Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 131, No. 11, March 16

A Best Seller Gets Better; the Newest PalmPilot Will Have You Beaming
Next month, the gadget freak in the cubicle next to yours will take out a small charcoal-gray rectangle and point it at you like a "Star Trek" phaser. But don't be alarmed; she's just showing off the latest PalmPilot. Earlier versions of Palm...
A Cheaper Way to Phone; Internet Long-Distance Services Can Save You Money
Step aside, Geeks. Internet telephony is looking for Joe Six-pack. It's no longer necessary to wrestle with a personal computer in order to make low-cost calls over the Internet. You can easily use the Web for dialing Granny in Omaha or Osaka,...
Air Apparent
At 19, Kobe Bryant is facing his toughest test: proving himself the NBAs Next Big Thing Michael Jordan was still fighting the flu and exhausted by his all-star game duel with Kobe Bryant. But as he left the Madison Square Garden floor, Jordan...
America's Uneasy Export: It's a Hard Life for U.S. Muslims in the West Bank
At lunch time, the bridge Acadamy seems a lot like any American highschool. Kids play basketball, eat junk food, gossip. Boys favor baggy jeans, slung low to reveal the waistbands of their boxer shorts; they greet each other in ghetto-speak: "Wassup?"...
A Post-PC Future?
The only thing I'd rather own than Windows is English. Then I could charge you $249 for the right to speak. Techies aren't usually known for their sense of humor, but last week Scott McNealy, chief executive of Sun Microsystems, was working...
Coloring the Truth
As `Primary Colors' -- the tale of a Southern pol with a weakness for women -- comes to the screen, will the glitzy brew of fact and fiction hurt Clinton? The exterior shot is Edward Hopper, if he'd painted politics: a lonely doughnut shop late...
From Here to There: The Physics of Time Travel
Time Travel--it's the dream of every science-fiction hack who's ever picked up a pen, and the fantasy of many of the rest of us, too. How wonderful to go back and right the wrongs of the past (or at least deliver that witty riposte you didn't...
From Soups to Lunch; Shop for Groceries without Leaving the Den
Grocery shopping is few people's idea of a good time. It's a repetitive task most would like to fob off on somebody, else. That someone could be a computer--why squeeze the Charmin when Mr. Chips can do it for you? The concept is simple:...
Healer of Hearts
Dean Ornish's low-tech methods could transform American medicine. But the doctor is still striving to transform himself. Dr. Dean Ornish knows the value of serenity. "When your mind is quiet," he says, "you lose your sense of separateness and...
Heaven's Gatekeepers: They Give the People What They Want: Talkative Spirits and a Laid-Back God
Does the name Rose mean anything to you? Someone who passed over. Yes, I said. Someone on your mother's side... No. Your father's side. Your father's mother? I had an aunt by that name. Yes. OK. Something about coins. A Lincoln-cent album, a...
Is Love the Best Drug?
Call it the Pennsylvania paradox. Until about 1965, the people of Roseto, a small town in the eastern part of the state, seemed all but immune to heart disease. They smoked as much as the folks in nearby Bangor. They ate similar food, and...
Lateline
You don't usually think of G. Gordon Liddy, Ralph Nader, Dr. Joycelyn Elders and the word "comedy" in the same sentence. OK, well, maybe you do with Liddy. But these are just three of the many wacky public figures who make cameos on "Lateline"...
Making Tobacco Say 'Aaaaah.' (Former Surgeon Generl C. Everett Coop and Former FDA Commissioner David Kessler Look to Enforce the Legal Settlement with the Tobacco industry)(Brief Article)
It was the last day of August, and Bill Clinton, vacationing on Martha's Vineyard, ran into C. Everett Koop, the former surgeon general. Each man had come to the island for the Labor Day weekend. But Koop wasn't taking a holiday. He used the...
Mama Is a Biker Chick: Fighting Cancer Has Rekindled My Love for Motorcycles and the Freedom of the Open Road
At 47, I am a homemaker who recently caught myself doing something adolescent boys have done for years: hiding magazines under my bed. With titles like Hot XL and Iron Horse, they featured lots of leather and action shots, and I just didn't want...
Me
Henry Kissinger, in jest, when asked at Times 75th-anniversary bash to name a man who's changed the course of events over the last 75 years "It's always something like, `Why are you doing this?' And I say, `I thought maybe it would be kind of fun'"....
More 'Ethnic Cleansing'?
There they go again. Enraged by the killing of two comrades in an ambush, Serbian attackers went on a rampage, slaughtering the first 11 people they captured. Muslim women and children fled into the hills while the men stayed behind to defend...
One on One with SI: ESPN Aims Squarely at Sports Illustrated, as the Cable Network Launches Its Own Sports Magazine
Nearly a decade ago, Mark Mulvoy, then managing editor of Sports Illustrated, called his staff together and said, "Ladies and gentlemen, I have met the enemy, and it is ESPN." Mulvoy, a channel-surfing sports fanatic, had noticed that ESPN's...
Permanently Powerful? the Isolated and Beleaguered People of Baghdad Can't Imagine Life without Their Omnipresent President
The Biblical City of Babylon lies buried under the earth about an hour south of Baghdad. Here, on the banks of the Euphrates River, King Nebuchadnezzar built his hanging gardens--one of the world's seven wonders--during the last great Babylonian...
Rupert's Black Eye
Heinrich Heine, the 19th-century German poet, once observed, "No author is a man of genius to his publisher." Especially when the publisher is media mogul Rupert Murdoch, whose empire includes HarperCollins, and the author is Chris Patten, the...
Saddam's Nightmare
At a small port in the United Arab Emirates, an Iraqi sailor watches 5,000 tons of diesel being pumped from his rusty barge into tanker trucks. This is his livelihood, smuggling Iraqi diesel down the Persian Gulf. The business is lucrative,...
Sprewell Rebounds into the Game
In the bible, Solomon's wise arbitration spared a baby. In real-world arbitration, though, there's an unfortunate tendency to divide the child. That seemed the case last week when an arbitrator settled the matter of Latrell Sprewell, the NBA...
The McDonagh Effect: A New Playwright Blends Irish and American, Theater and Movies, Plus a Dash of Punk
Meeting Martin McDonagh, the sensational 27-year-old Irish playwright, in a Manhattan coffee shop sounds like a good idea. After all, this is the guy who got famously sozzled at London's Savoy Hotel when accepting a 1996 award for most promising...
The New Islam
The children of Muslim immigrants who came to America in the `60s are coming of age. Both pious and modern, they are the future of the faith In El Cerrito, Calif., Shahed Amanullah knows it's time to pray, not by a muezzin's call from a mosque...
The War over Weed
The sign behind the "bud bar" at the Cannabis Cultivators' Club in San Francisco reads like the last gasp of a faltering crusade. "We will overcome again," it proclaims. "Fight peacefully. Be strong." Behind the counter, volunteers prepare nickel...
The World According to Garth
He's sold 67 million records. He's the most-loved country singer in history. Why has Nashville turned on him? Behind the good ole boy persona lurks a tough businessman. Mr. Brooks, meet Mr. Brooks. Sometimes Garth Brooks forgets that he's not...
Twilight
A Film-Noir hero always has a few miles on him. He's been a cop, a husband, a drunk; now he's a private eye, a divorce and a teetotaler. Going through that mill has given him the survivor's cynicism he needs in the viper pit of off-boulevard...
Woman Trouble
It's not just Monica. Bill Clinton faces a swirl of sexual allegations, from Hot Springs to the governor's mansion--and investigators are trying to find out if his past was prologue. They were the talk of the hot springs high School class of...