Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 151, No. 01, January 7

2007: Ready, Fire, Aim
Byline: George F. Will Lego blocks were banned by progressives, Che's hair was for sale and Sheryl Crow urged (almost) giving up toilet paper. In 2007, came the revolution. Determined to end the war in Iraq and begin the reign of justice in America,...
A (Dollar) Sign of the Times: It's Not Easy Being Green
Byline: Daniel Gross NEWSWEEK's financial columnist Daniel Gross covered a number of economic calamities in 2007. He writes here about the U.S. currency plunge. In late June, with no local currency in my pocket and a case of jet lag that only...
A Guide through the Valley of Death
Byline: Jeffrey Bartholet Explorers, journalists and adventurers going to Africa have long relied on local guides for advice and protection. Richard Burton, the intrepid Victorian-era explorer, employed a man he dubbed "the End of Time" when he...
A Hungry Crowd Smells Iphone, and Pounces
Byline: Steven Levy Newsweek's senior technology writer Steven Levy is an authority on much-coveted gizmos. This year, one nearly got him trampled. Technology writers are seldom subject to frenzied, Beatlemania-esque paroxysms of public attention....
Alone, Afraid, in the Company of Men Dreaming of Death
Byline: Sami Yousafzai ***** CORRECTION: The Dec. 31/Jan. 7 caption for a photo by Balazs Gardi accompanying the Periscope article "Alone, Afraid, in the Company of Men Dreaming of Death" incorrectly implied that the boy in the picture had been...
A Race We Can All Win
The American system still has inherent advantages, but we can't slow down. China's economic transformation over the past two decades is a fascinating, but still poorly understood, story. Many American politicians have played to voters' economic...
Big Ideas from Boring Old Stump Speeches
Byline: Jonathan Alter Today's throwaway campaign lines often wind up as tomorrow's best programs. Podiatry? Yes, podiatry. On this evening in Perry, Iowa, the presidential candidate is passionate about the issue, and connecting with the audience....
Classified Disinformation
Byline: Michael Isikoff Veteran National Archives Official J. William Leonard learned the hard way the perils of questioning Vice President Dick Cheney. Leonard challenged the Office of the Vice President's claims to be exempt from federal rules...
Exec Desperately Seeks SWF
Byline: Daniel Gross Must be rich. No green card or English required. Send photos and balance sheets to Wall Street. In November the banking giant Citigroup, reeling from subprime losses, sold a 4.9 percent stake to the Abu Dhabi Investment Authority...
Famous in Life, Noted in Passing
In 2007 we said goodbye to the novelist who would be king, the motorcycle daredevil who would be Peter Pan -- and some folks who won't be missed. Norman Mailer, 84 Whatever you thought of him, he never dodged a risk -- writing novels about Jesus,...
Get 'Bad,' Get 'Mad,' and You'll Get Glad
Byline: Joshua Alston Unless you're reading this to kill time until Senior Swim at the Y, you're probably not used to tuning into AMC (formerly American Movie Classics). So if you flip past and see a man wearing just white briefs and a gas mask...
Goodbye, Free Trade; Hello, Mercantilism
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson As countries grow more interdependent, they're also becoming more nationalistic. Here's today's quiz. What do the following have in common: (a) Vladimir Putin; (b) China's currency, the renminbi; (c) the U.S.-Peru...
He's Still A Bit Crushed
Byline: Joshua Alston Everyone knows the most memorable scene in the June finale of "The Sopranos." But a close second had to be the outrageous death of Tony Soprano's nemesis Phil Leotardo (Frank Vincent), who was shot twice, then got his head...
Hillary's Hidden Hand
The former First Lady says her years in the White House give her unmatched experience. A Clinton biographer assesses her powerful behind-the-scenes role. At a recent campaign stop at an Iowa livestock auction, Hillary Rodham Clinton told voters,...
Hit-and-Run Accusations
Byline: Mark Hosenball Eighteen months ago, federal authorities released a court document justifying a raid at the home of Jason Grimsley, an Arizona Diamondbacks relief pitcher suspected of using performance-enhancing drugs. The affidavit named...
How to Prevent A Tragedy
Byline: Pat Wingert Tucked away in rural Southwest Virginia, remote Blacksburg is an unlikely spot for the worst school shooting in U.S. history. Nevertheless, an April 16 rampage by a mentally disturbed student, Seung-Hui Cho, left 32 people dead....
How to Run for President, YouTube Style
Byline: Karen Breslau; with Catharine Skipp Steve Grove believes in the wisdom of crowds. And the smartest people he knows are YouTube's estimated 71 million users, who collectively post and watch as many as 2.5 billion online videos a month. As...
I Flew Halfway around the World -- for This?
Byline: Holly Bailey White House correspondent Holly Bailey spent a week traveling overseas with the vice president. The trip didn't go quite as planned. Breakfast was excellent." Along with six other reporters, I spent more than a week in February...
'I'm Shy. I'm Sweet. I'm Normal. I'm Nice.'
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh It was a tough year for Paris Hilton, but at least she got to spend a couple of hours with NEWSWEEK's Ramin Setoodeh. His repast with the heiress: If you're having lunch with Paris Hilton, be prepared for a long wait. Remember,...
In Britain, A Prime Minister in Waiting
Byline: Stryker McGuire There is no grander office in Whitehall than the tennis-court-size expanse of gilt, silk, burnished wood and hand-woven tapestries afforded Britain's secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs. Still, the current...
In Iraq, A Season of Disquieting Silence
Byline: Babak Dehghanpisheh As NEWSWEEK's Baghdad bureau chief, Babak Dehghanpisheh often faces the war right on his doorstep. His thoughts on the year of the surge: The first rocket streaked low over our house with a crackle at about 8 p.m....
In This Life, or the Next
Byline: Melinda Liu Autocrats worry about Buddha power. In much of Southeast Asia, monks occupy the loftiest of moral high ground. According to the Buddhist concept of reincarnation, misdeeds in past lives affect problems in the current one. Do...
Is Facebook the Next Big Game Console?
Byline: N'Gai Croal Why the social-networking site is a terrific platform for multiplayer games The most unexpectedly rewarding game-related thing I did in 2007 was also the simplest: I finally gave in and joined Facebook. Within a month, I was...
Learning to Love Climate 'Adaptation'
Byline: Sharon Begley It's too late to stop global warming. Now we have to figure out how to survive it. Two words: airport runways. As scientists and policy types figure out what changes will be necessary to cope with global warming, it's obvious...
Mao to Now
Byline: Melinda Liu China is thousands of years old but has been made anew in the last three decades, and my family with it. My eldest brother was 7 years old when the Communists seized power in China. Our parents, who named him Guangyuan --...
Meet the New Generation of War Veterans
In 2007, Newsweek.com launched a blog called Soldier's Home, by Iraq War veteran David Botti. With combat heading into its sixth year, Botti shared his thoughts on battles here at home. I grew up in an era when war veterans were the aging men at...
Ministering to the Needs of His People
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores Presidential contenders from Mike Huckabee to Hillary Clinton are courting the Rev. Samuel Rodriguez with ingratiating calls, offers to meet and VIP invitations to debates. Why all the attention? As president of the National...
Moderates Storm the Religious Battlefield
Byline: Lisa Miller More-modest voices are reclaiming the debate over faith from the bomb throwers. You might think of 2007 as the year the atheists won. They didn't succeed in converting the 86 percent of Americans who say they believe in God...
Olympian Ambitions
Byline: Mark Starr; With Quindlen Krovatin And Jonathan Ansfield In China For Beijing, a smooth Games will take a lot of things -- including winning more than anyone else. All Olympic gold shines brilliantly, though not all equally so. Of China's...
Passing the Baton to the Next Wunderkind
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan When conductor Gustavo Dudamel mounted the podium in his debut with the New York Philharmonic in November, he was carrying something special. Moments before he went onstage for the first of four concerts, the orchestra's...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation Sources: Youtube, AP, New York Times (5) "I didn't do anything. Don't Tase me, bro! Don't Tase me! I didn't do anything! Owwww! Owwww!" University of Florida student Andrew Meyer, 21, screaming to no avail as police shocked...
Perspectives
"There's better things in this world to be thinking about than who served Hillary Clinton at Maid-Rite and who got a tip and who didn't get a tip." Iowa waitress Anita Esterday, on the media circus that ensued after she said that Clinton failed...
Surges and Subprimes Edition
Surge or not, the war goes on. Subprime ain't sublime. Imus got booted, but came back. Polar caps melted, just in time for Al's Nobel. We lined up for $600 iPhones; a doctor named House ran so many tests, our insurance rates went up. We made friends...
Tape Ate My Homework
Byline: David Gates Like most NEWSWEEK writers, I'm a quick study. Somebody dies whom you know a little about, you take a couple of hours to eke out familiarity with solid fact, and you kick in the piece. But unlike most of my colleagues, I'm a...
The 1,440-Minute Cycle
Byline: Andrew Romano As "Stumper," NEWSWEEK's blogger covering the 2008 election, Andrew Romano is obsessed -- understandably -- with watching the press watch the campaign. His take on the "media primary": Is there a dirtier phrase in politics...
The Closing of the American Mind
Byline: Evan Thomas Partisan warriors may love our polarized political culture. Everyone else is turned off, and tuning out. There are, as they say, two Americas. There is the America of the rich and the America of the poor, as Democratic presidential...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham There was broken glass on the floor and garbage bags of shredded documents in the stairwells. On a sunny day in Beijing in 1999 -- dusty, of course, but still bright -- Melinda Liu and I were being given a tour of the ravaged...
The Man in the Middle
Byline: Kevin Peraino It's been a long year for Tony Blair. After stepping down as Britain's prime minister in June, under fire for his Iraq policy, he took on what many consider the hardest job in the Mideast: representative of the Quartet -- the...
The Man Who Revived the Electric Car
Byline: Keith Naughton When General Motors was fingered as the prime suspect in the 2006 documentary "Who Killed the Electric Car?" Bob Lutz's inbox filled with hate mail. "I hope you rot in hell," read one missive to the GM vice chairman, known...
The New New Thing: Same as It Ever Was
Byline: David Gates In the arts, the march of progress has reached its destination. Happy now? It's blasphemous, especially in America, not to believe that every New Year will be more wonderful than the year before -- though in most years, that's...
The People Who Will Change China
Even some critics of the Chinese regime were happy when Beijing was awarded the 2008 Olympics: some felt patriotic joy, others expected the Games might rally activists, as the Olympics had in Seoul 20 years earlier. Party officials would not dare crack...
The Power Behind Cooler, Greener Energy
Byline: Andrew Murr Sossina Haile created a new type of fuel cell by default. In the late '90s, the Caltech scientist had an idea that she thought might dramatically improve fuel cells, the clean technology that converts chemical energy to electricity...
The Rise of A Fierce Yet Fragile Superpower
Byline: Fareed Zakaria The much-heralded advent of China as a global power is no longer a forecast but a reality. Now we, and they, must manage its triumph. For Americans, 2008 is an important election year. But for much of the world, it is likely...
The Rise of A New American Underclass
Byline: Ellis Cose The real issue is not how many people to let in, but how to help them all fit in. Immigration has always evoked outsize, even irrational, reactions. But the irony of this presidential season is that candidates are getting all...
The 'U.S. Americans' Have Spoken
Size doesn't always matter. In the Internet age, a minute or two of footage can reach millions and change lives. Here are 2007's best in "microculture": viral videos, podcasts, blogs, advertisements. Viral Videos MISS South Carolina Teen USA:...
The View from Both Sides
Byline: Monica Campbell On the campaign trail this year, no issue burned hotter than immigration--particularly on the Republican side, where each candidate seemed determined to prove that he would build a taller fence than the next guy. For all...
The Year in Perspectives
Byline: Quotation Sources: AP, USA Today, Reuters, Fox, AP, NBC, CNN Iraq surged. California burned. Scooter squirmed. And Paris got sent to the slammer. The cartoons and quotes of 2007. "I've told people that if you're interested in avoiding...
They Put a Guitar Hero in Every House
Byline: N'Gai Croal 'It was hard to realize that making a fun game just isn't enough to be a successful game developer.' Like John Lennon and Paul McCartney (minus the bitter split), like Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell (without the tragic deaths)...
Twice Touched by Fire, This Californian Is Still Dreamin'
Byline: Jamie Reno Many southern California residents will head into this holiday season still grappling with the ruins of October's wildfires. For NEWSWEEK's Jamie Reno, it was an all-too-familiar experience. Our San Diego reporter shares his tale...
Unconventional, Bee-Swallowing Reformer
Byline: Martha Brant Michelle Rhee got a reality check in her first year of teaching, in 1993. The second graders at Harlem Park Elementary in a tough neighborhood in Baltimore were hard enough to keep in their seats, let alone teach anything. One...
Wanted: Candidates with Very 'Long Tails'
Byline: Andrew Romano Once invisible, outsider politicians are using the Web and getting noticed. It's May 1988, and the slender 53-year-old obstetrician (and former four-term congressman) has just arrived at Seattle airport. Only three supporters...
What A Scrabulous Year!
Byline: N'gai Croal Most journalists who write about videogames compile a list of the year's best games. At NEWSWEEK's Level Up blog, written by yours truly, N'Gai Croal, I'd rather single out the year's most important games. Here's my top five:...
When You Wish upon a Movie Star
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh Amy Adams plays a princess in the movies, but in real life she's no Sleeping Beauty. In fact, she's not sleeping much at all. "I'm having insomnia," Adams says. "It's not the falling asleep. It's the waking up, and then you're...