queen Dishes Up Southern-Fried Feminism, Heavy on the Eye Shadow
Byline: Peg Tyre The Sweet Potato Queen, wearing a crown you could see from the space shuttle, sashays into a Barnes & Noble in a suburb of New Orleans to face her public, which appears to consist of 25 middle-aged women on spring break. They...
Newsmakers
Byline: Ginanne Brownell in London; Vanessa Juarez 'Who' Do You Believe? When the news broke last week that the Who's Pete Townshend was the "legendary rock star" a British tabloid had predicted would be arrested for allegations involving child...
Out of the Time Warp
Byline: Anna Quindlen The must-see movies were "The Poseidon Adventure" and "Deliverance." The average new car cost more than $4,000. "You're So Vain" was the No. 1 single on the record charts. Airlines began a new practice: inspecting carry-on...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom, left to right: Fox News, Reuters, Scholastic Press Release, The Washington Post, CNN, New York Times, Associated Press (2), Fox News, MSN "Keep your evil away from the mother of civilization." Iraqi...
Pro: Diversity Is Essential. He Knew He Was in for a Fight. but It's a Battle the Former University of Michigan President Believes Must Be Won
Byline: Lee C. Bollinger When I became president of the University of Michigan in 1997, affirmative action in higher education was under siege from the right. Buoyed by a successful lawsuit against the University of Texas Law School's admissions...
Sony's New Day: Nobuyuki Idei Took Charge of Japan's Electronics and Media Giant at the End of the Analog Age- 1995. His Mission Is to Remake the Company-All of It-For the Network Age
Byline: Steven Levy There are ghosts at Sony. You can hear them speak. On the ground floor of the company's Tokyo headquarters is a small museum. Behind a wall of glass, on a prominent pedestal, stands one of the original tape recorders produced...
'Sopranos' Lite on NBC: Will Viewers Buy the 'Bada' without the 'Bing'?
Byline: Marc Peyser Haven't we met these people somewhere before? The husband runs the family crime syndicate but is also a loving father. The wife is blond, tough and addicted to the trappings of wealth. The over-the-hill uncle thinks he's still...
Spinning Race: He Speechified to the Right. He Briefed to the Middle. and He Sought Cover by Trying to Bring in Condi Rice. the Color of Racial Politics
Byline: Howard Fineman and Tamara Lipper No one in Washington can be as ominously sympathetic as Dick Cheney. He was that way last week, when he placed a call to Theodore Olson, solicitor general. President George W. Bush was preparing to take a...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker Never mind the irony of George Bush's opposing a system of preferences based on accidents of birth. (Even in the less competitive era of the '60s, does anyone think that a nonathletic, C-average student like W could have gotten...
The Rich and Everyone Else
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson The debate over whether the rich are being plundered or pampered is a necessary one--even if it's hard to resolve. It's true that the wealthy would receive a huge part of President George W. Bush's proposed tax cut. The...
Travel: The 'Weddingmooners'
Byline: Debra A. Klein When Karl and Kimmie Kemberling tied the knot last August, they managed to avoid many of the usual wedding hassles. Then again, the Kemberlings had to make an 800-mile trek across New Zealand before boarding a helicopter that...
What Merit Really Means
Byline: Jonathan Alter Anyone with half a brain knows that grades and test scores aren't the only way to define "merit" in college admissions. Sometimes a good jump shot or batting average is "merit." Or a commitment to a soup kitchen. Or the ability...
What's at Stake: In the Competitive World of College Admissions, 'Fairness' Is Often in the Eye of the Beholder. Here Are the Facts about Affirmative Action
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz and Pat Wingert In 1978, the Supreme Court opened the doors of America's elite campuses to a generation of minority students when it ruled that universities' admissions policies could take applicants' race into account....
'You're in the Lap of History': As He Turns 80, Norman Mailer Talks about Writing, Aging, Reincarnation, Presidential Sex and Crossword Puzzles. Another Day at the Beach
Byline: Malcolm Jones "The Spooky Art," Norman Mailer's book about writing, will appear on Jan. 31, his 80th birthday. Since his debut novel, "The Naked and the Dead" (1948), Mailer has written 31 more books. He has won the Pulitzer Prize twice....