Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from August 23

A Cell Phone? Never for Me
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson Someday soon, I may be the last man in America without a cell phone. To those who see cell phones as progress, I say: they aggravate noise pollution and threaten our solitude. The central idea of cell phones is that you...
A Disease in Disguise; Lyme Can Masquerade as Migraine, or as Madness
Byline: Geoffrey Cowley and Anne Underwood What do you call a headache that lasts five years? Andy Eckl of Trumbull, Conn., came down with a skull-splitter in 1997, when he was 5 years old, and he got no relief until he was 10. He muscled through...
A Heavier Burden; Even as Recovery Spreads Worldwide, Workers Are Finding Themselves Working Harder for Less Money
Byline: Rana Foroohar and Tony Emerson You've heard about the jobless recovery--that strange American paradox of payroll declines in a booming economy. Now, it seems, the Yankee virus has spread to Europe, too. Continental economies are beginning...
A Master of the Art of Living; Julia Child, 1912-2004
Byline: Dorothy Kalins Slipping away quietly in her sleep late last week may have been the only unspectacular thing Julia Child ever did in her 91 years. When, in 1961, in an act of generosity and scholarship, she published "Mastering the Art of...
Fat Cells:the Average Person Has 40 Billion of Them. They Multiply, They're Almost Impossible to Kill and They're Sending Messages to Your Body That Can Ruin Your Health. What You Don't Know about Fat
***** CORRECTION: In "What You Don't Know About Fat" we misspelled the name of a diabetes drug. It is Actos, not Actose. NEWSWEEK regrets the error. ***** Byline: Anne Underwood and Jerry Adler CORRECTION APPENDED It was one of the biggest...
Finally, the Olympics Make It Back to the Land Where They Began; of Gods & Games
Byline: Devin Gordon (With Mark Starr, T. Trent Gegax and Bret Begun) "Don't worry," the Greeks kept saying, again and again, as the weeks and months ticked by, "we'll be ready." It was a gasping, feverish race to the finish, and the edges were...
Georgia on Our Minds; Long after Her Death, O'Keeffe's Still a Definitively American Artist. but Take the Myth with a Grain of Salt
Byline: Peter Plagens For most Americans with an interest in art, the monumentalized flowers and delicately breathtaking landscapes of Georgia O'Keeffe (1887-1986) are modernist enough to be exciting and traditional enough to be credible. Her persona...
He Wanted to Clean Up Politics in the Jersey Capital. It Didn't Work out That Way. a Series of Scandals, and a Gay Secret Life, Cut James McGreevey's Career Short. an Affair to Regret
Byline: Michael Isikoff and Evan Thomas (With Rebecca Sinderbrand, Charles Gasparino, Lisa Helem, Sarah Childress, Andrew Romano and Mehammed Mack) New Jersey Gov. James McGreevey had stayed a step ahead of the rumors for years. In down-and-dirty...
Hot Schools; Trends: Large, Small, Urban, Rural-What's Best for You? Here Are Our Picks for the Places Everyone's Talking about for 2005
Byline: BARBARA KANTROWITZ (With Jordana Lewis, Cathleen McGuigan and Vanessa Juarez) Pull apart the DNA of a student's dream school and you'll find so many different strands. Perhaps it's the location, either in the rolling country- side far from...
How to Survive the New SAT; Standardized Tests: Goodbye Analogies. but Get Ready for Grammar, Harder Math and Writing an Essay
Byline: Richard Rubin Maybe they should just call it the SIT. Because that's what students will do when the new SAT debuts in March: sit through a new grammar section, sit through a new write-your-own-essay section and sit through an already grueling...
Iraq's New Leader Gets Tough-By Unleashing the U.S. Marines. Can That Win Him Respect? Taunts, Traps and Tests
Byline: Rod Nordland and Scott Johnson (With Eve Conant in Washington) Ayad Allawi wants respect, and for as long as anyone can remember in Iraq, that means showing that you're the toughest s.o.b. around. So when radical Shiite militiamen attacked...
Money: A Health-Care Windfall
Byline: Linda Stern Rich Phillips has a wife, three kids and a need for health insurance that won't bust his budget. When the Austin, Texas, consultant left a salaried job last fall to start his own company, Phillips, 34, was getting quotes of about...
Newsmakers
Byline: Devon Thomas, Marc Peyser, Vanessa Juarez Quick, Get Me Rumor Control! New Jersey and San Francisco weren't the only places where it was uncertain last week what was up with marriage, whether solemnized or impending. In Hollywood--you...
Plains Drifting Texas Style; A Four-Day Drive through the Wide-Open Spaces of Big Bend Country Takes You Past Rangeland-And Minimalist Art Installations
Byline: Melissa Marshall Panoramic sunsets and whimsical doll museums. Paranormal phenomena and 1940s-era motels. High art and cowboy kitsch. Across the expanses of Big Bend country, at Texas's extreme southwestern border, attractions run from oddball...
Put 'Em in a Tree Museum
Byline: Anna Quindlen Seeing a bald eagle in one of your trees is like running into a movie star on the street. After years of viewing two-dimensional images, there's a conspicuous shock in encountering the thing in the flesh, looking just like...
Red State, Blue State: It's All in the Family; Dad Watches Fox News, I'm a Michael Moore Fan. We Drive Each Other Crazy, but We Keep Talking
Byline: Cindy Schweich Handler (Handler is a writer living in Montclair, N.J.) No president since Abraham Lincoln has had to put up with so much personal abuse as has George Bush." "The only thing Bush has in common with Lincoln is his party."...
Reinventing Barcelona by the Sea
Byline: Braden Phillips When most people think of Barcelona, they think of modernist architecture rather than seaside vistas. Think again. Even if you miss Forum 2004--a five-month-long extravaganza of multicultural events on the waterfront ending...
She Glitters, but Is She Really Gold? the Defense Takes Aim at Scott Peterson's Flame
Byline: KAREN BRESLAU (With Robina Ricitiello and Bob Jackson) Scott Peterson may have told Amber Frey he wanted her to play a big role in his future, but certainly not like this. Taking the stand last week in Redwood City, Calif., as the prosecution's...
Taking Depression on; Mental Health: Emotional Wellness Has Become a Big Topic on Campus. Suicides and Litigation Have Forced the Issue. What Students and Parents Must Know
Byline: DANIEL MCGINN and RON DEPASQUALE On the long list of worries Mom and Dad have when a child goes to college--grades, homesickness, partying--there's a new issue: the apparent rise in mental illness on campus. More than 1,100 college students...
Terrorism; Leads from A Laptop
Byline: Mark Hosenball, Sarah Sennott, Stryker McGuire and Michael Isikoff As frightening as the recent terror warnings about attacks on the homeland have been, U.S. intelligence officials are still stumped by one key question: did any of the plots...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham "The real causes of obesity," Jerry Adler presciently wrote in NEWSWEEK 22 years ago, "may be locked away deep in the chemical infrastructure of the body." Adler, our science writer, was right, and in this week's cover story...
The Fallout: It's a Catharsis for McGreevey. but What about Those Left Behind? When a Spouse Comes Out
Byline: Karen Breslau and Debra Rosenberg As Cathy Morton watched Gov. James McGreevey's televised confession last week, she felt drawn to his wife, Dina, who stood at his side with a pained half smile frozen on her face. "I've been there," says...
The Layered Lives We Lead
Byline: Jonathan Alter I don't know Jim McGreevey well, and the few times I met him he didn't interest me much. He seemed like just another super-ambitious student-body-president type; the cliched glad-handing style and well-scrubbed-policy-wonk...
Trailblazer: Before Its Time; BMW Has Been Building a Flexible German Workforce since the 1950s
Byline: Karen Lowry Miller Workers at three BMW plants in Bavaria often put in 40-hour weeks, despite a national union contract mandating 35. They work an extra hour or two when asked, as happened three dozen times last year at the Dingolfing plant...
Why Kerry Is Right on Iraq
Byline: Fareed Zakaria (Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com.) John Kerry isn't being entirely honest about his views on Iraq. But neither is President George W. Bush. "Knowing what we know now," Bush asked, "would [Kerry] have supported...