Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 134, No. 4, July 26

A Desperate Search at Sea: They Vanished in the Dark of Night, and by the Next Day, an Armada Had Gathered Just off Martha's Vineyard, Hoping for a Rescue. Instead, the Waves Brought Reason to Grieve
There were, at first, the usual false reports. Debris spotted off Long Island. The ping of what seemed to be an airplane's beacon from deep under the waves off Montauk. Both were dismissed--wrong place, wrong kind. But shortly after noon, on a Saturday...
Among the Believers: With His Winning Charm and User-Friendly Conservatism, George W. Bush Has Neutralized-At Least for Now-His Family's Old Enemies on the Reagan Right
In the old days--when Ronald Reagan was on the rise--the Virginia suburbs of Washington were enemy turf for a candidate named Bush. The conservative movement was based there, in storefronts on busy highways, deploying new grass-roots techniques--direct-mail...
Caught in the 'Iron Triangle', It Takes a Checkbook., A Money Mess in Switzerland, Talk Talk, in Vietnam, a Shot in the Dark, A Parent's New Best Friend, Fly Me to the Moon Shadow, Blame Canada, Hey Dad, You've Got Dysentery!, Play It Where It Lies, Sam
Until last week, the George W. Bush campaign had been nearly flawless. But then the dream campaign, credited to a triumvirate of longtime Bush advisers known as the Iron Triangle, was forced to move quickly to correct its first mistake. The quietly...
Charmed Yet Cursed: A Tragic Plane Crash in the Atlantic Marks a Sad New Chapter in the Dramatic Saga of the Kennedy Family, in Which Glamour, Beauty and High Ideals Have So Often Been Shattered by Sudden Disaster
They were going to a wedding. A family wedding on Cape Cod that promised jokes and fun and dozens of happy Kennedy cousins. Instead, last Saturday, spotter planes and patrol boats crisscrossed the ocean off Martha's Vineyard, searching for signs of...
Cheerleaders vs. the Grumps: Does the Euphoric Economy Reflect Higher Productivity or Old-Fashioned 'Animal Spirits'?
Call them cheerleaders and grumps--they're rivals in the debate over the economy. Cheerleaders are believers. They see today's boom as a glorious reward for superior U.S. technology, management and faith in markets. The grumps are skeptics. Without...
He Said, She Said: Rap's No. 1 Battle, Pitch-Perfect Pedro, Who Knew? the 'Who's the Boss' Stars Can Act., the Trials of Elton John
Six months ago, a scrub was nothing but a brush. But since TLC redefined the word to describe a guy who's all flash and no cash, their megahit "No Scrubs" has become an anthem for fly girls everywhere. Rap trio Sporty Thievz answered back for the fellas...
Huddling against History: The Family Refuses to Live in the Past, Preferring Always to Look Ahead, Even as They Keep an Eye out for Those Left Behind
When Caroline Kennedy married Edwin Schlossberg in the summer of 1986 at Hyannis, her brother made a toast. John Kennedy spoke in far more moving words than I can remember about three people: his "mummy" (Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis), his beloved sister...
'I Feel More like Princess Di': A Friend and Historian on the Everyday JFK Jr.the Scion's Politics, Passions and Wry Take on Life
Strange to think of him now, with his self-deprecating smile and jarring humility, his custom-tailored suit and his perfect posture, his soft handshake and fast-paced New York walk, which he had honed, I always assumed, as a mechanism to avoid the...
Is Your HMO Too Stingy? under a Texas Law, They Rope 'Em and Throw 'Em
Anne Berends, a Dallas art teacher, felt too exhausted to go home from the hospital after delivering her first child last summer. She had endured 28 hours of labor, a forceps delivery and a heavy loss of blood. Nonetheless, her HMO tried to shove her...
Living with the Myth: He Could Have Been Crushed by the Weight of One of the World's Most Famous Names, but Instead Learned How to Cope with Celebrity-And Make His Own Way, on His Own Terms. the Real Face of an American Icon
As a schoolboy, John F. Kennedy Jr. was playful, a prankster, a little hyperactive, and he liked to give the Secret Service the slip. One day, "Lark" (his Secret Service code name) eluded his guardians in Central Park and was promptly mugged by a thief...
Media's Week of Wampum: Racing to Cash in on the Internet Frenzy, Entertainment Companies Are Minting Their Own Supercharged Dot.com Issues
Making wampum is turning into one of corporate America's fastest-growing businesses. No, companies like General Electric, Disney and Time Warner haven't taken to carving beads out of seashells, the way East Coast American Indians once did. Rather,...
NATO's Game of Chicken: Victory over Milosevic-Never Really in Doubt-Was Actually a Pretty Close Call
It was billed as the biggest, bloodiest strike of the war. On June 7, U.S. B-52s dropped several cluster bombs on Yugoslav forces at Mount Pastrik, a strategic battlefield on the Kosovo-Albanian border. The assault, one of the final salvos in a 78-day...
Nowhere to Go for Help: Isolated in Antarctica, a Woman Faces a Cancer Scare
A seven-and-a-half-hour flight to the most isolated outpost on the planet is a tough mission. But once the Air Force C-141 Starlifter dropped its cargo into the bitterly cold Antarctic night, the flight crew got to turn around and go home. Matters...
Perspectives
"It's hard not to be mindful of the historical resonance here. There is a collective pain we all feel for this family." Thurgood Marshall Jr., Clinton administration cabinet secretary, on news that the plane carrying John F. Kennedy Jr., his wife...
Shoot the Moon: Thirty Years after the First Lunar Landing Showed Us a Boring, Lifeless World, Scientists Are Revising Their Notions of Our Moon and of the 65 Others in the Solar System. Some of These Satellites May Harbor the Conditions for Life, and Promise to Hint How Life Begins or Fails. in Short, Moons Rock
Two days before the big event, mission control at NASA Ames Research Center in California will send the command, radioing a signal 240,000 miles to the Lunar Prospector orbiting the moon. The signal will fire engines to boost the polar-bear-size craft...
Summertime and Litigiousness Is Easy: Our Lawsuit-Happy Society Forced Me to Take Drastic Measures to Keep Neighborhood Kids out of My Pool
The unbearable heat of midsummer eases a little at dusk, and I go into my yard to water the impatiens and hibiscus. I'm taken by the stillness of the swimming pool, the scent of honeysuckle and ginger, the glint of streetlight on razor wire. Razor...
The Beginning of the End? Raised on a Too-Strict Diet of Totalitarian Islam, Young Iranians Could Forge the First Modern-And Moderate-Islamic Society
Mohammed Khatami does not look like Mikhail Gorbachev. Iran's president is bearded and robed in high-clerical fashion. There's no birthmark on his forehead that needs airbrushing. Yet Khatami is often called "Ayatollah Gorbachev," and with good reason....
The End of the Line: The Accused Serial Murderer Known as the 'Railroad Killer' Gives Up and Begins the Fight for His Own Life
Twenty-two days after the FBI put him on its "10 Most Wanted" list, Angel Leoncio Reyes Maturino Resendez walked to the middle of the Ysleta Bridge over the Rio Grande and shook hands with Texas Ranger Andrew (Drew) Carter on the American side. Already...
The Leader of the Pack: After Chemotherapy, Lance Armstrong Is on a Roll
Lance Armstrong couldn't figure out what was wrong with him. In late 1996, the champion American bicycle racer was feeling tired and sore, and his performance was beginning to suffer. At the time, he didn't worry too much about it. But when he started...
The Woman Who Won His Heart: She Had an Uncommon Grace and Made Him Think. Now the Bessettes Face the Loss of Two Daughters
It had to be destiny. John Kennedy had been linked to some of the most talked-about women in the world. He had jogged in Central Park with Madonna. He had gone deep-powder skiing in Telluride, Colo., with Daryl Hannah. But when The Sexiest Man Alive...