Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 131, No. 17, April 27

An Apple a Day Keeps the Genetic Engineers Busy
The perfect apple would have the firmness of a Fuji, the crispness of a Macoun and the aroma of an Empire. It would also be disease-resistant, have more productive trees and, one assumes, fall when ripe into the waiting hands of growers. The problem...
A Special Breed of Bandit: At Their Summit in Chile, Bill Clinton and Other Heads of State Ignored Latin America's Most Pressing Problem
At their summit in Chile, Bill Clinton and other heads of state ignored Latin America's most pressing problem For Latin America's new breed of bandits, there is no such thing as a bad time for crime. If there were, then the thief in Santiago wouldn't...
Bigbrother@the.Office.Com: Your Boss Can Track Every Click You Make
Is ESPN sportszone on your hot list? Do you ever find yourself searching for long-lost friends on Bigfoot? Watch out; your boss may want to have a word with you. More and more, corporations are using software tools to track employees' use of the...
Blessed by the Bull
The feeding frenzy is in a lower key this time round. Maybe it's because even successful investors are fretting that they got in too late, and that they aren't making as much money as they could. If There Is A Homey Artifact of the bull market, it...
English Spoken Here - or Else: Californians May Soon Vote to End Bilingual Classes
Californians may soon vote to end bilingual classes Bilingual education has been for 30 years a mainstay of California public schools--the pedagogical equivalent of Ellis Island for immigrant kids. But on June 2--if recent polls are correct--voters...
Gore Tries to Find His Balance: The Veep Is Buffeted by Taxes, Tornadoes - and an Image Problem
The veep is buffeted by taxes, tornadoes--and an image problem Al Gore is not a poor man. The vice president lives in a government mansion, owns a farm in Tennessee as well as a half-million-dollar home in Virginia and earned $197,729 in 1997. But...
Iran's Soccer Diplomacy: A Revolution Is Taking Shape, Not at the Barricades, but in Movie Theaters and Stadium Bleachers
Tahmineh Milani's weary features on a whole new life when she talks about the day last November when Iran's soccer team qualified for the World Cup, to be played in France this summer. Celebrations paralyzed Tehran. Women ripped off their government-mandated...
It's 4:00 P.M.: Do You Know Where Your Children Are?
The most dangerous time of day for kids isn't late at night. It's from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m., when children are out of school and their parents are still working. This can be crime time, and prime time to get them on the right path. It's 4 p.m., and sgt....
'I Wasn't Left to Myself.' When I Was a Kid, the Safety Net Protected Me. Here's How to Put It Back in Place
When I was a kid, the safety net protected me. Here's how to put it back in place. When I was owing up in the South Bronx, I was as liable to be led astray by the temptations of the street as any other inner-city youth, then or now. Left to myself,...
New Hollywood Player: Rapper Ice Cube Directs a Box-Office Success
On the Los Angeles set of his film "The Player's Club" last fall, O'Shea Jackson, better known as Ice Cube, was barking out orders, rearranging props and instructing the cast on how to deliver their lines. He could have been any seasoned director,...
Pirates in Tuxedos: As a Fisherman in the Bering Sea, I've Seen Killer Whales Up Close - and They're Not Cute
As a fisherman in the Bering Sea, I've seen killer whales up close--and they're not cute I see you've got a poster of the enemy." The loan officer sitting across the desk from me looks up at his framed poster of killer whales with a puzzled frown....
Pol Pot's Last Days: When Death Came to One of the Century's Great Villains, the World Mourned Only That He Won't Be Tried for His Crimes
When death can to one of the century's great villains, the world mourned only that he won't be tried for his crimes He kept a clear conscience up until the end, but then, great villains and psychopaths generally do. No one given to second thoughts...
Robert Downey Jr. on Life after Jail
On March 31, Robert Downey Jr., 33, was released from jail in Los Angeles after serving three and a half months for probation violation, following a 1996 conviction on drug charges. Next stop: a court-ordered stay in rehab. He talked to Newsweek's...
Saddam's Stone Wall: Iraq Still Hasn't Satisfied the U.N. Inspectors
When United Nations arms inspectors arrived at the Radwaniyah presidential compound in Baghdad earlier this month, smiling Iraqi officials met them, offering tea. The smiles didn't last; the Iraqis were furious when the inspectors said they wanted...
Starr Says Goodbye to the Beach: Amid Allegations of Conflict, He Stays On
Amid allegations of conflict, stays on Ken Starr had his future all mapped out. He'd wrap up his investigation of the president this summer, deliver a final report on the Clinton scandals to Capitol Hill and head for Malibu, Calif.--where a plum...
Tales from the Sardine Run
Too many people want to fly too few planes. That's why airline travel has become a grueling endurance test for everyone from road warriors to vacationers. So, you think it's hell to fly? You've got a lot of company. Next time you're stuck way back...
The Animal Astronauts: Crickets Could Hold the Key to Mars
By the time the space shuttle Columbia touches down in Florida next month, more crickets than people will have orbited the planet. Think about that the next time you're tempted to gloat over the hegemony of man. Or consider that the 1,514 crickets,...
The Frank Sinatra Spectacular
Break out the broads and booze. Frank, Dean, Sammy and the boys are at it again. Ring-a-ding-ding! Why we dig their pre-P.C. high jinks. Lauren Bacall coined the name. "The Rat Pack" was her husband Humphrey Bogart's recidivist drinking circle: David...
The King of Gore: Doom Creator John Romero Has Mayhem on His Mind
John Romero should be a happy man. He is, according to GQ, "the Quentin Tarantino of computer-game megaviolence." He designed the best-selling shoot-'em-up videogame ever, called Doom. He drives a Ferrari and a bright yellow Humvee, and his hair hangs...
The Virtual Campaigners: Rich Hopefuls Turn California Politics into a Fantasy Camp
Rich hopefuls turn California politics into a fantasy camp When Al Checchi went "up" Six months ago with his first TV the walls of his new headquarters were bare and almost one more than five miles from the Santa Monica Pier had ever heard of him....
This Can Go on (Oh, No, It Can't)
Our two veteran columnists disagree on whether the bull market will continue trampling records By Jane Bryant Quinn When Allen Sinai Phoned Me Last week, I heard a lot of street noise in the background. Sinai is chief global economist or Primark Decision...
Two Girls and a Guy
Curled back against the wall, like a trapped bear cub surrounded by lionesses, Blake Allen (Robert Downey Jr.), a struggling New York actor, is desperately trying to stave off a hailstorm of verbal abuse. Everyone is screaming. Rude, angry, obscene...
Welcome to the Hotel California
R.B. Kitaj was revered and happy in London for 40 years. Then the critics took it all away. Now the painter is picking up the pieces in Los Angeles. Painter R. B. Kitaj is starting over. Last summer the expatriate American artist packed up and left...
When Drugs Do Harm: A New Study Says That Some Medicines, Even If Properly Prescribed, May Kill as Many as 100,000 Americans a Year
A new study says that some medicines, even if properly prescribed, may kill as many as 100,000 Americans a year It was to have been Jerry and Mary Sagen's first New Year's Eve together as a married couple. But on that morning in 1996, says Jerry...