Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from April 23

7 Ways to Fix Air Travel: Fed Up with All the Hassles? Well, You're Not Alone. NEWSWEEK Asked the Best and the Brightest How to Make Flying Better
The busy summer travel season is not yet upon us, and already flying is the pits. It's only going to get worse: the number of people taking to the air in the United States may reach 1 billion a year over the next decade. To ease the pain, NEWSWEEK...
Acting Chops: Playing a Killer with a Few Bolts Loose, an Aussie Comic Explodes
Some roles you just can't turn down. But if Eric Bana was willing to play Mark (Chopper) Read, Australia's most notorious criminal, it's hard to imagine a role the actor wouldn't tackle. Jailed for a botched kidnapping, Chopper at one point in the...
American Beauty: The Famous Sheaths. the Soft Suits. the Silk Gowns. It's Back to the Couture as the Metropolitan Museum Shows off Jackie's Camelot Chic-And Evokes the Once and Future Icon
What would you wear to ride an elephant? In 1962, on a state visit to India, Jackie Kennedy climbed aboard such a beast wearing a pale yellow silk dress with little cap sleeves and a pair of white gloves. By the end of the '60s, the hippie revolution...
An Unpaid Tab in Florida: Bush Spent $8 Million, but Hasn't Settled with His Lawyers
Few lawyers did more to help George W. Bush become president than Barry Richard. As Bush's quarterback in the Florida courts during last fall's bruising recount, the white-maned Tallahassee, Fla., litigator became a familiar figure to TV audiences....
A Plane of One's Own: Frustrated with Regular Service, More Businesses Are Buying Shares in Private Jets-And Arriving on Time
Memo to the major airlines: you won't have David Brule to kick around anymore. Over the past 15 years, the president and CEO of Northern Star Industries, a snowplow maker based in Iron Mountain, Mich., had flown thousands of hours on the big carriers...
Are We Getting Smarter: IQ Scores Rose Steadily in the 20th Century. as Scientists Search for the Reasons, They Are Shedding New Light on the Dance between Genes and Life Experience That Determines Intelligence
1. The cops have put Tony, Uncle Junior, Silvio, Paulie Walnuts and Livia in a lineup, standing in spots numbered 1 through 6 from left to right. There's one empty space. Livia is the third person from the left. Tony is to Uncle Junior's immediate...
A True Maverick: Billionaire Mark Cuban Is Taking His Rival NBA Owners to School-And He's Making It Look Easy
Were it not for Michael Jordan's partial stake in the Washington Wizards, there would be no doubt about it: Mark Cuban has the best jump shot of any owner in the NBA. It's three hours before the opening tip of tonight's Mavericks game at Reunion Arena...
Cyberscope
HOT PROPERTY How Much Is That Shelby? Cyberpets have some advantages over real animals: they "eat" but they don't mess the carpet, they're hairless and they have a convenient "off" switch. Which one is right for you? We compared four interactive...
Focus on Your Health
FATHERHOOD Diminished Sperm Men may revel in their lifelong ability to father children, but the biological clock doesn't tick for women alone. It's well known that as aging sperm cells replicate within a man's body, they can generate mutations that...
Hits until the End of Time: In Death, Tupac Is Still One of Rap's Biggest Stars
Tupac Shakur was a huge basketball fan--he even portrayed a wanna-be ''baller'' in the 1993 film "Above the Rim." But the rapper had never been to a professional basketball game before Suge Knight took him to one in 1996, shortly after Shakur signed...
Is Argentina A Time Bomb? Its Debt Problems Could Trigger a New Financial Crisis and Deepen the Global Economic Slump
The great danger of any economic slowdown is that it feeds on itself. We already see signs of this in the United States. Weaker consumer spending and business investment hurt corporate profits, depressing stock prices and confidence, which then harm...
Leg Waxing and Life Everlasting: Hair Plugs, Collagen, Botox, Trainers: How Did Self-Maintenance Become a Service Industry?
My mother did not exfoliate. In her medicine cabinet she had a big white jar of Pond's cold cream and a big blue jar of Noxzema. That's as much care and feeding as her face ever got. As for my grandmothers, the one with skin like tissue paper and the...
Lonely Deaths in an Unforgiving Sea: When a Boat Fishing for Sole Went Down in the Arctic, It Took 15 Lives with It. the Men Who Work the Ocean
At sea in Alaska waters, Kerry Egan, the captain's mate on the Arctic Rose fishing vessel, sent an e-mail to his brother, Doug, back home in Minnesota. "Everything here is like a bruise--gray and swelling--typical Bering Sea," he wrote. "Talk to you...
Mail Call
A Show With Hits and Misses Many readers responding to our April 2 cover story on "The Sopranos" told us they find the show offensive, primarily because of its violent themes. Others objected to its profanity and depiction of Italian-Americans as...
MORE WALLET THAN WILL: The Bush Budget Reflects a President Searching for the Courage of His Compassion
We're beginning to get a sense of what the phrase "compassionate conservative" really means. It's when you talk like Jimmy Carter and govern like Ronald Reagan. Consider a relatively small but telling example: President Bush and Boys and Girls Clubs...
Newsmakers
All Hail the Queen Talk about R-E-S-P-E-C-T. They still called it "Divas Live," but there was little high-maintenance behavior at the annual VH1 show, which saluted one of showbiz's biggest: Aretha Franklin. No reported snippiness (Mariah Carey,...
Nourishing Your Brain: It's No Secret That the Fats in Fish and Walnuts Are Good for Your Heart. New Research Suggests They May Also Ward off Depression and Mental Maladies
Psychiatrist Andrew Stoll has seen plenty of patients with bipolar disorder, but few more serious than a middle-aged man he calls "X." Patient X suffered his first episode of mania in Rome, where he became so delusional that he landed first in jail...
Periscope
PROTEST Raising Some Heck in Quebec Thousands of anti-globalization protesters are expected to show up this week in Quebec as heads of state from 34 nations arrive to discuss a hemispheric free-trade zone. This time, having learned from the "Battle...
Prescription Drugs at Bargain Prices: With a Little Effort, You Can Cut the Cost of Your Medications without Compromising Your Health
Marilyn Taylor had a secret weapon in her personal drug war. Faced with huge bills and the loss of insurance, the 62-year-old Manchester, Maine, woman simply quit most of the medications she needed for her asthma, arthritis, depression and high blood...
Suge Knight Is Back in Business: EXCLUSIVE: About to Be Sprung from Prison, Rap Impresario Suge Knight Talks about His Controversial Past-And Looks Ahead to Life as a Free Man
For nearly five years, Marion (Suge) Knight, the multimillionaire impresario of gangsta rap, has been sitting behind bars in a California prison, dreaming of Death Row. In a matter of days, his time will be up. "The first thing that I'm gonna do when...
The Conflict to Come: War of Words: The Crew Is Home Safe, but America May Soon Be Facing a New Era of Confrontation with China
On the military transport plane bringing the 24 crew members home, the in-flight movie--"Men of Honor"--was just a preview of coming attractions. The crew, released after 11 days in captivity by the Chinese, were embraced as national heroes. At a press...
These Days, Growing Up Is Hard to Do: The Anything-Goes Youth Culture of My Dot-Com Made Me Long for the Days of Power Suits
When I joined the Internet gold rush in 1999, e-commerce was on its way to making malls as passe as ancient Greek agoras. Wireless business solutions were hailed as the keys to achieving the paperless office. And dot-coms were making their stockholders...
The View from the Top: Continental CEO Gordon Bethune Talks Straight about Delays, the FAA and the Best Meals in Coach
Airlines are an industry that people love to hate. The big companies tend to get blamed for just about everything that goes wrong, even when it's not at fault. To get a CEO's perspective, NEWSWEEK's Adam Bryant caught up with Gordon Bethune, the chief...
Tough Guys Can Say 'I'm Sorry': Now That Conservatives Are in Charge, Let's Hope They Can Adopt a Responsible China Policy
Amid the nationwide celebration for the returning crew and the happy consensus that America prevailed in the Hainan crisis, a few voices on the right have been asking, "Did we really win?" Conservative commentators William Kristol and Robert Kagan...
Try Lounging in Leather: The Start-Up JetBlue's Giving the Major Carriers Stiff Competition with Classy Service and Cheap Seats
It's the end of a busy workday, and the 4:45 p.m. flight from Rochester, N.Y., to New York City is crammed with weary business travelers. But this is no cattle car in the sky. Passengers relax in wide leather seats and channel-surf on live satellite...
Why Flying Is Hell: Clogged Runways. Long Lines. Endless Delays. Canceled Flights. from Airlines and Passengers to Airports and the Fed, There's Plenty of Blame to Go around. It's Time to Get Past the Finger-Pointing and Look for Real Solutions
It was supposed to be a quick trip. Sean Epstein, a 27-year-old marketing executive in New York, had to fly down to Washington in January for a morning training session with a client. Even though the flight is measured in minutes, he decided to leave...
W's Green War: His Early Moves Left Him Open to Attack, but Bush Is Planning a Pro-Enviro Push
As George W. Bush's political right hand, Karl Rove likes challenges. He guided Bush to the Texas governorship and to the White House, and wrote the new president's legislative game plan. So it was no surprise that Rove took on a crucial task last...