Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from April 2

A Captain's Story: Scott Waddle's PR Savvy Made Him a Poster Boy for the New Navy. It Also Cost Him His Career
For many years, Naval Academy graduates who wanted to sail in submarines had to endure an interview with Adm. Hyman Rickover, the arbitrary, irascible father of the nuclear Navy. Rickover liked to torment his would-be charges with trick questions....
A Diamond in Orange County: If Darin Erstad's Angels Were to Win the World Series, Where Would They Have Their Parade?
Tempe, Ariz.--Out here where the desert sun almost makes the dry air crinkle like cellophane, the best baseball player you know next to nothing about is preparing for his fourth full season. His team does its spring training in Diablo Stadium. That...
A Nuclear Power Play: Industry Lobbyists at Its Side, Team Bush Contemplates Jump-Starting the Flagging Nuclear-Plant Business
Dick Cheney isn't the kind of politician you'd expect to see on "Hardball," the loud and rude cable-TV talk show. Host Chris Matthews likes to yell at his guests and make them squirm. Solemn Cheney doesn't go in for that sort of thing. But when Matthews...
Breathing Room in the Balkans: NATO's Battle to Keep the Peace May Be Stifling the People It's Trying to Protect. Here's a Way Out
Here we go again. Like clockwork the latest crisis in the Balkans has produced the usual flurry of calls to action. NATO is urged to crack down on the separatists in Macedonia and reinforce its government. In other words, to get things back to normal....
Cyberscope
HOT PROPERTY Quake for Kids--From Disney Another summer, another Disney animated movie. This year's model, "Atlantis: The Lost Empire," draws its inspiration from both the legendary sunken city and swashbuckling adventure movies like "Raiders of...
Do You Dare Buy Stocks? When the Fed Slashes Rates Aggressively, the Market Usually Rises-Um, Eventually
When there is a stock-market boom, and everyone is scrambling for common stocks, take all your common stocks and sell them... No doubt the stocks you sold will go higher. Pay no attention to this--just wait for the depression, which will come sooner...
FASHION: L.A. Style Is Ready for Prime Time: A Generation of California Designers Has Put Paris, Milan and New York on Notice
It's a classic Hollywood story line: a lonely outsider follows his improbable dream, only to find fans, fortune and fame. Four years ago, when Cameron Silver opened the Los Angeles vintage-clothing shop Decades, his block of Melrose Avenue was hardly...
He's the Boss: James Gandolfini Is an Enigmatic, Unassuming Superstar. Here's How He Made It out of the Jersey Suburbs-And Back
About a year ago, at the Golden Globes, Julia Roberts happened to catch James Gandolfini's eye across the room, and, though she had never worked with him, never met him, never even spoken to him on the phone, she waved. And he did not wave back. Roberts...
In the Thick of It: A Reporter's Firsthand Account of Being Shelled in the Tetovo Hills as Violence between Macedonian Slavs and Albanians Escalates
The attack came with little warning. We had just arrived in Selce, an idyllic cluster of red-tile-roofed houses packed tightly on the steep eastern slopes of a river gorge. For several weeks this strategically located hamlet high above the Macedonian...
Newsmakers
Kidman's Cannes-Can We figured Nicole Kidman would survive her breakup with Tom Cruise, but who knew she'd come out singing and dancing? Turns out that her next movie's a "musical opera." "Moulin Rouge," which will kick off the Cannes Film Festival...
No Future-And No Past: Taking an Inside Look at the Zealotry of the Taliban
Squatting on a cushion, his artificial limb resting by his side, Mullah Nooruddin Turabi listens to the pleas of people thronging his stuffy office. The Afghans have plenty to complain about: war, drought, starvation, even a strange plague of insects....
Ofir's Fatal Attraction: An Israeli Boy Looks for Love Online and Meets a Vengeful Palestinian
Their online conversations resonated with the thrills and innocence of a budding romance. She told him he appeared in her dreams. He told her he missed her constantly. Many of their exchanges ended with "I love you." But while Ofir Rahum, the Israeli...
Periscope
BLAIR Threatened by the Epidemic They call him Teflon Tony. British Prime Minister Tony Blair was headed smoothly into the next election: by one count, as much as 26 points ahead of the Tories. His approval ratings seemed immune to many of the country's...
Perspectives
"I'll outlive all of 'em."South Carolina Sen. Strom Thurmond, 98, responding to predictions that he won't live out his term "We live in a dangerous world now." James Zumwalt, father of Fran Zumwalt, a teacher wounded during the shooting at Granite...
Playing a God in Eden: Peter Molyneux's New Computer Game Tests Your Ability to Manage a Fantastical World
Wouldn't it be hilarious if a god one day showed up as a gigantic animal that walked around, wreaked havoc on our lives and performed a pretty mean roundhouse kick? OK, maybe demented is a better word. This strange vision is just the sort of thing...
Rosie Rolls out "Rosie": A Popular Talk-Show Host Launches a Women's Glossy. Old-School Editors Roll Their Eyes, While Advertisers Go for It. Sound Familiar?
In front of 4 million adoring fans, daytime talk-show host Rosie O'Donnell has gushed over Tom Cruise, wept with joy while introducing Barbra Streisand and hugged her "best friend," Madonna. So it may come as some surprise to O'Donnell fans that she...
The $14 Billion Question: The Fighting Has Started over Who Gets the Bill for California's Bungled Attempt to Deregulate Electricity. Alas, the Energy Fairy Is Not in Sight
Most of the news out of California these days involves rolling blackouts, summer-meltdown scenarios, finger-pointing and posturing. But when you come right down to it, the story isn't about energy, it's about money. To be specific, $14 billion that...
The Coming Storm: If You Think Most TV Fare Is Lame Now, Just Wait for a Strike by the Writers' and Actors' Guilds. It'll Put the Boob Back in the Tube
As hundreds of advertisers streamed into ABC's season preview last week, the background music included the theme from "Goldfinger." The promised lineup included new series from "Seinfeld's" Jason Alexander and producer Steven Bochco. But in fact, the...
The Darker Side of Practicing Generosity: Nobility Eludes Me If No One's Watching. and 'Just Do It' Leaves Me Cold. What's a Do-Gooder to Do?
What I do on Friday nights is deliver meals to terminally ill people. You think that's admirable? Read further. A Tibetan lama coined a great phrase for people like me: "generous idiot"--a do-gooder who creates havoc. Two years ago, to feel good...
The New Animal Farm: Can Pigs Produce Organs for Humans? A New TV Documentary Examines the Prospects, and the Hazards
If you had to pick the likely stroke victim from a lineup, Amanda Davis is not the person you'd choose. On the eve of her 20th birthday, the sweet-faced New Englander was driving home from college to visit her parents when she started feeling queasy...
The New Old Man: The Discovery of a 3.5 Million-Year-Old Skull Suggests That the Famous 'Lucy' May Not Be Our Direct Ancestor
As a little girl, Meave Leakey loved doing jigsaw puzzles, except for one thing: she found them too easy. To give herself more of a challenge, she flipped all of the pieces face down, and only then, with just their shapes to guide her, put the puzzle...
The Surging Price of Power: While California Learns to Live with Blackouts, the Rest of the Nation Faces a Different Energy Crisis: Soaring Utility Bills
Forget "Gladiator." in Hollywood last week, the smart money was riding on The Long Hot Summer. As the threat of blackouts once again became reality, stylists who'd gathered at the swanky L'Ermitage Hotel in Beverly Hills to primp celebrities for Sunday's...
'Torch' Feels the Heat: Under Investigation, Torricelli Pushes Finance Reform
To visitors in the Senate gallery last Wednesday morning who didn't know any better, Bob Torricelli probably sounded like the voice of reform. "There is an endless spiral of fund-raising that is out of control," said the pugnacious New Jersey Democrat,...
TRAVEL: One Real Space Cowboy: The Galactic Confrontation over Dennis Tito, Who Wants to Go Where No Businessman Has Gone Before
The average wealthy person would not put up with what I'm putting up with," says Dennis Tito, who is far from your average wealthy person. Worth more than $200 million, the founder of the investment giant Wilshire Associates (it controls $1 trillion...
What a Drama: "Law & Order's" Dick Wolf Imagines the Fate of a Fictional Show, "Hook and Ladder," as It Navigates the Labyrinth of Network Politics
It's TV-premiere week in September. You're sitting at home trying to decide whether to invest an hour in a new network drama. You've seen most of the actors before. You liked one of them when he did "NYPD Blue." One of the female stars had a recurring...
Where PC Meets Free Speech: A War over Ads about Slavery Reparations Is Not as Black and White as It Might Seem
When I was in high school, my history teacher assigned us a well-written but crudely argued book by a left-wing historian named David Horowitz. The book depicted the United States as a disgustingly racist and imperialist power, and our homework was...
Why the Sopranos Sing: Nothing Else on TV Can Touch HBO's Mob Hit-And That's Got the Network Suits Watching Their Backs. Will 'The Sopranos' Change the Face of Television?
It's hard to pinpoint when a mere TV show becomes a cultural phenomenon, but there are a few mile markers on "The Sopranos" turnpike to the big time. Certainly the day when the Feds recorded two New York mobsters bragging (erroneously) about turning...
You Should Be in Pixels: Hollywood Is Adopting the Digital Technology Your High-End Camcorders Use. the Studios Hope to Save Money in the Long Run-But at What Cost to Moviegoers?
Who needs film? Evidently George Lucas doesn't. He shot his next "Star Wars" movie digitally, on tape instead. In 1996, when the science-fiction director saw movie production costs soaring past the $100 million mark, Lucas approached Sony with a challenge:...