Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from October 14

A Killer's Deadly Aim: The Victims May Be Random, but the Shooter Stalking Washington and Its Suburbs Is Terrifyingly Precise
Byline: Pat Wingert and Dirk Johnson It's small, but lightning fast, coming out of the cannon at 3,000 feet per second. It's available at any neighborhood ammo store, but it's the preferred ordnance of Army riflemen and Olympic sharpshooters. And...
Call Him Unhappy Gilmore: Adam Sandler Meets the Director of 'Boogie Nights.' the Result Is One Very Strange Romantic Comedy
Byline: David Ansen Think of "Punch-Drunk Love" as a palate cleanser in Paul Thomas Anderson's extraordinary career. After his two long, high-calorie epics of the San Fernando Valley--"Boogie Nights" and "Magnolia"--this is sorbet. Who would have...
Conroy's Literary Slam-Dunk: A Writer Revisits Life as a Jock, and as a Tortured Son
Byline: Malcolm Jones Showing off the Citadel recently, Pat Conroy kept circling his alma mater, looking up at the looming water tower from different angles. "Somebody put my name up there and then painted one of those circles with a slash over...
Devotional Rescue: How Stay-at-Home Stones Fans Can Get Some Satisfaction
Byline: David Gates This fall the rolling stones have finally mounted exactly the tour you would've ordered up. Such neglected favorites as "She Smiled Sweetly," the 59-year-old Mick leaping like his own grandson, the 58-year-old Keith still standing....
Feeding a Stock Market God
Byline: Allan Sloan If life really does imitate art, there may be hope for the stock market after all. Sure, the market and Corporate America seem completely hopeless these days. After all, stocks finished down for the week yet again, despite the...
Full Metal Joystick: ENTREPRENEURS: The U.S. Army's New Recruiting Videogame Is an Online Phenomenon
Byline: T. Trent Gegax Lincoln Hall rests close to the bottom in the ranks of West Point's most formidable buildings. On the edge of the stone-clad U.S. Military Academy's picturesque plateau, above New York's Hudson River, it houses policy analysts...
Glitterati vs. Geeks: Two Heavyweights, Hollywood and Silicon Valley, Take the Fight over Content to the Supremes
Byline: Steven Levy Larry Lessig admits it: he's nervous. Who wouldn't be? This week the brainy Stanford law professor makes his first appearance before the U.S. Supreme Court--barely a decade after clerking for Justice Antonin Scalia--to argue...
He Used to Be G94B: WHITE HOUSE: How Does the Bush Team Use Tech Gadgetry? It Isn't Just about BlackBerries
Byline: Martha Brant Ari Fleischer kept getting paged. The White House press secretary was sitting in on a meeting last October between his boss and China's President Jiang Zemin during the APEC economic summit in Shanghai. But every few minutes,...
Is Reform a Bad Joke?
Byline: Jane Bryant-Quinn While the accused manipulator, Enron's Andrew Fastow, took his perp walk last week, another and far more important drama was playing out in Washington. This back story raises the question of whether the White House plans...
I Was a Wi-Fi Freeloader: Small Wireless Networks Are Everywhere in the City. Some Net Activists Want You to Know Where the Free Zones Are. Is It Ethical to Access Them?
Byline: Steven Levy The other day, I plopped down on my living-room couch to do some work on my laptop while watching a football game. The family cable modem, which pumps high-speed Internet into our abode, was at the other end of the apartment,...
Merging Man and Machine: Science: A British Professor Foresees a World in Which Language Is Obsolete and Police Respond to the Mere Thought of Crime. Should We Take Him Seriously?
Byline: William Underhill To get an idea of the lengths Kevin Warwick will go to satisfy his scientific curiosity, check out the purple two-inch scar on his left wrist. Last March, surgeons hammered a tiny silicon chip studded with 100 electrodes...
Mideast: 'It Must Be Decisive': Iraq's Neighbors Appear Convinced That War Is Inevitable
Byline: Rod Nordland Rumors of preparations for a coming gulf war fall mostly into one category: "impossible to disprove." According to an Arab intelligence officer in the region, U.S. Special Forces teams are already inside Iraq, hunting Scud missiles...
Miss America: More Than a Beauty Queen? until Organizers Decide What the Title Represents, the Public Will Go on Thinking It Means Very Little
Byline: Kate Shindle For those of us who have walked down that Atlantic City runway with more than 700 rhinestones teetering on our heads, this time of year always evokes a little nostalgia. But for me, watching the new Miss America get crowned...
New Hope in the War against Breast Cancer
Byline: --Karen Springen and Karen Fragala October is the official month for breast-cancer awareness, but too many women are already all too aware of the disease. In the United States alone, it will kill 40,000 women this year and be diagnosed in...
Newsmakers
Byline: Vanessa Juarez,Devin Gordon 'Les Miz' Bows Out They're ripping down the barricades at "Les Miserables," and even Broadway insiders are shocked. After all, "Les Miz" was the sturdiest of Broadway hits, a show that not only managed to make...
Not the Same Ol' Story
Byline: --Bret Begun It doesn't take an M.F.A. to figure out the content of a literary journal named One Story. Subscribers get--that's right!--one story mailed to them every three weeks. It's a paperback work of fiction that's 20-odd pages long,...
Optimism and the Economy
Byline: George F. Will The cupboard where democrats store their adjectives must be nearly bare. "Tragic, deplorable, abysmal" and "atrocious" is Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle's description of the economy. "Stumbling, staggering, faltering,"...
Palace Intrigue: Saddam's Secrets: War or Peace May Hinge on U.N. Access to Iraq's 'Presidential Sites.' Do These Vast Complexes Hold the Key to Iraq's Weapons Program? Behind the Walls-And the Lies
Byline: Christopher Dickey Bassam Qakish doesn't see what all the fuss is about. "The pharaohs built the pyramids, and nobody blamed them because thousands of people died, so what's the big deal about Saddam's palaces?" Qakish, who served as Jordan's...
Perspectives
"Today is a victory for justice." Attorney General John Ashcroft, on arresting four people and charging two others with conspiring to wage war on the United States "You could be next." Excerpt from one of 120,000 leaflets, written in Arabic...
Russia: Is Putin Looking to Expand the Chechnya War?
Byline: Christian Caryl Will Vladimir Putin make a pre-emptive strike of his own? In Moscow, rumors are swirling of an impending Russian military move against Georgia. A source close to the Russian General Staff has told NEWSWEEK that military leaders...
Shadow Struggle: The Beltway: Why America's Intelligence Agencies Just Can't Seem to Get Along
Byline: Evan Thomas Who to believe? On the one hand are the prophets of doom: the senior administration officials who have come forward, one after the other, to describe, in no uncertain terms, the threat posed by Iraqi strongman Saddam Hussein....
Small Screen Drama Kings: Not Long Ago Hollywood Directors Would Rather Have Worn Dockers Than Work in Television. Now That HBO Is Hip and TV Is Hot, the Networks Are the Place to Be
Byline: John Horn Any A-list movie director asked to film at the Oasis Hotel would look around, climb into his SUV and high-tail it to a soundstage to rebuild the motel in all its seedy glory. The downtown Los Angeles hotel's swimming pool is encircled...
So Real It Almost Hurts
Byline: Dave Gerardi Fall is nirvana for sports fans, and not just because of the World Series and the kickoff of the NFL, NBA and NHL seasons. Autumn is also the time when armchair quarterbacks and poolside point guards start playing the latest...
Stopped at the Border: In the Wake of 9-11, One Group Is Having Surprising Difficulty Entering the United States-Performers
Byline: David J. Jefferson For Iranian-Americans, scoring tickets to a performance by Persian pop diva Googoosh is like snagging floor seats to a Madonna concert. After all, this is the singer who was silenced for two decades by Islamic fundamentalists...
Take Me out to the Web Site! E-COMMERCE: Much Hyped, Major League Baseball's Web Site Is Starting to Rally. Can It Be an Economic Model for Other Subscription-Based Businesses?
Byline: Alan Schwarz There was a time, not so many decades ago, when Major League Baseball was so technophobic that one commentator feared broadcasting games on radio would leave the industry "shot to pieces." Later on, it was assumed, TV would...
Terror: Assessing the Threat: In the 1980s the Soviet Union Made Tons of Smallpox. Does Anyone Secretly Have It? Who? and What Are Their Plans?
Byline: Fred Guterl As the country makes contingency plans for a smallpox attack, bioterrorism experts are trying to assess the real risk that terrorists might be able to unleash the deadly virus. Labs in the United States and Russia keep samples...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: --Mark Whitaker After months of heated debate, our leading public-health officials made a startling announcement last week. The bioterror threat brought home by September 11, and the looming showdown with Iraq, have led them to favor eventually...
The Plan to Fight Smallpox: Two Decades Ago We Eradicated the World's Most Devastating Plague. Now the Government Has a Plan to Vaccinate the Entire Population within 10 Days of a Terror Attack, and 10 Million Health and Emergency Workers May Get Their Shots in Advance. but the Inoculation Debate Isn't Over
Byline: Geoffrey Cowley Smallpox is a ghost to most modern doctors--the greatest killer in history, perhaps, but not the sort of problem that shows up in one's waiting room. Dr. Donald Millar and Dr. Michael Lane are old enough to share a different...
The Portland Six: Joining Jihad: They Had Guns, and Plans for Afghanistan. Busting a Would-Be Cell
Byline: Andrew Murr and Kevin Peraino At 6 a.m. Friday, Jeffrey Leon Battle and October Martinique Lewis were asleep in their Portland, Ore., apartment when the team of federal agents, dressed in combat gear, crept up to the front door. For months,...
Those Annoying Ads That Won't Go Away: ONLINE: Hate Those 'Pop-Ups' and Related Marketing Intrusions on Your Computer Screen? Things May Improve
Byline: Brad Stone You can't blame Garth Franklin for trying to make a living. But a year ago, when the 24-year-old from Sydney, Australia, started running ads for online casinos and cable descramblers on his popular movie-gossip Web site, DarkHorizons.com,...
Tony and 'The Torch': Tony Is a Depressed Killer and Toricelli a Brainy Public Servant. Still, the Comparison Does Not Always Favor the Senator
Byline: Jonathan Alter Some lowlife told the feds that the big guy scraped the serial number off the back of his wide-screen TV, took cash while cooking pasta and scored free suits, bronze statues and other booty for his northern New Jersey home....