Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 134, No. 5, August 2

Adding Salsa to the Melting Pot, Living la Vida Latina, Safeguarding Our Waters, Correction
You have captured the Latino pulse... its different cultures and backgrounds," wrote one of numerous Latin readers who hailed our July 12 report on Latino America. "It is not often that a national magazine gives us that kind of coverage," said a professor...
And a Digital Camera in Every Pot, Need a Charge? Type Away!, Mad, Mad Love, Now, Really Chat
KB Gear's jamcam 2.0 is built for kids, easy to use and tough to break. image resolution falls short of professional levels, but photos come out plenty sharp enough for Web posting and e-mail. For $89--and no developing charges--you could do a lot...
Apple's iBook: A Mac to Go: Steve Jobs Opens the Next Chapter in the Revitalization of the Company That Pioneered the PC: A Laptop That Thinks - and Looks - Different
Pick it up!" says Steve Jobs. "Let's go for a walk!" It's a few days before Apple's charismatic interim CEO will introduce his new object of desire, the iBook, to the world, and he's thrilled to air out the distinctive, clam-shaped consumer laptop....
'A Scandal Waiting to Blow', China: Echoes of Tiananmen, Who Accessed Lee's Computer?, If He Can Make It There ..., Critical List, A Formula for Love and War, or Maybe It's the Marshmallows, Hey Mom, My Llama Won a Blue Ribbon!, No Strikes, One Big Walk, Apostle of Peace
Since Kosovars began returning home, NATO commanders have been warning them about Serb-laid land mines. But the greater danger may have been left behind by NATO itself: thousands of cluster bomblets that failed to explode on impact. With five Kosovars...
Better Deals for Students: Price Cuts Come to Loans for Higher Education. Will This 'Free Market' Congress Interfere?
Competition--beloved by all right-thinking Americans--is slashing the cost of federal student loans. Upfront fees have come down, and borrowers can find special deals on interest rates. But instead of saluting, a lot of supposedly free-market folks...
Can Pistols Get Smarter? A Young Couple Watch Oliver Stone's 'Natural Born Killers,' Then Launch a Shooting Spree. Now a Lawsuit Asks: Did the Film Incite Violence?
Here's a movie Hollywood doesn't want you to see: the daughter of a judge from a politically prominent family runs off with her ne'er-do-well boyfriend. They drop LSD and watch, over and over, the ultraviolent Oliver Stone movie "Natural Born Killers,"...
Can Pistols Get Smarter? Imagine a Weapon That Only the Owner Can Fire. Colt's Chief Has, and He Is Betting Cops and Moms Will Buy It
Steven Sliwa was on a plane a few weeks ago when a college dean asked him what he did for a living. He stammered that he used to be a college president, then said something about being "in industry." Finally, Sliwa admitted that he was now the president...
'Damage Has Been Done': Exclusive Interview: Russia's Prime Minister on Washington-Moscow Tensions, Corruption, Communists and His Political Future
On the eve of his first visit to Washington, Russia's prime minister, Sergei Stepashin, 47, sat in Moscow's "White House" and spoke with NEWSWEEK's Lally Weymouth about revitalizing U.S.-Russian relations. The former Interior minister, whom Boris Yeltsin...
Guns in the Crossfire: Firearms Have Always Been a Part of America's Frontier Mythology. but Now There Are Cracks in the Gun Cultureand in the Heartland the Balance of Support, Even in Unlikely Quarters, Is Shifting against Gunmakers
David Koon started hunting when he was 8, following his grandfather through the hills of West Virginia. By middle age he had a modest collection of five guns, including a .22-caliber, 18-shot rifle. But his passion for shooting was transformed on a...
'He Had Amazing Grace': In a Stirring Eulogy Delivered at the Church of St. Thomas More,Senator Edward M. Kennedy Celebrated the Life of His Nephew, John Jr
Once, when they asked John what he would do if he went into politics and was elected president, he said: "I guess the first thing is call up Uncle Teddy and gloat." I loved that. It was so like his father. After the last eulogy was said, the last...
How the Navy Changed My Life: I Was a Troublemaker Who Barely Graduated from High School. Joining the Military Gave Me a Future
I still remember a good friend's concern when I joined the Navy a year out of high school. "Dude, what are you doin'? You could die or sump'n. You're crazy, bro'." I understood his sentiments. The thought of signing up for military service in post-Vietnam...
In a League of Her Own: There's No Glass Ceiling for Carleton Fiorina, Now the Nation's Highest-Ranking Female Executive
No doubt about it: Carly Fiorina runs a good meeting. Six months ago, a small group of executives at Lucent Technologies gathered in her office to celebrate a third straight year of record profits. "So, where do we go from here?" she asked, amid the...
Infamy and Immortality: 'Shoeless Joe' Jackson Was Part of Baseball's Worst Scandal. Should He Still Be Let into the Hall of Fame?
It is, and always will be, simply, The Fix. And "Shoeless Joe" will forever be the name associated with it. In the autumn of 1919, in a nation just over the Great War, the Cincinnati Reds and Chicago White Sox assembled for the World Series. The Sox...
JFK Jr.'s Final Journey: As the Families Mourn, the Search for Answers Still Goes on. How Poor Timing, Iffy Judgment and Bad Luck Led to Kennedy's Fatal Crash
Inside the church, the grief was real. Sen. Edward Kennedy's voice caught as he read his lovely eulogy, and when he was done, Caroline Kennedy Schlossberg stood up and hugged him. She bravely read from Shakespeare's "The Tempest" ("Our revels now are...
Macy Gray Makes a Scene: An Otherworldly Voice. an Out-of-This-World Debut
As a child, Macy Gray was so self-conscious about her strange squawk that she rarely spoke. Her voice is high-pitched and girlish, with a subtle rasp that hits you like the tail end of a tequila slammer. Struggling to describe the sound that comes...
Perspectives
"God bless you, John and Carolyn. We love you, and we always will." Sen. Edward Kennedy, in his eulogy at the Church of St. Thomas More in New York City "[It's] the moral equivalent of letting them go play on a freeway." From 'An Appeal to Hollywood,'...
Reborn to Run, Again and Again: Springsteen and His Band Reunite
You want exuberance? On July 15, onstage at the Continental Airlines Arena in New Jersey, saxophonist Clarence Clemons managed to sweat through not only his shirt but his suit--and he spent a lot of the show playing the cowbell. Bruce Springsteen and...
Sean Elliott Seeks His Biggest Rebound, Welcome to the Doghouse, the Aisles Have It, Mr. Springer Goes to Washington?
Feeding the royal pooches hooch has landed one of Queen Elizabeth's footmen in the doghouse, says the London Sun. The tab reports the senior servant was demoted and slapped with a $3,500 fine after a routine autopsy of a pet corgi revealed traces of...
Sex and the Single Girl: 'Sex and the City' Shows Us Single Women Who Are Anything but Desperate. They're Looking for Men, Sure, but It's Just Shopping, Not Survival
Four women walk into a bar. Miranda, Samantha, Charlotte and Carrie--a careerist, a slut, a romantic and a writer who's a little bit of all three. Four glamorous New Yorkers clad in Gucci and Versace, on the hunt for sex, hoping for love. They move...
So, How's Your Health? We've Made Great Progress over the Past 100 Years, but a New Poll Suggests We're Not as Fit as We Think
Has the 20th century been good for our health? Of course it has, you say. Vaccines, antibiotics and improved living conditions have tamed such killers such as smallpox and diphtheria. Infant mortality has dropped steadily since the early 1900s, as...
The Family's Real Legacy: We Know How They've Touched Us. but beyond the Myths, How Have They Changed the Nation?
One of the problems with the Kennedys is that so much of what is written and said about them quickly crystallizes into cliche. It then becomes harder to get a clear-eyed view of what they mean to the country politically. The whole idea of "Camelot,"...
The Last Child of Camelot: Caroline Has Always Cherished Privacy. Last Week She Kept Her Distance from the Crowds. What Does Her Future Hold?
Her parents were two of the most famous faces of the century, and her brother's heartbreaking grin made front pages around the globe. But Caroline Bouvier Kennedy Schlossberg has always steered clear of the spotlight. As the world grieved last week...
The Trouble with Virtual Grief: The Pain That So Many People Feel for JFK Jr. Should Not Be Confused with the Actual Suffering of Family and Friends
Even cyberspace weeps--megabyte-sized tears. "It's like they are part of my family," confides an America Online subscriber. "I am just one of millions of Americans feeling like I lost a part of myself," writes an MSNBC Web-site guest. Such sentiments...
The War of the Wires: Coming Soon to Your Town: AOL and AT&T Fighting Hard to Control Cable TV's Fast Internet Lines
Like most Americans, Alan Johnson didn't know a thing about the nasty brawl between America Online Inc. and AT&T over who will dominate the Internet. But earlier this month, the 37-year-old registered nurse from San Francisco was waylaid by an...
Vertigo in the Void: Flying Personal Planes Is Safer Than Ever, but Danger Can Strike Instantly
For pilots, the technical term is "spatial disorientation,'' a kind of vertigo that may have engulfed John F. Kennedy Jr. during his final moments. Wrapped in darkness over the ocean, with thick haze blocking out stars, city lights and what little...