Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from October 23

A Baptism by Fire; Even before Taking Office, the Newly Elected Secretary-General of the United Nations Is Confronted with a Global Crisis
Byline: Lally Weymouth Last week the members of the United Nations selected a new secretary-general--the current foreign minister of South Korea, Ban Ki Moon, 62. Ban's selection came shortly after North Korea tested a nuclear weapon, something...
After Warner, 'On to Someone Else'
Byline: Jonathan Darman For more than a year, Mark Warner had some of the best buzz of the 2008 presidential sweepstakes thanks to the impressive list of "formers" on his resume: former tech entrepreneur, former venture capitalist, former governor...
Being Bening; 'Running with Scissors' Will Land Her in the Oscar Race Again-This Time with (Gasp) a Few of Her Elders
Byline: Sean Smith Annette Bening is a picture of poise and reserve. She's warm, yes, but not one to use an interview as therapy. She'll chat forever about the brilliance of Maggie Smith or Frances McDormand, ask about the state of the media or...
Beliefwatch: On Purpose
Byline: Lisa Miller Time was, not so long ago, that no one ever said a bad word about Pastor Rick Warren. He was the genius grower of churches, the California whiz who found a magic formula for marketing Christianity to the masses, who hit the jackpot...
Breaking the Faith; the White House Exploits Evangelicals, Says a New Book
Byline: Debra Rosenberg (With Richard Wolffe and Howard Fineman) It was just one more thing the White House didn't need weeks before a midterm election: a tell-all book dissing the administration's dealings with social conservatives. Due out Oct....
Cookbooks: Please Invite Us to Dinner!
Byline: Dorothy Kalins Only every little once in a while does a book come along that changes forever our relationship to American food the way "The Lee Bros. Southern Cookbook," by Matt Lee and Ted Lee, does. Bringing a fresh, contemporary sensibility...
How to Read a Face; the Emerging Field of Social Neuroscience Is Based on the Idea That Human Brains Are 'Wired to Connect.'
Byline: Anne Underwood Carl Marci was jubilant. After a year in therapy, trying to decide whether to propose to his girlfriend, he had finally taken the plunge--and she had said yes! As Marci recounted the story to his shrink days later, his therapist...
Inside the Hero Factory; Clint Eastwood's 'Flags of Our Fathers' Asks Hard Questions about the Way Governments Sell Our Wars
***** CORRECTION: CORRECTION: In "Inside the Hero Factory" (Oct. 23), we said the flag raising at Iwo Jima was conducted by six soldiers, when in fact the flag was hoisted by five Marines and a Navy corpsman. Furthermore, President Bush's " 'Mission...
It's Splitsville; No, We're Not Talking about Divorce, but about a New Way of Dividing Time between Multiple Houses
Byline: Daniel McGinn For centuries, European royalty has kept country estates to complement their urban castles. In 19th-century America, Gilded Age millionaires built Newport mansions as getaways. And for decades, the wealthy have summered in...
Let's Not Crowd Me, I'm Only a Scientist; When I Was a Research Scientist, People Thought My Job Was Boring. Now I'm the Talk of the Town
Byline: Yisroel Brumer (--Brumer lives in Washington, D.C.) Me, a scientist, the subject of interest. Imagine that. Since September 11 and Hurricane Katrina, everyone has wanted to talk about what I do. At dinner parties and in coffee shops, I am...
Let Them Eat Carrots; America Has Used Sanctions since the 1950s, but Nothing Has Stopped North Korea from Getting the Bomb
Byline: Fareed Zakaria; Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com. Despite all the disagreement over who's to blame for the North Korean nuclear test, everyone agrees on the next step: economic sanctions. But does anyone really think that they...
Money Matters; for Most Boomers, Real Estate Is Their Biggest Asset. but Making the Best Use of It Requires Planning
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn (Reporter Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld) Your home is more than your castle, it's your ace in the hole. If you haven't saved enough for retirement, you figure that you can live on the equity you've built up. But in real estate,...
Newsmakers
Byline: Nicki Gostin, Ramin Setoodeh, Jac Chebatoris Q&A: ROD STEWART Rod Stewart has a new album called "Still the Same ... Great Rock Classics of All Time." He spoke with Nicki Gostin. Why did you do an album of '70s songs? Is it a little...
Now on GooTube: The Price Is Right; '$1.65 Billion for YouTube May Not Make Sense in Real Dollars, but It Makes Sense in Google Dollars.'
Byline: Steven Levy Two cultures bumped (if not collided) in the wake of Google's $1.65 billion purchase of the Web video site YouTube. First came the Google conference call announcing the sale. It was a standard affair with leaders of both companies...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources: AP, New York Times, Reuters, ABC, New York Times, WFAN, AP, Reuters, AP, Los Angeles Times "You don't talk about friends that way." White House spokesman Tony Snow, denying claims in a new book--by former White House...
Prohibition II: Good Grief; When Government Restricts Americans' Choices, Ostensibly for Their Own Good, Someone Is Going to Profit from the Paternalism
Byline: George F. Will Perhaps Prohibition II is being launched because Prohibition I worked so well at getting rid of gin. Or maybe the point is to reassure social conservatives that Republicans remain resolved to purify Americans' behavior. Incorrigible...
Real Estate: Not Your Father's Retirement; Boomers Are Redefining the 'Golden Years' by Buying into Communities That Feature Pilates over Shuffleboard, Moving Back Downtown-Or Even Staying Put
Byline: Daniel McGinn and Andrew Murr The 3,000-acre site west of Phoenix isn't much to look at--not yet, anyway. Far from urbanity, past a highway sign warning no services next 38 miles and amid acres of saguaro cactus and creosote bushes, only...
Remembering Michelle; A Campus Mourns a Missing Student Discovered Dead
Byline: Lee Hudson Teslik and Andrew Romano (With Stacey Chase) For a week she was missing, and then she was lost forever. As word spread through the small city of Burlington, Vt., Friday evening that police had finally found the body of University...
Rolling with Pelosi; the GOP Says She's a Loony Lefty, and She Is, in Fact, Unabashedly Liberal. but She's Also a Pol, and May Just Become Madam Speaker
Byline: Karen Breslau, Eleanor Clift and Daren Briscoe (With Holly Bailey, Jonathan Darman and Richard Wolffe) Nancy Pelosi walks out of an airport the way others might flee a burning building. A car is waiting outside and the California congresswoman,...
Technology: Kickin' and Streaming
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh Let's say you missed Thursday's episode of "Ugly Betty" because you were too busy watching "Survivor." (Dumb move, but who are we to judge?) In the olden days--i.e., last year--your best shot, after TiVo, would have been to...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham On a Wednesday afternoon 67 Octobers ago, Franklin D. Roosevelt agreed to see Alexander Sachs, a New York economist and occasional adviser. The topic: weapons of mass destruction. The meeting, which took place at the White House...
The Gospel Music Man; an Exec with Vision Transforms a Traditional Genre
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts This doesn't begin as a family-values story. Max Siegel's father, Bill, a music salesman, was Jewish. His mother, Delores, a beautiful nightclub singer, was African-American. The marriage ended badly; Bill kidnapped 5-year-old...
The Myth of the 'Values' Voter; the Term Is Loaded and Unfair. It Implies That People Who 'Do Not Share Our Values' Aren't Just Wrong but Morally Inferior
Byline: Jonathan Alter Lenny Bruce had a bit in his old stand-up act where he said we should all say the N word (though of course he didn't use that euphemism) over and over, and soon enough the slur would lose its meaning and ability to hurt people....
Trouble at Home; the Iraq War Is Taking an Incalculable Toll on Families. How One Military Couple Is Coping with the Strain
Byline: Catharine Skipp and Dan Ephron (With Michael Hastings in Baghdad) The first year of the deployment was bearable, at least. Jodi Velotta got by on the daily phone calls and e-mail exchanges she had with her husband, Brad, in Iraq. She sent...
'We Are A Nuclear Power'; the Weird and Scary Saga of How an Isolated, Bankrupt Nation Went Nuclear-And How the United States Failed to Stop It
***** CORRECTION: CORRECTION: In " 'We Are a Nuclear Power' " (Oct. 23), we described a contentious encounter between Under Secretary of Defense Stephen Cambone and the then Pacific commander Adm. Dennis Blair. According to both men, the encounter...
Webisodes: A Battle against the Empire
Byline: Jenny Hontz Listen up, "Battlestar Galactica" fans. A war is brewing, fiercer than anything involving Cylon robots. The battlefield: the Internet, where fans can get their "Battlestar" fix with three-minute mini-episodes created especially...