Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 132, No. 4, July 27

Alone at Last
From the Amazon to Alaska, Newsweek's correspondents searched the globe for unspoiled, unique destinations for your next vacation. But hurry! Thayer Lake Lodge Admiralty Island, Alaska set deep in the northern bush, a 30-minute float-plane ride from...
A Mountain Manhunt
One of the FBI's 10 Most Wanted, Eric Rudolph--suspected bomber and right-wing survivalist--is on the run from the Feds. A journey through the underbrush of a fugitive's mind and motives. The agent from the georgia bureau of investi- gation, a veteran...
A Pop Quiz for Wall Street
So Far, Passing Grades for tom kersting, atrading-systems manager at A.G. Edwards in St. Louis, last Monday was Dec. 29, 1999. At 9:10 a.m., Central Virtual Time, he swung into action. He sold 100 shares of Intel at $67, bought Cisco at $78 and Dell...
Big, Empty Lots
For GM and the union, the strike is about long-term issues. But what if we want to buy a Chevy? For mark eddins, this was sup- posed to be a summer to make money. The veteran Chevrolet dealer just spent $11 million to relocate his Dallas showroom, which...
Bragging Rights
The most 'valuable' company? Microsoft. If you're into symbolism, you'll love the latest development in the battle between General Electric and Microsoft. No, I'm not talking about which company gets the most wet kisses from the media, or whether GE...
Diva Rising: Meet the Other Monica
These days, if you re- fer to Monica, most people think you mean Lewinsky. But in the world of R&B, people know Monica as a 17-year-old Atlanta-born singer with a voice as big as Aretha's and street smarts to match. Her debut album, "Miss Thang,"...
Don't Call Her Tigress Se Ri Pak, the Hottest Golfer since You-Know-Who
They whooped for nancy lopez, a bit of appreciation for a veteran. But at the JAL Big Apple Classic in New Rochelle, N.Y., last week, the galleries were there to see the new kid. They were out in numbers, perhaps 2,000 strong even in midweek. And they...
Downscale Moves Up
With a breezy mix of low-priced threads and high-concept style, Old Navy's sales are soaring. The bargain basement never looked so good. On a recent summer day, Vicki White, 43, piles her two kids into the car, travels to a mall on Chicago's North Side...
Going to War over Gays
In a new ad blitz, conservatives try to convince homosexuals to convert to the straight and narrow Janet folger saw an opening. The national director of the Center for Reclaiming America--a conservative Christian organization run by televangelist Dr....
HMOs under the Knife
The capital races to crack down on managed care Ted kennedy was on the dais, an honored elder. behind him, in mute solidarity, stood doctors and nurses in long white lab coats. At the podium, Rep. Greg Ganske, an Iowa Republican, bore witness to the...
Is This Too Good to Last?
Well, yes. Enjoy the boom while we've got it, because sooner or later, it will be history. The American economy is sailing along so smoothly (unemployment 4.5 percent, near-record stock prices, strong home sales) that it seems unpatriotic to ask the...
Nursing-Home Verdicts: There's Guilt All Round
Boomers sue on their parents' behalf, and win big Partially paralyzed by a stroke and suffering from diabetes, Reba Gregory moved to the Beverly Manor nursing home in Yreka, Calif., in 1993. "We just had to trust that they would take good care of her...
Taking off, Tuning In
With e-mail and voice mail, it's hard to leave the office behind. And many Americans prefer to stay plugged in. When you're on vacation, the things that interest you most may be the ruins of toppled dynasties, or the sight of a predatory beast defending...
The Buzz Machine
##Sarah Van^Marin, Rick Boven We're a nation of buzzaholics, addicted to word of mouth about the latest thing in books, movies-- even Taco Bell ads. What's buzz? What's hype? Plus: Newsweek picks the top buzzmakers of themoment. Harry knowles knows...
The Faces of Famine
Over and over, the pornography of African suffering simply rewards the oppressors Here we go again. skeletal, starving africans are back in the news, this time from Sudan. If you are moved--and you'd have to be heartless not to be--operators are standing...
The Lost Decade
A return to the Hotel Pierre for cafe, red marble tiles, potted palms, chandeliers, champagnel Pierre for cafe, red marble tiles, Unable to rev up Japan's lagging economy, Hashimoto quits after an election defeat. A successor will be chosen this week,...
There's Something in the Hair
Cameron Diaz's career is starting to gel Sure, cameron diaz looks beauti- ful, smiling out at you from all those glossy magazine covers. But don't love her because she's beautiful. Love her because she can manage to look beautiful and sublimely silly...
The Trouble with Tribes
In ethnic war zones, when is a child not a child? When he's an enemy of the blood. We are confronted with so many grisly stories every day that it is hard to know why certain of them get to you more than others, in a particularly stinging, long-lasting...
Two for the Road
Another day, another city on a summer rock tour. When Dave Matthews and Tori Amos hit the same town, they sat down and talked shop. At a recent rock festival in Brussels, Tori Amos and Dave Matthews met for the first time. They seem an unlikely pair:...
Vaccine Revolution
Researchers are racing to immunize us against food poisoning, earaches and cocaine addiction--with vaccines that don't require needles Back in the dark ages, circa 1981, children all over the world were dying of bacterial meningitis. Hemophilus influenza...
What Did the Agents See?
The special prosecutor wants to know--and now the Secret Service will have to tell him Monica lewinsky was wait- ing at the gate. At dusk on Dec. 28, 1997, the former White House intern arrived at the west entrance of the White House, her arms full...
Why Can't We Get Away?
If you're planning a trip this season, be warned: so is everyone else. And despite the crowds and stress, most people will have a great time. They are the orphans of summer, tourists shuffling toward distant ticket counters, huddled around carousels...
Witnessing the Inferno
Steven Spielberg shows us the terror of combat Steven spielberg has taken Hollywood's depiction of war to a new level. He does it right at the start of Saving Private Ryan, in a 25-minute sequence depicting the landing of American forces on Omaha Beach...