Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from June 7

A Few Who Got Us Here; When Most People in the Tech Business Were Focusing on Selling Stuff on the Net, Some Were Thinking outside the Box
Byline: Reporting by N'Gai Croal, Elisa Williams, Sudip Mazumdar and B. J. Lee We know Bill Gates as the father of Windows, Steve Jobs as the man behind the iPod and Sergey Brin and Larry Page as the geeks who brought us Google. When it comes to...
A Fight on His Hands; Eliot Spitzer Is on a Sharp Trajectory to Higher Office. the Grasso Case Could Mean Some Nasty Turbulence
Byline: Charles Gasparino Eliot Spitzer's political future seems to grow brighter every day. The New York attorney general has earned a rep as a tough regulator of white-collar fraud with his crackdown on Wall Street stock research and mutual funds....
A Future with Nowhere to Hide? This Connectedness May Lead toward a Future Where Our Cell Phones Track Us like FedEx Packages, Sometimes When We're Not Aware
Byline: Steven Levy We're all too familiar with the concept of technology as a double-edged sword, and wireless is no exception. In fact, the back edge of this rapier is sharp enough to draw blood. Yes, the idea of shedding wires and cables is exhilarating:...
A Return to Sanity, Finally; over the Past Few Weeks We Have Seen a Number of Despondent Editorials by Former Supporters of the War. These Are Good Omens
Byline: Fareed Zakaria, Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com. In his prime-time speech last week, George W. Bush hit all his familiar themes--we must show resolve, stay the course, finish the job, etc. But this masks a very different reality....
Betting on an Old Horse; the CIA Finally Scores a Coup in Iraq-Even If It Wasn't Planned-When the Governing Council Agrees on a New Leader
Byline: Melinda Liu Politics doesn't get much spookier than the way it's played in Iraq. Back when Saddam Hussein ruled, the opposition consisted of numerous sworn rivals, each with his own team of covert operatives and dirty-tricks artists. Nowadays...
California: Arnold Outshines Bush
Byline: Karen Breslau with Tamara Lipper It's not often a politician is so popular that people want to buy his spit. But a cough drop purportedly used and then discarded by California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger--and retrieved from a trash can--was...
Chalabi-And the Questions Keep Coming
Byline: Mark Hosenball It now appears that the Bush administration's decision to distance the United States from Iraqi politician Ahmed Chalabi was considered at the very top. But the controversy over the intelligence activities of Chalabi's Iraqi...
Clean Freaks; Americans Have a Dirty Secret: Our Homes Are a Mess. Now a Booming New Industry Is Helping Us Dig Out
Byline: Peg Tyre, With Julie Scelfo For seven years, Heeman and Jenny Wong had a simple home-organization system. "When a room got really bad, we'd shut the door so no one could see it," says Heeman, 39, a mechanical engineer for Lockheed-Martin...
Drastically Downsized
Byline: Karen Springen At the age of 7, Nikki Morace weighed 160 pounds. By 9, she was up to 250 and had tried every diet from salads to Slim-Fast. Despite her efforts, she tipped the scales at 363 pounds by 14. Her heart was enlarged, her liver...
Dropping the H Bomb; after Months of Breathless Anticipation, That School 'In Boston' Finally Has Its Own Sex Mag. Does Anyone Care?
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz At some point in their encounters with the outside world, Harvard students are forced to admit that they do attend Harvard, not just some school "in Boston" (the preferred understated approach). This is known in Cambridge...
Enemies among Us; Besieged by the Atrocities at Abu Ghraib, Team Bush Turned Attention to the Hunt for Al Qaeda. Politics, Fear and the Story of Another California Drifter
Byline: Evan Thomas, Daniel Klaidman and Michael Isikoff, With Babak Dehghanpisheh and Scott Johnson in Pakistan, Andrew Murr in Los Angeles, Mark Hosenball and Tamara Lipper in Washington and Emily Flynn and Avi Karshmer in London John Ashcroft...
I Was Scared That I Might Hurt My Baby; While Other Mothers Were Reveling in Their New Roles, I Was Spiraling into a Terrifying Darkness
Byline: Katherine Stone, Stone lives in Fayetteville, Ga. Those first few weeks after I brought my son home, I should have known something was wrong. I remembered reading about the "baby blues" in all the pregnancy books, but they made it seem like...
Kerry Drops A Good Idea; Kerry, Too, Said There Was 'Too Much' Money in Politics. That Was before He Discovered That He Could Raise $89 Million in 80 Days
Byline: George F. Will Briefly last week, political hygienists, who strive to perfume the world with campaign-finance reforms, suffered the vapors. Like Victorian maidens scandalized by a glimpse of a loose woman's ankle, they sprawled prostrate...
Let Your Gadgets Go; from Personal Computers to Home Entertainment Centers, the Modern Home Is Trapped in a Tangle of Cables and Wires. Here's a Selection of Devices That Promise to Set You Free
Feeling Kind of Bluetooth 1. CONCORD EYE-Q GO2000 Capture photographs and video clips alike with this camera, then send them to your Bluetooth-equipped printer, PDA or mobile phone. The 2.1- megapixel Eye-Q Go has a 1.6-inch LCD screen to preview...
Mail Call and Corrections: The Revelation of the 'Left Behind' Novels
While many readers responding to our May 24 cover story on the popular "Left Behind" book series disputed the timing, placement or relevance of the Book of Revelation, almost all agreed that the series' doomsday scenario leaves much to be desired....
Making the Ultimate Map; When Digital Geography Teams Up with Wireless Technology and the Web, the World Takes on Some New Dimensions
Byline: Steven Levy There it is, that good old pale blue dot in all its earthly glory, right there on your computer screen. It's a familiar sight, even from a sky-high perspective experienced only by astronauts and angels. But hold on. By mousing...
Martha Holds out A Helping Hand; She's Reached out to a Non-Profit Group with an Offer to Teach Low-Income Women How to Be Entrepreneurs
Byline: Keith Naughton As her sentencing date approaches, Martha Stewart is searching for a way to stay out of jail--or at least get out of jail early. NEWSWEEK has learned that Stewart will seek to serve all or part of her sentence helping underprivileged...
Newsmakers
Byline: Vanessa Juarez, Marc Peyser, David Gates Q&A: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar You'd expect Kareem Abdul-Jabbar to show up in the new DVD "NBA Dynasty Series: L.A. Lakers Complete History," but writing a history book? About World War II? The 7-foot-2...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation Sources From Top To Bottom, Left To Right: The Washington Post (2), New York Times, Associated Press, CNN, New York Times, Smoking Gun, Associated Press (2), Newsday "It's so cliched. It's like, 'There's a slutty girl on the Hill?'"...
Power Play; Goldman's Hank Paulson Won the Battle to Oust Dick Grasso over His Lavish Pay. but Will He Win the War?
Byline: Charles Gasparino It was Dick Grasso's moment, the culmination of frantic, round-the-clock work by the New York Stock Exchange chairman to reopen markets after the attacks of 9/11. Six days later Grasso would show the world that the exchange's...
Something in the Air; Here's What We're Learning with Our Cell Phones, Sensors and Wi-Fi: Losing the Wires Is Only the Beginning. What Happens Next Is Unpredictable, Empowering and Sometimes a Bit Unnerving
Byline: Steven Levy In the '90s, people went bananas over wireless. Electronic communications once thought to be permanently bound to the world of cables and hard-wired connections suddenly were sprung free, and the possibilities seemed endless....
The Abu Ghraib Scandal Cover-Up? Bush Insists That 'A Few American Troops' Dishonored the Country. but Prisoner Abuse Was More Widespread, and Some Insiders Believe That Much Remains Hidden
Byline: Michael Hirsh and John Barry, With Stefan Theil in Berlin, Tamara Lipper and Mark Hosenball in Washington and Melinda Liu in Amman The meeting was small and unpublicized. In a room on the third floor of the Old Executive Office Building...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker It was the summer of 2001, and at our story meetings NEWSWEEK editors were talking about an exciting new phenomenon. Our technology guru Steven Levy had begun visiting the first public "hotspots," where you could get Internet...
The 'Sock Puppet' Strategy; Kerry Whispered, Even as Gore Roared. Inside the Democrats' War Room as They Seek to Exploit Bush's Rough Patch
Byline: Howard Fineman and Susannah Meadows, With Tamara Lipper and Richard Wolffe In Seattle they want their coffee strong and their salmon straight from the river, a yen for flavor that may explain why the air was buzzless in McCaw Hall when Sen....
The Wireless World; Wireless Isn't Just for High-Tech Hubs Anymore. We Chose These Cities and Towns to Show the Variety of Ways People Are Using This New Technology
Byline: Brad Stone, Kay Itoi and Emily Flynn; statistics courtesy of Sperling's BestPlaces Phones, No. Wi-Fi, Yes HERMISTON, ORE. Population: 13,200 Why: Rural areas need the Internet, too Fact: Thirty-five towers and 75 antennas broadcast...
The Wrong Man; Brandon Mayfield Speaks out on a Badly Botched Arrest
Byline: Andrew Murr, With Michael Isikoff, Eric Pape and Mike Elkin He's been home for more than a week now, back with his wife and kids and grateful to be putting his life back together. But Brandon Mayfield, the Portland, Ore., lawyer who was...
Your Next Computer; There Are 1.5 Billion Mobile Phones in the World Today. Already You Can Use Them to Browse the Web, Take Pictures, Send E-Mail and Play Games. Soon They Could Make Your PC Obsolete
Byline: Brad Stone, With Emily Flynn in London, Kay Itoi in Tokyo and B. J. Lee in Seoul One hundred nineteen hours, 41 minutes and 16 seconds. That's the amount of time Adam Rappoport, a high-school senior in Philadelphia, has spent talking into...