Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 31

[0] the Day That Changed America
September 11 dawned bright and clear, but was soon darkened by terror. The story of a survivor, a killer and the vice president whose lives collided in hours of horror and heroism Except for the place where they died, Bill Feehan and Mohamed Atta...
Alicia Keys: R&B Vocalist
Byline: Allison Samuels Alicia Keys is having a funky hair day. R&B's new queen is in a New York brownstone doing a cover photo shoot for Essence magazine, but her signature braids are a bit too frizzy, and her personal braider will have to...
America's Gravest Threat: Thinking This War's Won
Byline: Jonathan Alter It's hard to imagine now that the events of September 11 will ever seem distant. The wreckage at Ground Zero, the smoking-gun video--in a hundred ways, the wounds feel fresh. But by this time next year, barring new terrorist...
Anthony Romero: Executive Director, ACLU
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores One week after starting his new job as executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union, Anthony Romero was in a Hilton conference room in Washington, poised to deliver his debut speech to the group's 80 biggest...
Arafat Is a Traitor: The Palestinian Leader Finally Persuades Hamas and Islamic Jihad to Call off Their Suicide Bombers and Stop Shelling Jewish Settlements. but Lasting Peace Seems No Closer. Israel Remains Suspicious, and Palestinian Hard-Liners Battle Their Own Police in the Streets of Gaza, Angrier Than Ever
Byline: Joshua Hammer For two days, emissaries from Yasir Arafat shuttled in and out of a modest compound on a back alley in Gaza City. Arafat, who was penned up by Israeli tanks in his own headquarters on the West Bank, needed help from Sheik Ahmed...
Arts and Entertainment: Back to Business as Usual
Byline: David Gates A couple of weeks ago the poet Edward Hirsch was talking on public radio--pretty much the only media outlet where you'll hear a poet talk these days--about how since 9-11 people have had a new appetite for serious fiber in their...
Astronomy: Look, Ma, No Telescope: The Cosmos in a Box
Byline: Sharon Begley Gerhard Hahn didn't have time for telescopes this summer. He wanted to calculate the orbit and then the size of an icy little space rock just beyond Pluto in the Kuiper Belt, the solar system's maternity ward for comets. But...
A Tragic Calculus: The Plan for Compensating Terror's Victims Is about as Fair as It Could Possibly Be
Byline: Steven Brill A 30-year-old stockbroker survived by a wife and two children: $4.3 million. A 55-year-old janitor survived by a wife and two children: $540,000. A 26-year-old unmarried, childless apprentice electrician: $670,000. A widowed...
Bill Frist: U.S. Senator
Byline: Howard Fineman Bill Frist knew what to do the moment he got the call on a Saturday morning this past fall. He had stopped by the makeshift "situation room" in the Capitol, where officials were monitoring the anthrax attack on Congress. It...
Bush's Next Challenge: Dodging No. 41's Fate
Byline: Howard Fineman George W. Bush hadn't even begun the 2000 campaign, but, in his methodical way, he was already looking ahead to his presidency. At lunch in Austin in 1999, he mused aloud about lessons to be drawn from his dad's one-term tenure....
Cable's A-Team: Comcast's AT&T Victory Will Give Broadband a Much-Needed Boost
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts In the never-ending attempts to convince consumers that nirvana is just one purchase away, snake-oil salesmen may have a better track record than peddlers of broadband. Despite endless hype about movies on demand, instant...
Claire Fraser: President, Institute for Genomic Research
Byline: Adam Rogers Three black standard poodles politely greet visitors to the office of Claire Fraser, president of The Institute for Genomic Research. TIGR, as it's called, developed an innovative way to sequence genes, and even the dogs aren't...
Conventional Wisdom Watch
Conventional Wisdom Watch A Year We'll Never Forget Edition Little did we know when we were glued to Connie Chung's Condit interview and obsessively counting shark attacks that we were in the final days of the age of denial. After tragic September...
Education: Urban Schools Play an Anxious Numbers Game
Byline: Pat Wingert During the boom years of the 1990s, teachers and administrators at inner-city schools had reason to hope that better days were ahead. Prosperity meant that states and cities had more money to spend on the classroom. Education...
Hideo Kojima: Videogame Designer
Byline: N'Gai Croal and Kay Itoi If Hideo Kojima were a novelist, he would be Jonathan Franzen. If he were a television producer, he'd be David Chase. And if he were a filmmaker, he would be Peter Jackson. Kojima once dreamed of doing all those...
How He'll Haunt Us: Bin Laden Is Just the First Act. Winning America's War on Terror Will Mean Overcoming Ancient Hostilities-At Home and Abroad
Byline: Evan Thomas and Mark Hosenball In the mountain passes and smugglers' trails of Tora Bora, small teams of U.S. Special Forces snipers were methodically picking off fleeing Qaeda fighters. A force of Marines may soon begin clearing the rubble...
James Parker: CEO, Southwest Airlines
Byline: Adam Bryant Jim Parker first met Herb Kelleher in 1977 in a courtroom, representing different parties in a fraud case. They stayed in touch and discovered they had more than the legal profession in common--they both drank Wild Turkey bourbon....
Lt. Gen. Charles Wald,: U.S. Air Force
Byline: John Barry Victory, as the ancient Greeks said, has a thousand fathers, and the scramble is already on to claim paternity for Operation Crescent Wind, the innovative air campaign that broke the Taliban's rule over Afghanistan in two months...
Medicine: Searching for a New and Improved Prozac
Byline: Geoffrey Cowley Prozac has brought the pharmaceutical industry immeasurable joy since its debut in the late 1980s. The drug and its cousins--Zoloft, Paxil and the rest--now generate $8 billion in sales each year. And judging by the million...
Mohamed Khatami: President of Iran
Byline: Christopher Dickey It was Mohamed Khatami's smile that won the votes of Iranians, and his tears that won their hearts. He's a complicated man, this son of an ayatollah, this mullah and revolutionary intellectual who is president of Iran....
Next Up: Saddam: After September 11, Washington Sees Iraq's Weapons Capabilities as a Direct and Intolerable Threat to American National Security. So What Will Be Done?
Byline: Christopher Dickey and John Barry Saddam Hussein lives for vengeance. But in 2002 the Iraqi dictator, who haunted the '90s, could well get a taste of someone else's wrath. And for President George W. Bush, it will be personal. In 1993, after...
Periscope: Reporters' Notebooks: Our Eyewitnesses to History
Byline: Suzanne Smalley; John Ness; Jonathan Alter; Julie Scelfo; Eve Conant; Christian Caryl; Gregory Beals; Colin Soloway From the first moments of the September 11 horror through the weeks since, our reporters have been on scene in America and...
Prepare to Deal with a Murky Market
Byline: Allan Sloan This is the season for pundits to gaze into their crystal balls (or their navels) and tell us the outlook for stocks, bonds and the economy next year. It's a lot of fun, but not particularly useful. Despite all the high-priced...
Religion: How Should We Think about Islam?
Byline: Kenneth L. Woodward The terrorist attacks of September 11 brought out the best and the worst in American religion. Clergy of all collars worked at Ground Zero in New York City, ministering to exhausted firefighters and emergency workers,...
Ruth Simmons: President, Brown University
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz Throughout her nearly three decades in higher education, Ruth Simmons has always found people eager to advise her on how to succeed in academia. Work your way up through the faculty ranks, they said. Don't get pigeonholed...
Sarah Hughes: Figure Skater
Byline: Mark Starr After Michelle Kwan opted to continue competing following her upset loss to 15-year-old Tara Lipinski at the 1998 Nagano Olympics, the sporting press was quick to pronounce her a lock for the next figure-skating gold medal four...
Technology: Grappling with the New Politics of Software
Byline: Steven Levy Is your software friend or foe? It's getting harder and harder to tell. You paid for it and figure it's working for you, helping you produce documents, keeping you connected and entertaining you. But software is frequently a...
The Day That Changed America
Byline: Evan Thomas Virginia DiChiara did have a premonition that something wicked was on the way. DiChiara, whose office was on the 101st floor of the North Tower, had worried that the terrorists might come back to finish off the World Trade Center....
The New Coin of the Realm: The Euro Seems a Triumph-One Currency for One Market. but It May Be a Case of Overreaching
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson The other day I visited my local bank and bought $30 each of French francs, German marks and Italian lire. I have no immediate need for them or the Spanish pesetas, Greek drachmas or Dutch guilders that I might also have...
The New Rules of Engagement
Byline: Fareed Zakaria In one sense, America leaves 2001 more powerful than at the start of the year. Within three months, from a standing start, it toppled a government 7,000 miles away in the most inhospitable terrain on earth--the mountains and...
The Toughest Job in the World: Hamid Karzai's Great Strength Is That He's a Nice Guy. but in Afghanistan, That Could Also Be His Undoing
Byline: Babak Dehghanpisheh and Ron Moreau The Wall Street of Kabul is a place called Shahzadeh Market. And the closest thing that Shahzadeh Market has to a Master of the Universe is Said Fahim Khaksar. Dressed in a black leather jacket and a white...
Transition: What Lives They Lived: They Dazzled Us and Taught Us and Shaped Us. in Memoriam 2001
Ray Walston b. Nov. 2, 1914 If there is life on Mars, let's hope it's like Ray Walston. With his lean little frame and balding pate, he played TV's extraterrestrial extraordinaire for three glorious seasons. Still, Walston did so much more than...
Walker's Brush with Bin Laden: The American Taliban Says He Fought Alongside Al Qaeda. Will That Get Him the Death Penalty?
Byline: Daniel Klaidman and Michael Isikoff As an American among the Taliban, John Walker Lindh was an oddity, to say the least. But the young convert to radical Islam repeatedly proved his loyalty to the cause, undergoing spiritual education in...
Weren't We All So Young Then? Too Much Blue Sky, and beneath It, Just Nothing. Who Knew Open Space Could Be So Terribly Sad?
Byline: Anna Quindlen Nightfall is as dramatic as the city itself in the days surrounding the winter solstice. The gray comes down fast, pearl to iron to charcoal in a matter of minutes, muting the hard edges of the buildings until in the end they...
Why Diller Is on Top of the World: A Showbiz Mogul's Sweetest Deal Yet. Can You Say Tax-Free?
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts and Allan Sloan In the annals of american labor, show-business mogul Barry Diller has set a record for pay that's unlikely ever to be broken. By merely showing up for the first day's work as chief executive of the newly...