Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 27

A Dash of Style: Forget Horsepower. Carmakers Are Trying to Lure Buyers with Burled Walnut, Brushed Aluminum and 'Cockpit' Lighting Borrowed from Private Jets
Byline: Keith Naughton When office-furniture designer John Kaloustian first saw the interior of the Audi TT, he was sold. He couldn't resist the thick rawhide stitching on the tan leather seats. "Those baseball-glove seats were a must-have," he...
A Magazine of Their Own: A New Quarterly Catering to Muslim Women Debuts
Byline: Lorraine Ali It was easy to spot Tayyibah Taylor at a recent journalism conference in Chicago. A gorgeous woman in a silky headwrap, she was clutching a copy of Azizah magazine to her chest like a guard concealing jewels from marauding thieves....
Andersen: Shredding the Case? the Latest on the Accounting Firm's Days in Court
Byline: Anne Belli Gesalman For a trial about the destruction of documents, there seems to be no shortage of records. Already hundreds of pages of memos and e-mails related to Arthur Andersen's accounting work for Enron Corp. have been admitted...
Angels with Dirty Faces: The Closed World of Firefighting Has Become a Hot Topic-And the Subject of a Fresh Wave of New Reportage and Fiction
Byline: Malcolm Jones In "Firehouse" (Hyperion), David Halberstam looks at the men of Engine Co. 40 and Ladder Co. 35, who work out of a firehouse at West 66th Street and Amsterdam Avenue in Manhattan. On September 11, 2001, two rigs with 13 men...
A Train Wreck Called Title IX: Some Feminists Actually Seem to Think 'Young Girls Aren't Worthy of Respect and Admiration Unless and until They Act like Young Boys'
Byline: George F. Will On this 30th anniversary of the enactment of Title IX, the law prohibiting sexual discrimination in education, consider this: has even more nonsense been written about Title IX than has been committed in its name? Title...
Bottom of the Ninth: The End of the Game Is Coming for Fidel Castro. the Big Question Is How Things Will Play out after He's Gone
Byline: Joseph Contreras Cubans could only wonder what Fidel Castro was thinking. For the first time last week he allowed a visiting Western dignitary to address the nation on live TV, without interruption or editing--and Jimmy Carter made the most...
Canceled: Any Half-Full Flight: A Little Bit of Elbow Room Is as Hard to Find These Days as an In-Flight Meal
Byline: Kevin Peraino What does paradise look like? Ask some weary travelers in the limbo of an airport terminal and it'll likely include that luxury of flying days gone by--a half-empty airplane and some precious elbow room. It would seem a reasonable...
Do Your Homework! Did Confucius Say That? Lots of Chinese Think So
Byline: Paul Mooney The toddlers clad in satiny Chinese tunics don't seem to be taking the day's lesson to heart. As a 5-year-old girl recites from the Confucian classic, Discipline of Students, boys in the back row smack each other with their textbooks....
Enter, Stage Right. Bibi Has a Plan (Hint: It Doesn't Include a PLO State)
Byline: Lally Weymouth Former Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin (Bibi) Netanyahu has never been comfortable out of the limelight. But rarely has he appeared so baldly ambitious as he seemed last week, when he orchestrated a Likud Party resolution...
Great Minds, Great Ideas: Will Scientist Stephen Wolfram and Inventor Dean Kamen Be Known as the 21st Century's Most Important Thinkers? If All Goes According to Their Plans
Byline: Steven Levy If the respective experiences of Stephen Wolfram and Dean Kamen are any indication, hell on earth for a brilliant innovator is spelled s-c-h-o-o-l. British-born Wolfram, now 42, son of a novelist and a philosophy professor,...
'I Sniff Some Politics': Bitter about the Capital Storm, Bush Needs to Get over His Anger and Give Up His Love of Secrecy and Surprise
Byline: Howard Fineman It was supposed to be a routine drop-by, little more: A quick strategic review with the president before he awarded a medal to Nancy Reagan in the Capitol Rotunda. But by the time George W. Bush arrived at a private gathering...
Jerry Levin Swans on a Blue Note: AOL Time Warner's CEO Says Goodbye
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts Jerry Levin strolled onto the stage of Harlem's famed Apollo Theatre--the site of AOL Time Warner's annual meeting last week--for his final bow as CEO. Many music legends, like B. B. King and Muddy Waters, have played...
Middle East: The Sky's the Limit: Israel's Economy Is a Shambles. but the Perks to People Willing to Settle in the Occupied Territories Keep Coming. Is This Any Way to Make Peace?
Byline: Dan Ephron Lisa Nhmani would have preferred to stay in Jerusalem but she couldn't afford to buy a house for her family of five. The four-bedroom homes she was seeing ran about $250,000, much more than the Nahmanis could manage. She began...
Newsmakers: This Week: Jimmy Kimmel, SpongeBob and Woody Allen
Byline: John Horn Sayonara, SpongeBob Anybody with a kid old enough to work the remote knows Nickelodeon's "SpongeBob SquarePants" is as indispensable as a sippy cup. Launched less than three years ago, the undersea adventures of a simple-minded...
Now Who Do You Trust? Most Investors Still Trust Business, Even While They Mutter about a Few Rotten Apples in the Barrel. but the Rot Is More Structural Than You Thought
Byline: Jane Bryant-Quinn Among the 1990s fads was a rah-rah team-building game played at management retreats. You had to fall backward from a modest height and rely on your buddies to catch you before you crashed. Supposedly, the game taught trust...
Perspectives
"They were either asleep, or inept, or both." Sen. Richard Shelby, on the FBI's inactivity after receiving warnings of possible terrorists enrolled in U.S. flight schools "It's a really joyous day, a big day for the people of Sierra Leone, especially...
'Race Still Matters': A Michigan Law School's Admissions Policy May Force a High-Court Showdown on the Thorny Politics of Diversity
Byline: Kevin Peraino Final exams have come and gone this year at the University of Michigan, but the school's hardest-won passing grade didn't arrive until last week. In a hotly debated ruling, a federal appeals court upheld the law school's admissions...
Reopening the Wounds: Families of the Victims of September 11 Greeted Last Week's Revelations with a Mixture of Understanding and Rage
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores, With Karen Breslau and Suzanne Smalley When news of the hijack warnings made headlines last Thursday, La-Shawn Clark was trying to endure an already bleak birthday, her first without her husband. Every May 16, Keefe Clark,...
Start Your Engines, Again: Ricky Rudd Goes for His 656th Ride
He won't get the national-hero treatment Cal Ripken got for all the games he played. But when Ricky Rudd races in this coming Sunday's Coca-Cola 600, he will break the NASCAR record with 656 consecutive Winston Cup starts dating back to 1981. Rudd,...
Technology: Hot Shots for Summer: Tips for Selecting a Digital Camera
Byline: N'Gai Croal If you're thinking about buying a digital camera, what's the most important thing to consider? A couple of years ago it would have been the price or the number of megapixels. But today it's a snap to find a camera for less than...
The Answer? A Domestic CIA. in an Age of Terror, When the Enemy Will Often Be Inside America, We Can't Remain Blindfolded
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Never did we imagine what would take place on September 11," said Ari Fleischer last week, "where people used those airplanes as missiles and as weapons." Actually, as is becoming increasingly clear, many people did imagine...
The Artist's Touch: After Years of Cool Computer Animation, Old-Fashioned Hand-Drawn Films Are Making a Summer Comeback
Byline: John Horn By DreamWorks' own high-tech "Shrek"-y standards, its new film "Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron" looks like an antique. A hand-drawn, two-dimensional eagle soars through the sky, swoops down canyon walls and climbs above a prairie...
The Editor's Desk: NEWSWEEK's Cover Explores What Went Wrong with the Handling of Evidence Related to the Attacks of Sept. 11
Byline: -Mark Whitaker What did George Bush know and when did he know it? From the halls of Congress to the supermarket checkout line, everyone was asking that question last week, after the White House admitted it had received intelligence last...
The Ghosts of Alabama: His Ex-Wife Says Bobby Frank Cherry Bragged about Killing Four Little Black Girls 38 Years Ago. Can His Lawyers Save Him?
Byline: Frederick Burger Bobby Frank Cherry didn't hide his hatred of black people or his membership in the Klan. While he was married to Willadean Brogdon, she testified last week, he would put on his white robe "and dance all around," just to...
The New Great Game: How to Make Nice: Central Asia Is Still a Major Crisis Zone and a Potential Threat to Global Stability. but Former Cold Warriors in Moscow and Washington Are on the Same Side Now
Byline: Christian Caryl and Michael Meyer For 57 years, Russians and Americans have marked the May anniversary of the Allied victory over Nazi Germany in World War II. This year the day took on a special resonance. When the U.S. Defense attache...
The Oldest New Wonder Drug: The Drug Invented 100 Years Ago Could Cure Arthritis and Headaches. New Research Suggests It May Work on Cancers and on Alzheimer's. Should You Be Taking It?
Byline: Jerry Adler and Anne Underwood It was created to ease the pain of arthritis, by a German chemist whose father was being done in by the treatments available at the end of the 19th century. Aspirin relieved Enrico Caruso's headaches, and was...
The Soldiers Serve, the Families Sacrifice: As a Photojournalist and a Veteran's Daughter, I Know How Much Those Left Behind Suffer, Too
Byline: Cheryl Hatch It was March 1967. I was sitting in the back seat of our white Rambler on the Army base in Fort Lewis, Wash., the bumps in the plastic seat covers digging into my knees. The rear window framed my father's receding image--a soldier...
The Uses of Influence from the Ultimate Insider: The First Lady's Thoughts on International Affairs and Education
Byline: Martha Brant Laura Bush was in Budapest last week during her first solo foreign tour when the 9-11 blame wars began back in Washington. She called her husband ("How's Barney?" was one of her first questions, about their adored Scottie),...
Videogames: Coming Distractions
Byline: N'gai Croal The auto-show equivalent to the videogame industry is the annual Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3). Last year the focus was on consoles, as Microsoft's Xbox and Nintendo's Gamecube faced off against Sony's PlayStation 2. Here's...
Watching in Horror: Only Eight Months after the World Trade Center Tragedy, an In-Your-Face HBO Documentary Revisits One of the Deadliest Days in American History. Is It Too Tough to Watch-And Too Soon?
Byline: Marc Peyser What is the half-life of a nation's grief? When will we know that the country has really started to heal from the most horrifying day in recent history? We'll have a good idea on May 26. That's when HBO will broadcast a documentary...
What Went Wrong: The Inside Story of the Missed Signals and Intelligence Failures That Raise a Chilling Question: Did September 11 Have to Happen?
Byline: Michael Hirsh and Michael Isikoff Forget James Bond. Intelligence gathering is more like taking a metal detector to the city dump. So much comes in, rumor, hearsay, disinformation, so little of it more than trash: once in a blue moon an...
Wilde at Heart: Costume Comedy in the Grand Miramax Tradition
Byline: David Ansen The best moments in Oliver Parker's screen adaptation of Oscar Wilde's comedy "The Importance of Being Earnest" are when the movie just sits back and lets Wilde's supremely witty scenes play. Like the one in which the imperious...