Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 134, No. 24, December 13

A Big Bet on the Holidays: Start-Ups Are Advertising Madly, Hoping to Cash in on the Holidays. How Many Will Survive Past Christmas?
You've seen the ads: slick and trying mightily to please, turning your favorite radio and TV stations into a buzz of dot-com white noise. But if the glut of Internet holiday ads sounds a little desperate, think again. A flurry of press releases last...
A Debate on the Origins of a Plague: A New Controversy over What Unleashed AIDS
It is an ironic and unsettling hypothesis--that the effort to fight one great human scourge might have given rise to another. But in "The River: A Journey to the Source of HIV and AIDS," British writer Edward Hooper builds a case for the possibility...
After the Storm Passes: The Protesters Didn't Have Their Facts Right, and May Hurt the Very Causes They Claim to Care about. Why Good Drama Can Make Bad History
At least one Clinton official has a sense of humor about the fiasco in Seattle. The White House, he says, accomplished one of its key goals last week: raising the profile of the World Trade Organization. In fact, Washington must now wish it had proposed...
A Question of Caricature: 'W' and McCain Struggle to Get beyond the 'Empty Suit' and 'Hot Tempered' Charges
As they prepped George W. Bush for debate, his handlers considered every detail. For example, should he wear a watch? Dad had worn one in his debate with Bill Clinton in 1992. The result was disaster. TV cameras caught the president glancing at the...
As Seen from the Trenches: Roths, College Funds, UGMAs, Pensions-Who Says That Americans Don't Save?
Q: Can I use my Roth IRA to make a down payment on some vacant land I'd like to invest in? The IRA might own 20 percent of the property while I own 80 percent. I've read that people are using Roths to buy vacation rental homes. Mark Chmelewski,...
A Tale of Two Obsessions: Making 'Gatsby' Sing: F. Scott Fitzgerald's Masterpiece Becomes an Opera
If you were one of John Harbison's music students at MIT, you'd want a resume like his when you were 60. Pulitzer Prize, MacArthur "genius" grant, gigs as visiting composer, 40-odd pieces recorded. And now, your big shot at immortality: a commission...
Back on the Slippery Slope: The 'New' Gore Loses Some Ground in New Hampshire
The "new" Al Gore was in full flower last week for New Hampshire audiences. He listened, he shared, he offered his credentials as a regular guy, like his fondness for "The Simpsons" and his days in an Alabama trailer park. But the old Gore--the one...
Back to Paradise with Audra: In 'Marie Christine,' McDonald Turns Murder into Music. Can She Also Turn It into Another Tony?
Hockey has the hat trick. Horse racing has the Triple Crown. And the theater has Audra McDonald. McDonald is the only performer in history to win three Tony Awards for her first three shows: "Carousel," "Master Class" and "Ragtime." It's an amazing...
Countdown to the Millennium Bug's Big Night
Will the year 2000 bug bite or fly quietly into the night? It may depend on where you live. Recent polls show that Americans are less and less worried that critical systems will fail. But as fear wanes in the States, trepidation is peaking overseas,...
Death in Monaco: Two Hooded Intruders Allegedly Break into an Exclusive Enclave, Set a Fire-And Kill a Famous International Banker. Who Wanted Edmond Safra Dead?
From the front, on the elegant Boulevard Ostende, the Belle Epoque Building looks like a six-story fortress--an impregnable haven for the rich and reclusive. But around the back of the building, one can see how it might have been possible for intruders...
Green Christmas: For That Special Investor in Your Life, There Is a Wealth of Gift Choices. Here Are Some Suggestions for Those Who Consider Stocks the Ultimate Stocking Stuffer
It's beginning to look a lot like that time of year when you spend yourself silly. And if you're having trouble managing your own money, you can at least help your friends and relatives handle theirs. This year, give a fiscally focused gift. The stores...
Hard of Hearing: The National Security Agency Has Fallen Behind in the High-Tech Battle against Terrorists, Hackers and Other Threats
In the 1998 movie "Enemy of the State," rogue operators from the supersecret National Security Agency (NSA; sometimes known as No Such Agency) assassinate a U.S. congressman who's trying to limit the NSA's electronic spooks' ability to listen in on...
How a Madman Changed Our Lives: When a Gunman Drove through Our Quiet Town on a Shooting Spree, He Shattered Our Sense of Peace
Two years ago I started high school in a peaceful suburb on the North Side of Chicago. I was terrified at first (as many freshmen are) to make the leap into this new stage of my teenage years. Luckily things began wonderfully. I adjusted to the new...
Hustling for the Hall: Cast out of Baseball a Decade Ago, Pete Rose Heard the Cheers Again This Year. America Seems Ready to Forgive. So Now He's Trying to Dive Back In-Headfirst, as Usual. and His Odds Still Don't Look Good
As charm offensives go, the gambit carried more offense than charm. Pete Rose, the former Cincinnati Reds star who is banned from baseball, last week took his ongoing case for reinstatement to the people. Specifically, he took it to the people who...
Lessons from the Frontier: Ominous Silence from the $165 Million Mars Polar Lander
Educators call them "teachable moments"--instances such as a child's getting into a schoolyard brawl, or cheating on a test, which present an opportunity for him to learn right from wrong and profit from his mistakes. Much to its dismay, NASA spent...
Meet the New Net Boss: Changing Teams: A Corporate Defector on How the Web Is Similar to a Good Pickup Football Game
For most of the '90s, Bob Bowman lived the life of a Big Business wheeler-dealer. As president of ITT Corp., he bossed thousands of employees; orchestrated big deals, like the $1.7 billion acquisition of Caesar's World casinos, and fought off a hostile...
Missing the 9-to-5 Routine: Burnout Factor: Some Defectors Already Regret Taking on the Stress and Grueling Hours of Web Jobs
Jonathan Harris was determined to be part of the migration to the enticing land of high tech. Last year Harris left the hair-accessories firm he'd cofounded to manage a high-tech design firm called Brilliant Media in San Francisco. He lasted just seven...
Perspectives
"At Woodstock, people were there to have a good time. People are here to change the world." Kristen Schmitz, 20, one of 38,000 protesters at the World Trade Organization conference in Seattle "It is now possible to believe that the day of the gun...
Rap Takes Another Big Hit: On the Eve of a Hotly Anticipated CD, Rapper Jay-Z Is Accused in a Nightclub Stabbing
At first Jay-Z insisted he didn't want a party for his new album. Then, about a week and a half ago, one of the world's biggest-selling rappers suddenly changed his mind, and by last Wednesday night his people had made it happen: rented New York City's...
Secrets from the Grave: Just 15 Miles South of the U.S. Border, Officials Are Searching for the Bodies of Victims Killed during a Vicious Drug War
Unlike his rival drug lords, Amado Carrillo Fuentes never liked public executions. They attracted too much attention. Carrillo preferred to make people he viewed as a threat disappear. And during his tenure as kingpin of the multimillion-dollar Juarez...
The Executioner's Song: A Mix of Mysticism and Melodrama on Death Row
Looking back on his long life, the former death-row prison guard Paul Edgecomb (Tom Hanks) reckons he never saw the likes of John Coffey (Michael Clarke Duncan), the convicted killer who arrived in shackles at his Southern prison one day in 1935. A...
The 'Haunting Memories': Eight Months after the Tragedy, the Principal of Columbine High School Is Trying to Put His Institution Back Together
On the surface, anyway, Columbine High School has returned to normal. All the shattered glass has been replaced and the bullet holes--hundreds of them--have been patched and painted over. The library area, where many of Dylan Klebold's and Eric Harris's...
The Inalienable Right to Whine
Call me a cockeyed optimist, but I think it's time to retire the chicken. You remember the chicken. It showed up most conspicuously in the 1992 presidential campaign, when a couple of Clinton guys in a bar decided to rent a chicken suit and trail George...
The Internet Brain Drain: The Exodus: It's Not Just the Kids Anymore. Corporations Are Losing Some of Their Brightest Stars to Net Companies. How Big Business Is Beginning to Fight Back
Few newspapers cover the high-tech world better than the San Jose Mercury News. Its Internet-savvy reporters regularly break stories and win awards. But lately their expertise has become a liability. In the past year, 11 of the paper's best writers...
The Mayor Mixes It Up: Willie Brown Faces a Tough Populist Challenge
Willie Brown, nattily attired as always, sweeps into an elementary-school auditorium in San Francisco's middle-class West Portal district. The mostly white, conservative crowd erupts in a standing ovation as "Da Mayor" enters the hall. But Brown isn't...
The Net Goes Mainstream: New Tricks: As Traditional Companies Wake Up to the Web, We'll All Be Working for a Dot-Com
The thing that the U.S. economy does best is change. Just about the time that it looks like something will go on forever and transform life as we've known it, we discover that the market has adapted. Which is why the conventional wisdom frequently...
The New Defectors: As Increasing Numbers of Ultra-Orthodox Jews Leave the Fold, the Government Is Offering to Help
To most people, it would hardly seem like an act of rebellion. When he was 16, Noam waited for his parents to leave the house for prayers at the local synagogue. Then he pulled the shades down in his bedroom and excitedly turned the overhead light...
The New Radicals: Seattle Wasn't Exactly the '60S, but, along with the Tear Gas, There Is a Whiff of a Very '90S Radicalism in the Air. Behind the New Face of Protest
Tom Hayden, California state senator, ex-husband of Jane Fonda, cofounder of Students for a Democratic Society, author of the first draft of the Port Huron statement in 1961 and defendant 30 years ago in the Chicago Seven trial, was marching down a...
The Next Big Blue Thing: IBM Unveils Plans to Build a Superdupercomputer
IBM stunned the world two years ago when its computer named Deep Blue beat the best chess player, Garry Kasparov, in a symbolic defeat of mankind that many thought unthinkable. Today Deep Blue sits in an air-conditioned lab, enjoying semiretirement...
The Siege of Seattle: In a Ruckus over Foreign Trade, a Surge of Violence Rocks the Placid '90S. What Does This Odd Coalition of Globo-Protesters Really Want?
The nose-ringed young woman in the thick knit poncho looked admiringly at the twisted letters on the marquee of the Nike store. "Man," she said, "they f----d that up good!" Nearby, two young men stood chest to chest, screaming in each other's faces,...
The Stealth Power Brokers: If You Think Business and Conservative Lobbies Are Washington's Biggest Players, Guess Again
The most revealing thing about political scientist Jeffrey Berry's recent book ("The New Liberalism: The Rising Power of Citizen Groups") is that hardly anyone noticed it, even though its conclusion starkly contradicts conventional wisdom. After much...
Toying with the R Word: Reform Is an Old Idea in the GOP-So Why Does Much of the Party Still See It as a Weakness?
Chuck Hagel, a conservative Republican senator from Nebraska, was recalling his meetings with conservative constituents back home. "I got many questions from voters about health care, patient's bill of rights, Social Security," Hagel recalls. "But...
Why AT&T Is Feeding Ducks: CEO Mike Armstrong Wants His Share Price Up, So He's Giving the Market What It Wants: Tracking Stock
AT&T tells the world that it's a "broadband communications" company ready to serve your every need, be it a wireless phone, long-distance service, an Internet connection or cable TV. In reality, though, what AT&T has really become is a marketing...
WWF Tones Down Its 'SmackDown' Act
Four wrestlers, clad in black T shirts bearing the legend suck it, are explaining to a packed arena how they spent a recent Monday night. They direct everyone's attention to a video screen, then roll footage of what appears to be two of them sexually...