Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 17

Amid Disaster, New Confidence; in Chennai, a Private Street-Cleaning Movement Now Has 17,000 Chapters
Byline: Fareed Zakaria (Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com.) To understand how much and how fast India is changing, look at its response to the tsunami. I don't mean the government's reaction but that of individual Indians. In the two...
A Neglected Nutrient; Are Americans Dying from a Lack of Vitamin D?
Byline: Joan Raymond and Jerry Adler Of all the medical orthodoxies of recent years, few were as ironclad as the prohibition against sunbathing. In a triumph of public education, the notion of a "healthy tan" was turned on its head, as conditions...
Artful Aging; Don't Ever Assume Your Best Work Is Behind You. Creativity Often Peaks in Our Later Years
Byline: Karen Springen and Sam Seibert On his desk at the University of Kentucky, Prof. David Snowdon displays an artistic treasure: a ceramic sculpture of Santa Claus perched atop a John Deere tractor. The artist, Sister Esther Boor, gave it to...
A Script for Better Aging; Our Harvard Doctor's Advice: Diet, Exercise-And a Happy Marriage-Can Add Years to Your Life
Byline: Howard LeWine, M.D. (LeWine is chief health editor for Internet publishing at Harvard Health Publications and a faculty member at Harvard Medical School. He cautions that readers should consult a medical professional for accurate diagnoses.)...
A Wrinkle in Time; Do You Have to Age? How Science Is Finding Ways to Help Your Cells Say No
Byline: Mary Carmichael and Jennifer Barrett Ozols Though death is still as inevitable as taxes, future generations may age more slowly and live significantly longer. Here are five scientists in the vanguard of research, offering new insights into...
Cars: What's in? Tricked Out
Byline: Keith Naughton A big black SUV tricked out with 20-inch chrome rims, smoked-glass taillights and a snarling, double-barreled exhaust cruised a crowded parking lot last week. "You've got some bling," one admirer shouted to the driver. It...
Charity and Chaos; an Insurgency Was Bleeding Aceh before the Tsunami Hit. Food Aid Can't Fix That
Byline: George Wehrfritz and Joe Cochrane (With Eve Conant in Washington and Paul Dillon and Eric Unmacht in Banda Aceh Graphic by Andrew Romano) The American Seahawk chopper descends toward a one-lane road near the ruined village of Lam No. Before...
Diet and Genes; It Isn't Just What You Eat That Can Kill You, and It Isn't Just Your DNA That Can Save You-It's How They Interact
***** CORRECTION: Our Jan. 17 cover illustration ("Diet & Genes") incorrectly shows the DNA double helix spiraling to the left. The double helix spirals to the right. NEWSWEEK regrets the error. ***** Byline: Anne Underwood and Jerry Adler...
Getting Fit with Harry and Chris; for a Better Life, Quit Eating Crap and Train Six Days a Week
Byline: Lisa Miller What can you say about a 70-year-old guy who can kick your butt in spin class? Outdoors, it's below freezing, and, though technically morning, still dark as night. But there he is, bouncing along on his stationary bike like a...
Getting the Whole World in Your Hand; Standouts Were Handheld Devices That Have Become This Century's Version of Swiss Army Knives
Byline: Steven Levy What struck me about last week's Consumer Electronics Show--the huge annual gadget bacchanalia convening, naturally, in Las Vegas--is the buzzword people don't say anymore. Only a few years ago people breathlessly uttered "convergence"...
Heart Disease: Another Culprit to Watch
Byline: Howard LeWine, M.D. (LeWine is chief editor for Internet publishing at Harvard Health Publications at Harvard Medical School. For more about Harvard Health Publications, see health.harvard.edu.) Two new studies confirm what doctors and scientists...
His Dark Materials; after More Than 25 Years and All Those Great, Edgy Roles, Kevin Bacon's Still Footloose and Oscar-Free
Byline: Sean Smith The last time I was at the Oscars," Kevin Bacon says, "was in 1982--to present somebody with a sound-effects-editing award." Despite strong performances in films ranging from "Footloose" to "JFK," "Diner" to "Apollo 13," despite...
In Mississippi, a Step toward Justice
Byline: Andrew Murr and Arian Campo-Flores In the notorious case of three civil-rights workers who were killed in 1964 by alleged Ku Klux Klan members in Philadelphia, Miss., justice has been infuriatingly slow. But last week prosecutors finally...
Less Really Is More; Tips from a Plastic Surgeon on How to Avoid an Overdose
Byline: Z. Paul Lorenc, M.D., with Trish Hall (Lorenc is a clinical professor of plastic surgery at the NYU Medical School. Hall is an editor at The New York Times. Their book, "A Little Work: Behind the Doors of a Park Avenue Plastic Surgeon," was...
Money: The Tough New Job Hunt
Byline: Linda Stern Robert Reid is looking forward to spending his upcoming 50th birthday at work. After 19 months of unemployment and more than 1,000 applications, he landed the job he wanted, as a technician for a Silicon Valley firm. "My biggest...
My Happy Adieu to Professional Sports; after Years of Covering Million-Dollar Players, I Longed for Athletes with More Heart, Less Attitude
Byline: John Millea (Millea lives in Rosemount, Minn.) I have never been attacked by a professional athlete, unless you consider talcum powder a weapon. I also don't spend much time in professional-sports arenas anymore, and I don't miss it. The...
Newsmakers
Byline: Nicki Gostin, Devin Gordon, Jac Chebatoris, Sean Smith Q&A: Candice Bergen Last seen regularly on TV as Murphy Brown, Candice Bergen is joining the cast of "Boston Legal." She talked with NEWSWEEK's Nicki Gostin about her new show,...
Opinion: A Fresh Look at a Hot Issue
Byline: Anthony L. Komaroff, M.D., and Francine Grodstein, SC.D. (Komaroff and Grodstein are from Harvard Medical School and Brigham & Women's Hospital. For more on hormone therapy, go to health.harvard.edu/NEWSWEEK.) Some health choices...
Out of School; Investors Believed Stock Analysts like Jack Grubman Were on Their Side during the Tech Bubble. in 'Blood on the Street,' NEWSWEEK's Charles Gasparino Reveals Just How Rigged the Game Really Was
Byline: <I>From "Blood on the Street" by Charles Gasparino. To be published by Free Press, a division of Simon & Schuster.</I> Jack Grubman, the king of Wall Street's telecom analysts, didn't always hate AT&T. He had worked...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom, left to right: Associated Press, New York Times, People.com, Sports Illustrated, Daily Mirror, BBC News (2), London Times, ABC News, Agence France-Presse, Associated Press (2) "We tell every traitor......
Presidents: Bubba and Dubya-Warming Up
Byline: Richard Wolffe, Tamara Lipper and Eleanor Clift Four years ago George W. Bush used to call him "the shadow" and promised a fresh start by pledging to "uphold the honor and dignity" of the presidency. He even joked to late-night TV's David...
Sri Lanka: Getting Relief to Tiger Territory; Tamil Rebels Are Regarded as Terrorists by Washington. but Will the Tsunami Create New Prospects for Peace?
Byline: Melinda Liu (With Eve Conant in Washington) Not so long ago, you would have been courting death by trying to drive from Colombo to Kilinochchi. Now aid convoys are rolling all the way from the capital to the nerve center of Sri Lanka's rebel...
Tell That to Your Children; Try Denying Social Security Choice to a Coffee Drinker Who Orders a Venti Decaf Nonfat Extra-Hot No Foam with Whip Three-Pump Vanilla Latte
Byline: George Will If you are 62 (old enough to begin drawing Social Security benefits) or even if you are a spring chicken of 50 (old enough to be a member of the second largest secular organization in the nation, AARP, second to the American...
Thanks for the Angst; Indie Icons Bright Eyes Return with a Pair of CDs
Byline: Devin Gordon The 24-year-old singer-songwriter Conor Oberst, who records with a rotating cast of players under the name Bright Eyes, inspires one of two emotions among indie-rock fans: reverence or disdain. There's no middle ground on the...
The Aging Brain; Old Genes, New Findings
Byline: James Bakalar and Anthony L. Komaroff, M.D. (Bakalar is editor of the Harvard Mental Health Letter; Komaroff is editor in chief of the Harvard Health Letter(health.harvard.edu/NEWSWEEK).) Are the changes in the brain that accompany aging...
The Bare Facts on Stripping; I Love the Upside of Stripping Equity out of Your Home for Investing, but the Downside Is Grim. What If Your Income Falls, or You Lose Your Job?
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn (Reporter Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld) Should you strip? No, I'm not talking pole dancing, although ads for financial products sometimes read like soft porn. "Psst," the guys in raincoats hiss, "I know a way to get rich...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker Every Friday night, as we're working late on the magazine, we take a break to eat dinner upstairs in NEWSWEEK's dining room. It's a fun time to relax and tell stories--particularly when our correspondents are visiting from...
Tinseltown Dreams; It's Never Too Late to Become a Star
Byline: David J. Jefferson Of all the battles I expected my parents to face in their 80s, fending off a soul-sucking mummy, a rampaging rhinoceros and a clown-faced serial killer weren't among them. But this is the life my parents lead today, whiling...
Unanswered Questions; Alberto Gonzales Will Likely Be Confirmed. but That Won't Stop the Widening Scandal over Gitmo Detainees
Byline: Michael Isikoff Ibraham Al Qosi's stories seemed fairly outlandish when they first surfaced last fall. In a lawsuit, Al Qosi, a Sudanese accountant apprehended after 9/11 on suspicions of ties to Al Qaeda, charged that he and other detainees...
'Who's Babysitting the Kids?'; A Strange Turn in the Andrea Yates Saga
Byline: Dirk Johnson and Carol Rust Andrea Yates, serving a life sentence for drowning her five children--ages 6 months to 7 years--mostly stares out the window of her cell these days. But it's unclear what she sees. During a recent visit from her...