Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from June 28

Agent Provocateur; Behind Michael Moore's New Bush-Bashing Bonanza
Byline: David Gates, With David Jefferson Michael Moore's "Fahrenheit 9/11" isn't even out till late this week, and you probably already know what you think about it. Some of the advance reaction has been what you'd expect: Madonna recommending...
Along Came Spidey; Glad to See Tobey Maguire Back in the Tights? So Is He. 'Spider-Man 2' Was a Pain to Get off the Ground. but Here's the Good News: The Movie Really Soars
Byline: Sean Smith Superheroes are not supposed to get fired. Sure, they quit now and then, but saving the world from evil forces would appear to be a pretty secure career choice since bad guys are never in short supply. So the call Tobey Maguire...
Capital Ideas
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn The sweet spot for refinancing a mortgage passed you by a year ago, when 30-year, fixed-rate loans hit a low of 5.37 percent. Back then, "refis were no-brainers," says Keith Gumbinger of HSH Associates, which gathers mortgage...
China Hits the Road; It's the Hottest Car Market in the World, Now That the Middle Class Has More Money to Spend on New Wheels. but Will It Last?
Byline: Keith Naughton, With Craig Simons in Beijing For decades, You Xiaoyi rode a bike to his job at a state-run factory in China. In the 1980s he upgraded to a Beijing public bus. But today You, 70, owns his own factory, and he's ready for the...
Fast Break to the Big Time; More Teenagers Will Be Picked in the NBA Draft This Year Than Ever before. but Is Skipping College a Smart Move? Inside Elite High-School Basketball
Byline: David Noonan and N'Gai Croal The squeak of basketball shoes on hardwood, the chirp of whistles, the thump thump thump of the ball. The familiar sounds echoed through the gym on Chicago's Near North Side as a bunch of high-school kids zipped...
Fed Up with Filling Up; Detroit Used to Think That Consumers Wouldn't Worry about Gas Prices until They Hit $3 a Gallon. but Sales of Hulking SUVs Are Suffering, and Hybrids Are the New 'It' Car
Byline: Keith Naughton, With Patrick Crowley John Luber reached the breaking point when he took the family SUV for a fill-up recently and the pump didn't stop spinning until it hit $65. When the Cincinnati-area dentist got home, he sat down with...
Gotta Be Chinese; to Profit in China, Companies Have to Go Native from Design to Sales, Says a Top CEO Who Has Done It
Byline: B. J. Lee Since Yun Jong Yong became its CEO in 1996, Samsung Electronics has emerged as the most profitable global electronics giant, with 2003 profits of $5 billion on sales of $36 billion. Its success is particularly striking in China,...
Have Experience and Wisdom, Will Travel; We've Found a Way to See the World, Meet New Friends and Make Our Golden Years Meaningful
Byline: Joan Lowell, Lowell lives in Scottsdale, Ariz. There are many different portrayals of aging adults. There are the sad, incompetent, forgetful elderly who must be protected from thieves and swindlers. Then there are those featured in advertisements,...
Horizons Unlimited; He's Rap's New Superstar-You Can Take That to the Bank
Byline: Allison Samuels Lloyd Banks's suave, silky voice is everywhere these days, but until a year ago, when the rapper began touring with his mentor, 50 Cent, and 50's G-Unit posse, he'd never left his native New York. "Being so involved with...
Kerry: Looking to Clinton for a Helping Hand
Byline: Richard Wolffe, Eleanor Clift, Rebecca Sinderbrand and T. Trent Gegax As John Kerry toyed last month with the idea of delaying his official nomination, one voice broke though the babble of advisers and aides: Bill Clinton's. The former president...
Microsoft's Cultural Revolution; How the Software Giant Is Rethinking the Way It Does Business in the World's Largest Market
Byline: Sarah Schafer Microsoft's largest beachhead outside the United States is in the state most hostile to it: China. Since arriving in Beijing in 1990, the Gates empire has assembled a network of business operations, from research and development...
Move Aside, Easy Rider; the Newest Bikers Wear Lipstick with Leather: It's a Girl Thing
Byline: Julie Scelfo Over two rounds of beer and six baskets of chips and salsa, the group of tattooed and leather-vested bikers from New Jersey traded tips on gear and motorcycle dealers. They regaled each other with stories of wild road trips...
Newsmakers
Byline: Allison Samuels, Marc Peyser, Nicki Gostin Who's Checking Out of Hotel California? The L.A. Lakers looked ugly during their NBA finals loss to the Detroit Pistons--and it could get even uglier soon. Coach Phil Jackson has already left,...
Nice Place to Visit; but You Don't Necessarily Want to Invest There. Consider This: China's Economy More Than Doubled over the Last Decade, but an Index of Its Stocks Was Down Two Thirds
Byline: Allan Sloan, Sloan is NEWSWEEK's Wall Street editor. His e-mail is sloan@panix.com. Think of the opportunities to make money investing in an enormous, rapidly developing country that spans a continent. It's a place that welcomes foreign...
Not-So-Hallowed Halls; Groton Battles Abuse Charges That Threaten Its Prestige
Byline: T. Trent Gegax Every time he heard the music, Zeke Hawkins knew they were coming to get him. A 16-year-old first-year student at Groton, the exclusive New England prep school, Hawkins was in a friend's dorm room one night in 1997 when he...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom: The Washington Post, Philadelphia Inquirer, Associated Press, USA Today, Bloomberg, The Washington Post, Reuters, Rochester Democrat And Chronicle, Los Angeles Times, Daily Telegraph "We're at war here......
Picking Sides for the News; If It's Partisanship That Sells, Then We'll Slowly Get More Journalism That Is More Selective and More Slanted, Less Reliable and Less Honest
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson We in the news business think we're impartial seekers of truth, but most Americans think otherwise. They view us as sloppy, biased and self-serving. In 1985, 56 percent of the public felt news organizations usually got...
Space Travel: Great Space Coaster?
Byline: Brad Stone Monday, in the salty desert flats of Mojave, 95 miles north of L.A., a team of aero-space engineers plans to challenge 50 years of thinking about space travel. Their company, Scaled Composites, intends to launch SpaceShipOne with...
Television: Prepare to Twitch
Byline: Marc Peyser Graham Norton is a very naughty man. He thinks nothing of whipping a sex toy out of a drawer and offering it to an unsuspecting guest, just for laughs. He still giggles about the time he found a Webcast of a woman playing "God...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker In "Spider-Man 2," even more than in the first hit movie, Peter Parker is a conflicted hero. He feels a moral obligation to use his superpowers to fight crime. But he agonizes over the lies he tells to lead his double life,...
The Saudi Trap; A Trip through the Kingdom Reveals What Really Needs to Be Done in the War on Terror
Byline: Fareed Zakaria The images of a beheaded Paul Johnson are gruesome, but for Saudi Arabia, it has been more than a year of grim images. It started on May 12, 2003, when three cars packed with bombs exploded in a residential compound in Riyadh,...
The Trouble with E-Ballots; It's a Culture Clash between the Election World, Which Prizes Reliability, and Computer Scientists, Who Obsess over Security
Publisher correction: Wednesday, July 07, 2004 In "The Trouble With E-Ballots" (June 28) we identified Avi Rubin as a researcher at the University of Maryland. He is a professor of computer science at Johns Hopkins University. _____________________...
To Hell with Well Behaved; Women Who Are Interested and Involved in Politics Talk Quietly about How No One Is Chasing Their Vote. Then They Sigh and Move On
Byline: Anna Quindlen Recently a young mother asked for advice. What, she wanted to know, was she to do with a 7-year-old who was obstreperous, outspoken and inconveniently willful? "Keep her," I replied. Not helpful, but heartfelt. I have...
Travel: Great View, Less Sweat
Byline: Brad Tuttle, Tuttle is an associate editor with Arthur Frommer's Budget Travel. Last summer, Rona Maynard and Paul Jones knew they wanted to hike British Columbia's Gulf Islands. They just weren't eager to sleep in cramped tents, lug heavy...
Tricks of the Trade; Shipping Work Halfway around the World Is Risky. A Good Middleman Can Make the Move Pay Off
Byline: Barney Gimbel Dave Mudrick, President of Lasergifts.com, a distributor of personalized redwood pens, silver keychains and the like, knew something was up when his competitors started cutting their prices sharply. After all, he and his rivals...
Under the Hot Lights; Moore's Movie Will Make Waves. but It's a Fine Line between Fact and Fanaticism. Deconstructing 'Fahrenheit 9/11.'
Byline: Michael Isikoff Can Michael Moore be believed? It is a question more than a few moviegoers may be asking this week as his new documentary, "Fahrenheit 9/11," hits theaters. Like Moore's previous works, the movie is a melange of investigative...
Vegas Is Cloning Itself in Macao; with American Moguls Pouring in Billions, the Chinese Copy Could Soon Be Bigger Than the Original Strip
Byline: Alexandra A. Seno Casino tycoon Sheldon Adelson's vision for Macao sounds familiar to anyone who's been to Las Vegas. There will be a $10 billion "strip" of 20 casino-resorts run by global chains, with up to 3,000 rooms each. The anchor...
Who Was Really in Charge? Did Bush Know Cheney Had Given Orders to Down Airliners on September 11? the Commission Staff Wonders-And Remains at Odds with Both Men over Alleged Saddam-Al Qaeda Ties
Byline: Daniel Klaidman and Michael Hirsh, With Mark Hosenball and Michael Isikoff in Washington America was under attack, and some body had to make a decision. Dick Cheney, huddled in the Presidential Emergency Operations Center under the White...
World on A String; Sam Raimi Outdoes Himself with a Surprisingly Rich Sequel
Byline: Jeff Giles "Spider-Man 2" is the most anticipated movie of the summer, so let's dispense with the traditional drumroll: Sam Raimi has made a terrific film. Having said that, let's also admit the obvious. Nothing can really top the contact...