Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 135, No. 13, March 27

A Firebrand's Long Run: The Hunt for H. Rap Brown after a Deadly Shoot-Out
From the time he settled quietly into Atlanta's West End in 1976, Imam Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin, 56, cut two distinct profiles. Neighbors knew him as a forceful cleric who ran a grocery store and worked to drive drug dealers from the area. But to local...
A Rabbi Argues with Jesus: A Noted Talmudic Scholar Insists That Jews Must Remain Faithful to the Words of the Torah
Imagine walking on a dusty road in Galilee nearly 2,000 years ago and meeting up with a small band of youngsters, led by a young man. The leader's presence catches your attention: he talks, the others listen, respond, argue, obey--care what he says,...
A Tale of Two Papers: Stop the Presses. Savvy Tribune Co. Snatches Up Times Mirror after Its Owners Grow Impatient with CEO Mark Willes
At first glance, last week's sale of Times Mirror to the Tribune Co. looks like your garden-variety multibillion-dollar media deal, with the happy buyer and the ostensibly happy seller babbling about "synergies" and such. But offstage, Times Mirror's...
A Thriller on the Net: Stephen King's E-Book Sold Half a Million Copies on the Web. It Could Signal a Scary Future for Publishers
Folks in publishing are still trying to figure out what happened last week. One thing they think they know is that they've just seen the fastest-selling book of all time, Stephen King's "Riding the Bullet"--if you can call it "sales" when many of the...
A Ticket to Private School: The Idea Is Catching On: If Public Schools Are Failing, Then Give Kids 'Vouchers' for a Private Education. the Debate in the Campaign, in the Courts-And in Families
Prime time at the Johnson house. Time for "7th Heaven" on the WB. But Mom is home, and the kids know what that means: don't even think about TV until the homework is done. Brandon has polynomials to divide for pre-algebra. Tony has to read up on mollusks...
Cops and Docs Forever: Two Shows Take on TV's Most Well-Worn Formats
Peter Berg is not happy about the time slot ABC has assigned his new show, "Wonderland," and who can blame him? It's bad enough that "Wonderland" will debut next Thursday opposite "ER," the highest-rated non-Regis show in the country. Adding insult...
Drugstore Dangers: Medication Mix-Ups Are Increasing as the Number of Prescriptions Grows Each Year. Here Are the Hazards, and the Steps You Can Take to Protect Yourself
Teresa Vasquez was not worried when she couldn't read her husband's prescription for heart medication. Who can read a doctor's scrawl? Anyway, that was the pharmacist's job. But fate was against the Monahans, Texas, woman that day in June 1995. As...
Hell in a Heavenly Place: Tracking the Killers of a Pair of Teenage Travelers
They met at Antioch college and quickly became best friends--Shaun Sellers and the two Emilys: Emily Howell, from Lexington, Ky., and Emily Eagen, from Ann Arbor, Mich. Participants in Antioch's cooperative education program, Sellers and Emily Howell...
High Noon in Gun Valley: Smith & Wesson's Deal with Clinton on New Safety Rules Is Roiling the Gun Lobby. the Inside Story of the Secret Breakthrough
Ed Shultz is a hard guy to figure, even to fellow gunmakers. In a business often defined by ideology, Smith & Wesson's CEO is the ultimate pragmatist. A gruff Midwesterner, Shultz got his start in metals and office furniture--not firearms--and...
Hong Kong to Hollywood: A Full Roundhouse of Applause for the Kicky Jet Li
If Chow Yun-Fat is the Cary Grant of Hong Kong action movies and Jackie Chan their Buster Keaton, Jet Li is their Fred Astaire. But we're pretty sure that Astaire never used Ginger Rogers as a lethal weapon. In just one of the incredible action sequences...
In His Own Words: A Run-In with a Rat, Spying in East Germany, Fighting the Chechens and Eating Sushi with Yeltsin. Key Moments in the Life of the New Kremlin Leader
He has been ruling Russia for nearly three months, but Vladimir Putin remains largely unknown. That's not entirely surprising; Kremlin rulers--even in the post-Soviet era--have traditionally tried to limit the spread of information about themselves....
Is Technology Making Us Intimate Strangers? Cell Phones and Beepers Keep Us in Touch, but They Also Keep Us from the Best of Ourselves and Others
Every day when I walk out of my house I feel surrounded. Surrounded by mere civilians so loaded down with the latest equipment that any military commander would be envious. Cell phones, beepers, headsets, watches that both tell time and give good e-mail--smart,...
It Was a Wonderful Life: A Farewell to the Magazine That Chronicled the American Century in Pictures, from the Beaches of Normandy to the Hills of Hollywood
During World War II, in the darkest days of the London blitz when fire engines waged a desperate battle against blazes started by German bombs, the British government appealed to Londoners to take shallow baths, in order to save water for the firemen's...
Lurching to Oscar Night: First They Lost the Ballots, Then the Statues. but the Oscars Really Will Happen This Week-And the Race Is Not as Close as Some Think
We may not know who's going to win the Oscars, but you can be sure what Billy Crystal is going to skewer when he takes the stage on March 26--the bedeviled Oscars themselves. There's plenty to joke about: The 4,200 ballots that temporarily disappeared...
Mediation before Malpractice Suits? for Patients, Litigation Is Expensive and Hard to Win. the Case for Trying Talking Instead of Suing
Like any toddler, the 3-year-old was moving fast as she followed her mother into the physician's examining room. The mother had been treated for a leg burn several days earlier and was back for a routine follow-up exam. As they waited for the doctor,...
Not Just Fun and Games
Many readers questioned the choice of PlayStation 2 as our March 6 cover subject. "Was a new computer-game machine really the most important topic of the week?" asked one. Another chided us for succumbing to "a virtual obsession with all things cyber."...
Perspectives
"Well, then, how come he didn't win?" GOP presidential candidate George W. Bush, when reminded that his challenger John McCain produced record voter turnout in the primaries "Thank you for your e-mail. This Internet of yours is a wonderful invention."...
Pointing to Trouble: Taiwan Voters Elect a Pro-Independence President-And Prove That Politics Is Not Always Local. Communist Leaders in Beijing Are Unhappy, and Washington Is Wary. Is a Clash Inevitable?
At odds for half a century, two bitter enemies confront each other at close range, both heavily armed, neither willing to back down. That was the situation facing President Clinton as he flew off last Saturday on his visit to India and Pakistan. But...
'The Bogeyman Came': The Ramseys Fend off Accusations They Killed Their Little Girl
For more than three years, John and Patsy Ramsey have largely kept silent about the murder of their 6-year-old daughter, JonBenet, who was found strangled in the basement of their Boulder, Colo., home on the day after Christmas 1996. According to the...
The Karma of the Gospel: A Spiritual Leader Finds Connections between Christian Teachings and His Own Traditions
As a Buddhist, my attitude toward Jesus Christ is that he was either a fully enlightened being, or a bodhisattva of a very high spiritual realization. I see common notes between Buddhism and Christianity. Here are a few: Transfiguration. In Buddhism,...
The Long Road to Reconciliation: A Distinguished Historian Says the Pope's Efforts to Bring Many Faiths Together Make Him a Role Model for All Children of God
Reconciliation, a key word in the Christian vocabulary, is the goal of Pope John Paul II's turn-of-the-millennium activity. Nowhere is the effort to reconcile and be reconciled more evident than in two acts for which the media keep using the word "unprecedented."...
The Man Can't Stop Our Music: A Little Program Called Napster Could Shake, Rattle and Roll the Music Industry-And the Net
If you want to know where a Silicon Valley-ite stands in the ongoing war for the soul of the Internet, just ask him or her what the buzzword is these days. Many will tell you it is "B2B," a backslapping shorthand for e-schemes directed to the "business...
The Man Who Would Be Tsar: Will an Ex-KGB Man Restore Law and Order, or Order without Law? What the Rise of Putin Says about the Russian Soul
It is the winter of 1999. Boris Yeltsin, aging and ill, decides he has had enough. He and his family are hounded by allegations of corruption; his country, in the midst of a disastrous economic decline, is at war again in Chechnya. On the eve of the...
The Nature of Nurturing: A New Study Finds That How Parents Treat a Child Can Shape Which of His Genes Turn On
Since people, not to mention families, are so infernally complicated, consider the rat. As soon as their wriggly little pups are born, rat mothers lick and groom them, but like mothers of other species they vary in how obsessive they are about getting...
The Other Jesus: To Christians, He Is the Son of God. but the World's Other Great Religions Have Their Own Visions of a Legendary Figure
Christ is absolutely original and absolutely unique. If He were only a wise man like Socrates, if He were a prophet like Muhammad, if He were enlightened like the Buddha, without doubt He would not be what He is. --John Paul II Ever since his...
The Pilgrimage: On His Historic Trip to the Holy Land, Pope John Paul II Will Call for Peace and Reconciliation as He Visits Ancient Sites Holy to Jews, Christians, and Muslims. Planned Papal Stops:
Mount Nebo: The pope will visit the site Christians believe is Moses' resting place. Wadi al-Kharrar: On the eastern bank of the Jordan River. Jordanians believe this is where Jesus was baptized. (Israel has a rival site.) Qasr al-Yahud: In...
The Reasonable Woman Standard: What's Good for the Goose Is Good for the Gander, and Just about Everyone Else as Well
This may sound strange coming from a life-long feminist, but I've had it with Women's History Month. It's hard for me to believe that Betty Friedan wrote "The Feminine Mystique," protesters trashed the Miss America Pageant and countless women hazarded...