Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from October 15

'A Long, Hard Campaign': For the First Time, the Secretary of State Lays out the Plans for the Battle against Terror-And Explains How It Could Shape a New Global Order
The mass murders that were committed on Sept. 11 under the direction of Osama bin Laden and his Qaeda network have united the world against international terrorism. Some 80 countries lost citizens in the attacks. From our shared grief and shared resolve...
A Merger of Mosque and State: Is Suicide Bombing Allowed? the Meaning of the Quran Can Depend More on Politics Than on Scholarship
Sheik Muhammad Rafaat Othman is a lonely man. Though he teaches Islamic law at the most prestigious Islamic school in the Middle East, Cairo's Al-Azhar University, he has no congregation to preach to. The soft-spoken professor, who wears thick, dark...
An Answer as Hard as the Question
Islam vs. the West. History is filled with military battles between Christians and Muslims (and Jews), from the Crusades to the colonial era to the 20th century's intifadas and Balkan nightmares. In the last three weeks, Americans have dug deep into...
A Rehearsal for Killing Osama: The Language of Lawyers Cannot Control the 'Forward Leaners' the Nation Needs Right Now
"The rules have changed," said President Bush as he put the U.S. military on a path to participation, with some unpleasant people employing savage tactics, in an extraordinary manhunt. The target was the world's most notorious criminal--someone who...
Blame America at Your Peril: Critics of the War on Terrorism Don't Seem to Understand: Someone Is Trying to Kill Them
After we attack the Taliban and the terrorists strike us again, you know what's going to happen. A big old-fashioned peace movement will emerge that blames the United States for whatever further destruction is inflicted. We'll be told that we "prompted"...
Bush's 'Phase One': First Up: The Terror Bases. Getting Ready to Strike, the President's Also Got to Keep Peace on the Home Front
The Truman balcony in the white house is a lovely spot, with a panoramic view of the Mall and monuments--perfect, George W. Bush hoped, for an inspirational chat with the Republican House leadership. But when they arrived at cocktail hour for back-porch...
Chapter II: Failed Ideas: How Does a Region That Once Yearned for Modernity Could Reject It So Dramatically?
About a decade ago, in a casual conversation with an elderly Arab intellectual, I expressed my frustration that governments in the Middle East had been unable to liberalize their economies and societies in the way that the East Asians had done. "Look...
Chapter III: Enter Religion: The Origins of "Islamic Fundamentalism"
Nasser was a reasonably devout Muslim, but he had no interest in mixing religion with politics. It struck him as moving backward. This became apparent to the small Islamic parties that supported Nasser's rise to power. The most important one, the Muslim...
Chapter I: The Rulers: The Middle East Desperately Wanted to Become Modern, but Failed
It is difficult to conjure up the excitement in the Arab world in the late 1950s as Gamal Abdel Nasser consolidated power in Egypt. For decades Arabs had been ruled by colonial governors and decadent kings. Now they were achieving their dreams of independence,...
Cracking the Terror Code: From Go-Go Clubs to Vegas, the Plotters Brought Modern Twists to an Ancient Mission. Now the Feds Are Following the Money, Wondering about Iraq-And Worrying about What's Next
On the night before they went out on a suicide mission to kill someone, the Assassins, the 12th-century cult of holy-warrior hit men, were given a taste of the Paradise that awaited. They smoked hashish (the word assassin derives from hashashin, users...
Eyeball to Eyeball, at A Distance: Business Travel: How Videoconferencing May Provide the Alternative in a Time of Anxiety and Fear
Craig Brandofino, who runs videoconferences for the New York accounting firm Ernst & Young, was looking for ways to leverage the firm's top-of-the-line system. Only half its capacity was in use at any one time. The Sept. 11 attacks changed all...
From Rants to Rights: Once a Revolutionary, Shala Sherkat Is a Fervent Feminist
More than two decades ago Shala Sherkat was part of the crowd in Tehran chanting against America the Great Satan and trying to bring down the shah. Today she preaches a gentler kind of revolution: Iranian feminism. Sherkat, managing editor of Zanan...
Going Long on the Big Three: In Today's Unsettled Times, Cash, Life Insurance and Bonds Provide a Needed Sense of Security
Everyone is waiting for things to get back to normal. But listen up: there is no "normal." We see one set of conditions and learn to run our lives accordingly. Then conditions change, and change again--always to a different game. The new rules aren't...
Mail Call: Again Last Week, Nearly 2,000 Readers Wrote to Us about Terrorism and Tragedy, Pride and Patriotism
'And America Will Survive' It's late. I'm tired. I didn't sleep much last night. Thank you. Thank you for publishing in your last three issues the pictures of the terrorist attacks and their aftermath that kept me from sleeping. I needed to see...
Meet the Bin Ladens: They Had It All: Money, Power-And Now the Most Wanted Man on Earth. A Family Affair
Boston real-estate agent Ellen Signaigo Brockman was paging through the newspaper one day in the early 1990s when a story about a little-known terrorist named Osama bin Laden caught her eye. A few days later, she showed the article to a business acquaintance....
Muslim Warriors-For America: Arab-Americans Must Bridge a Gulf of Misunderstanding in the U.S. Military. Most Just Want to Blend In
Suheira hadn't cried in public until that moment. The New York-based writer had steeled herself when she got the news that acquaintances had been killed in the World Trade Center attacks. She had remained strong for her immigrant parents, who, after...
Newsmakers
Wedding Planner J. Lo got married. Next album: "J. Ju." Jennifer Lopez and Cris Judd, her backup-dancer beau, walked down the aisle Sept. 29 at a private home in Calabasas, Calif. The bride wore an off-white, shocking (well, shockingly demure) Valentino...
Part IV: What to Do
If almost any Arab were to have read this essay so far, he would have objected vigorously by now. "It is all very well to talk about the failures of the Arab world," he would say, "but what about the failures of the West? You speak of long-term decline,...
Periscope: NEWSWEEK's Look Behind and beyond the News
THE FBI 'They're Not Sharing Anything' The Feds couldn't have sounded more effusive at a Justice Department photo op last week with state and local police chiefs to tout cooperation in the war on terrorism. With more than two dozen local chiefs...
Perspectives
"You can just about bet on it." Sen. Richard Shelby, ranking Republican on the Senate intelligence committee, on the probability of another attempted attack on America "I'm in a firing mood." Massachusetts acting Gov. Jane Swift, unaware that her...
Pork Barrel or A Kick-Start? to Bolster the Faltering Economy, Our Leaders Are Throwing Open the Federal Coffers. A Little Caution Is in Order
Until Sept. 11, Washington seemed to have only one gear: neutral. Squabbling over the Social Security "lockbox" was the order of the day. The lockbox may have been a little silly, but it did keep spending and tax cutting under some sort of control....
Shooting to the End: Bill Biggart Was a Photographer Who Died Taking Pictures of the Trade Center. When His Body Was Recovered, So Were His Last Frames. Here Is What He Saw
Bill Biggart walked two miles from his apartment near Union Square to reach Ground Zero on the morning of the attack, taking pictures along the way, and he went about 100 feet too far. Other photographers were almost as close to the Twin Towers that...
Storming the Fortress of Hidden Terrorist Funds: Banking: Investigators and Lawmakers Are Hot on the Money-Laundering Trail of Al Qaeda and Other Networks
Even before President George W. Bush unveiled his "most wanted" list of suspected terrorist financiers, bankers around the world were rushing to make sure they weren't holding the wrong moneybags. Accounts had already been frozen in Britain and Switzerland...
The Battle on the Ground: The Taliban's True Believers Prepare to Fight, Even as Enemies Whittle Away at Their Support
Abdul plays the Great Game pretty well. He's slightly built with a boyish demeanor and an unflinchingly calm gaze--good assets for a spy. His thin whiskers are a liability, however, when he's collecting intelligence on Taliban militiamen in Kabul....
The Kids Who Saw It All: Students at Stuyvesant High School Return to Their Building This Week. but They Know Their Lives Will Never Be the Same
What Michael Mascetti wants to remember now is another September day three years ago, during his first week as a freshman at Stuyvesant High School. He was a skinny kid back then, who just wanted to hang out on the corner with his buddies in Queens....
The Making of a Mujahed: Schooled in the Peaceful Precepts of Islam, a Young Afghan Drops His Books and Prepares for War
Ahmad Dallah, 18, a soft-spoken student of religion, admits he has never picked up a rifle and has spent only two weeks of his life in Afghanistan, visiting the ruins of his family home in Kabul. But when school ends in two weeks, he will pack away...
The Politics of Rage: Why Do They Hate Us? to Dismiss the Terrorists as Insane Is to Delude Ourselves. Bin Laden and His Fellow Fanatics Are Products of Failed Societies That Breed Their Anger. America Needs a Plan That Will Not Only Defeat Terror but Reform the Arab World
To the question "Why do the terrorists hate us?" Americans could be pardoned for answering, "Why should we care?" The immediate reaction to the murder of 5,000 innocents is anger, not analysis. Yet anger will not be enough to get us through what is...
Yes, I Follow Islam, but I'm Not a Terrorist: The Tragedy of Sept. 11 Gives Americans the Chance to Learn about a Religion They Have Never Understood
As an Egyptian-American and a Muslim, I've always been dismayed by the way Islam has been generally misrepresented in the media and misunderstood by most Americans. Since the tragic events of Sept. 11, Islam has been in the spotlight, and though leaders...