Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from September 13

America, Unchanged: It's Hard to Imagine Ever Caring Again about Trivial or Pedestrian Concerns. but Here's Why We Should Try
Byline: Jonathan Alter Summer is over in America. Fat and happy is history, a closed chapter in our national experience. By midday Tuesday, with the surreal horror sinking in, the sense spread widely that life in the United States will change as...
A New Date of Infamy: In the Skies and across the Nation, the Worst Terrorist Strike in U.S. History Is a Story of Horror, Heroes and the Resolve Not to Give in to Killers
Byline: Evan Thomas Jeremy Glick knew that he was probably doomed. The hijackers had told the 45 passengers and crew of United Airlines Flight 93, bound from Newark to San Francisco, that they planned to blow up the plane. But Glick, a salesman...
A President Faces the Test of a Lifetime: When the News Broke, the Secret Service Moved Bush Deep into the Interior, but by Nightfall He'd Returned to His Besieged Capital. the Journey Ahead of Him-To Reassure the Nation and Respond to an Act of War-Will Be Long and Difficult, Too
Byline: Howard Fineman The safest place, they told the president, was in the air. The Secret Service insisted that George W. Bush flee west from Florida, away from the chaos and carnage of New York and Washington. There were, his top political aide,...
'I Saw Things No One Should Ever See': These Are Dispatches from the Front. Schoolteachers and Firefighters, Parents and Police, Trauma Surgeons and Tourists-They All Struggled to Explain the Inexplicable. Here Are Their Voices
Byline: With Arian Campo-Flores, Devin Gordon, Katherine Stroup, N'Gai Croal, Babak Dehghanpisheh, John Ness, Keith Naughton, Joan Raymond, Tara Weingarten, Adam Piore, Franco Ordonez, Mary Carmichael, Julie Scelfo and Gretel Kovach The first blast...
The Toll on Our Psyche: By Striking at the Icons of America's Military Might and Economic Strength, the Terrorists Aimed to Deeply Shake the Way the Nation Thinks of Itself
Byline: Sharon Begley It was surely no accident that the terrorists struck at the symbols of America's military might and economic strength. Where the Pentagon stood intact and seemingly impregnable just seconds before, where the Twin Towers of...
The War on Terror Goes Global: America Alone Cannot Triumph in the Fight against Terrorism. It Needs the Help of Freedom-Loving Nations Everywhere. This Is Their Struggle, Too
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001, will indeed be a "date which will live in infamy," as Franklin Roosevelt said almost 60 years ago, after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. But the analogy ends there. Last Tuesday's events are even more...
'We've Hit the Targets': That Message, Allegedly Sent by Osama Bin Laden's Men, Makes Him Suspect No. 1. Can He Be Stopped at Last?
Byline: Michael Hirsh At the time it seemed an empty boast, if a chilling one. On Feb. 7, 1995, Ramzi Yousef, considered the mastermind of the 1993 World Trade Center bombing, was being escorted in shackles back to New York City. The FBI had just...