Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from June 26

A Coda to the Cold War
Religion, wrote Lenin, is a "vile contagion of the most abominable kind." But it was useful cover for the Kremlin's spies. Revived during the Great Patriotic War against Hitler in 1943, the Russian Orthodox Church was controlled by the Fifth Directorate...
All Together Now
Early in March, Kim Jong Il had a dress rehearsal for his coming-out party. North Korea's shadowy "Great Leader" dropped in at the Chinese Embassy in Pyongyang and toasted stunned embassy staffers--he had brought his own wineglass--cracking jokes and...
A Press Lord's Side of the Story
Vladimir Gusinsky, the head of the Media-Most holding company, talked with NEWSWEEK contributor Yevgenia Albats after he was released from Butyrka prison. Excerpts: Why were you arrested? I was called up by the office of the prosecutor general...
A Return to Wilding
It was Ashanna Cover's first-ever trip to New York's Central Park, and it seemed like the perfect day for it. The National Puerto Rican Day Parade is always a festive occasion, and basking in the user-friendly image New York now enjoys, about 1 million...
A War over Witnesses
To a degree that still troubles veteran lawyers, the case against Gary Graham depended on the testimony of a single eyewitness. Graham, who is scheduled to die by lethal injection this Thursday in Huntsville, Texas, was found guilty of shooting a drug...
A Whole Lotta Lil' Kim
BEING A HIP-HOP DIVA HAS some non-negotiable requirements. You gotta rock the ice (i.e., sport diamonds), you gotta wear the designers (Dolce & Gabbana, Gucci) and, most important, you gotta have the hair. Missy Elliott and Mary J. Blige won't...
Breaking through the Ultimate Glass Ceiling
It won't happen this year. but the next chance at the White House is only four years away, and more women than you might think are already laying the groundwork for their own presidential bids. Bolstered by changing public attitudes, women in politics...
Edgar's Exit Strategy
If Seagram CEO Edgar Bronfman Jr. ever sweated, he was cool enough to do it in private. Since the mid-1990s, the part-time songwriter labored to turn his family's booze empire into a global entertainment giant. First, he invested in Time Warner, then...
Getting Down to Funny Business
Some business writers see mergers and stock-market crashes, and try to explain why they happened. Andy Borowitz dreams of deals that never were. Borowitz, 42, spent his first life in Hollywood, writing for TV and helping create "The Fresh Prince of...
Gliding to a Soft Landing?
Modern economics makes itself intelligible by adopting everyday analogies. If inflation worsens, we say the economy is "overheating." If the Federal Reserve raises interest rates, it's "applying the brakes." If it cuts rates, it's "stepping on the...
Great Eggscape: Chickens Plot Break from Tweedy's!
There is something wonderfully improbable, anachronistic and quixotic about "Chicken Run." Squatting down in the midst of Hollywood's high-tech, computer-generated summer, this delightfully handmade 80-minute Claymation feature about a veddy British...
I-Bonds, Cds: Amazing Rates
Q: I have the option of buying Series I Savings Bonds through payroll deduction. How do they differ from the old Series EE bonds? Mitch Katz, Arlington, Va. A: For the money you keep safe, I Bonds are a beaut. They currently pay 7.49 percent...
Let's Face the Music and Share, Mother Knows Best, A Bobo by Any Other Name., Sydney Gets Sporty
LET'S FACE THE MUSIC AND SHARE I'm a high-school freshman, and as my mother returned from the mailbox with the June 5 NEWSWEEK, I noticed an odd look on her face as she read out loud, "The War Over Napster" (Science & Technology). At that very...
Now, the Battle of the Briefs
Just when you thought you might get a breather from the hostilities between Microsoft and the Justice Department, tensions flared up again last week. In a flurry of legal filings, the two sides fought bitterly over the appeal process as both tried,...
Perspectives
"THIS IS NOT A VICTORY SPEECH." ENERGY SECRETARY BILL RICHARDSON, PROMISING TO CONTINUE INVESTIGATING THE MAY DISAPPEARANCE OF TWO HARD DRIVES FROM THE LOS ALAMOS, N.M., WEAPONS LAB, EVEN THOUGH THE CLASSIFIED INFORMATION MYSTERIOUSLY RE-EMERGED...
Prince Charming
Will's World: On the occasion of his 18th birthday, the world is getting a rare look at the man who was born to be the king of England. The shattered boy who marched bravely behind his mother's coffin three years ago has emerged a thoughtful young...
Red, White, Black and Blue
Benjamin Martin (Mel Gibson), the hero of Roland Emmerich's two-hour-and-40-minute American Revolution epic "The Patriot," was once a hero of the French and Indian Wars, but he's seen enough of fighting not to want to bloody his hands again. A widower...
Springsteen and the Blues, Tastes like Chicken, on the Hot Seat, Nudes in the News
Lots of rap acts, including Public Enemy, Mos Def and Rah Digga, have sung out about the Amadou Diallo shooting, but when working-class hero Bruce Springsteen tried it, some of his especially blue-collared fans felt betrayed. Two New York police groups...
SUVs: Fuel-Wasting Garbage Trucks?
I suppose we should be gloating a bit right now, those of us who don't drive sport utility vehicles. What with the rising cost of gasoline putting the squeeze on folks who tool about town in the reputedly bigger-is-better tanks, the current gas crunch...
Taking the Plunge
Given all the time and effort investors spend deciding which stocks to buy, they are neglecting an equally critical part of the equation: when to sell. Many investors are downright pre-adolescent about their portfolios. They fall in love with the winners...
The End of an Era?
On July 2, 40 million Mexicans will go to the polls to choose a new president. But this is not an ordinary election. For the first time in 71 years, there is a real chance that, in a free and fair contest, the candidate of the ruling Institutional...
The Putin Crackdown
In the days, not so long ago, when optimism about the new Russia abounded, Vladimir Gusinsky would be compared to William Randolph Hearst. If America at the turn of the century had its robber barons and flamboyant, politically powerful press lords,...
The Single Dad and King-to-Be
In retrospect, Prince Charles's transition from distant cad to loving dad was stunningly swift. Early family photos told a painful story: Charles, stiff and awkward with William and Harry; Diana, crouching, arms open wide to receive William, who ran...
Why Bill Has Become Microsoft's Mr. Rogers
Bill Gates has a new sideline: company pitchman. During breaks from Shaq's domination of the NBA finals last week, the smiling, sweater-clad Microsoft chairman popped up frequently in television commercials for the software giant. He reassured computer...
Will a Woman Ever Become President?
Power breakfasts are routine at the Waldorf-Astoria, but this one was special: a thousand women at a $125-a-seat fund-raiser for Hillary Rodham Clinton. The ballroom was packed: West Side matrons with fond memories of the Movement; twentysomething...