Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from October 7

Advice: 'It's Hard for Parents to Understand': In a New Book, Dr. Harold Koplewicz Helps Families Sort out Normal Adolescent Irritability from Real Illness
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz As the founder and director of the New York University Child Study Center, Dr. Harold Koplewicz has seen firsthand the pain that depression brings to families. His new book, "More Than Moody: Recognizing and Treating Adolescent...
All the News That's Fit to Merge
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts Surely there's an easier way to make money. But execs at Disney and AOL Time Warner appear determined to go the hard route, and have fixated yet again on their long-running interest in merging their respective news-gathering...
Al Qaeda's Man in Iraq? U.S. Intelligence Officials May Have Traced a Key Osama Bin Laden Operative to Saddam Hussein's Home Base
Byline: Michael Isikoff and Daniel Klaidman In the weeks after the September 11 attacks, security officials around the world were on highest alert. So when a 37-year-old Iraqi national named Ahmad Hikmat Shakir stepped off a plane in Amman's Queen...
A Question of Anti-Semitism
Byline: Jonathan Alter Dick Armey, the retiring house majority leader, told a Florida audience last week that he sees "two Jewish communities" in America--smart conservative Jews in the sciences, and dumb liberal Jews in the arts. I don't know how...
A Worry for Ravers: One Night of Ecstasy Could Cause Brain Damage
Byline: Mary Carmichael Seven years ago Johns Hopkins neurologist George Ricaurte started a major battle in the war on drugs with a single image--a monkey brain on MDMA, the active ingredient in the drug ecstasy. The brain was shot through with...
Back on His Feet: September 11 Nearly Claimed Sal Iacono's Shoe-Repair Shop as Another Casualty. How One Small Business in the Shadow of the World Trade Center Dug out of the Hole
Byline: Steven Brill At 7 a.m. on the first Monday after the September 11 attacks, the police allowed Sal Iacono through a barricade so he could get back into Continental Shoe Repair, the shop he has owned for 25 years, about two blocks from the...
Baghdad and Battling Pols
Byline: Anna Quindlen In the last analysis, the war is all about them. They won't go and fight, of course, although some of them may don camouflage or hark back to their service records or make appearances before cheering crowds of soldiers. But...
Facing Up to Smallpox
Byline: Mary Carmichael The writers of "ER" have always tried to be topical, but even they couldn't have expected their art to imitate life as eerily as it did last week. The show's season premiere, which revolved around a suspected smallpox outbreak,...
Filling in the Gap: Can a Disney Veteran Fix the Troubled Retail Chain?
Byline: Brad Stone Liz Franklin was once a loyal Gap shopper. The 25-year-old, who works in human resources in Chicago, stuffed her closets during high school and college with Gap black pants, ribbed turtlenecks and pocket T's. "I got all my basics...
Five Easy Pieces
Byline: Jenny Rubinfeld Pack up those peasant blouses and prairie skirts. This season's fashions are straighter and sexier than summer's flouncy boho looks, says Tip Sheet style expert Jenny Rubinfeld. Here are five pieces that will get your wardrobe...
Gore as You've Never Heard Him
Byline: Fareed Zakaria In the end most Democrats will support the president on Iraq. But they will get there kicking and screaming, reminding the public of their internal conflicts and ambivalence about the use of American power abroad. Perhaps...
Hostile Work Environment: Typing, Filing, Bondage: This 'Secretary' Aims to Please
Byline: David Ansen A feel-good movie about sadomasochism, the seriocomic "Secretary" manages to be simultaneously subversive and sweet. This is no mean feat. Using a Mary Gaitskill story as a jumping-off point, director Steven Shainberg and writer...
I'm a Conservative, but I'm Not a Hatemonger: In a Culture That Supposedly Values Diversity, I'm Called Names Simply for Expressing My Opinions
Byline: Todd Werkhoven I am a sexist. a racist. a homophobe. A zealot. It's enough to make me hate myself. And I would if I believed it. But these labels do not really describe me--they are names I've been called because I'm religious and conservative....
'I Yelled at Them to Stop': U.S. Special Forces Are Frustrated. Kicking Down Doors and Frisking Women, They Say, Is No Way to Win Hearts and Minds in Afghanistan. A Report from the Front
Byline: Colin Soloway One afternoon in August, a U.S. Special Forces A team knocked at the door of a half-ruined mud com- pound in the Shahikot Valley. The servicemen were taking part in Operation Mountain Sweep, a weeklong hunt for Qaeda and Taliban...
Look Who's Talking: Douglas Faneuil, Once a Lowly Stockbroker's Assistant, Is Martha Stewart's Latest Headache
Byline: Jerry Adler He might have been just a $50,000-a-year assistant at Merrill Lynch. But dress him in a coral-pink silk shirt and royal-blue blazer by Fendi, and in the pages of W magazine he's "Banker Douglas Faneuil," curly-haired and baby-faced...
Mail Call: Creating an Enemy in the Middle East
As the discord over Iraq has become louder and more divisive in Washington, our readers have expressed their own impassioned views about the country and our Sept. 23 cover story, "How We Helped Create Saddam... And Can We Fix Iraq After He's Gone?"...
Mideast: Playing Both Sides
Byline: Dan Ephron Ariel Sharon insists his siege against Yasir Arafat's Ramallah headquarters is aimed not at Arafat but at the men he is sheltering. He singles out Tawfiq Tirawi, the head of Palestinian General Intelligence, who, according to...
Newsmakers: Eggers Goes It Alone
Byline: Malcolm Jones, Tara Weingarten Dave Eggers's debut memoir, "A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius," sat on the best-seller list for 14 weeks and made him a celebrity. But something about the experience riled him, because he fired his...
On Campus: The Doctors Are 'In': College Therapists Say They're Seeing More Kids Asking for Help. but They Worry Most about the Ones They Can't Reach
Byline: Julie Scelfo Rhonda Venable's first appointment last Monday was with a severely depressed sophomore who's worried he's too promiscuous. After the session, Venable, associate director of Vanderbilt University's counseling center, met with...
'Original' 'Humor'
Byline: --Seth Mnookin In the 23 years since it began as a diner-rated guide of New York City restaurants (Starbucks patrons laud its "damn good" "high-octane" java), the Zagat guides have come close to world domination. Today, Zagat rates restaurants...
Perspectives
"This is the guy that tried to kill my dad." President George W. Bush, on Iraqi President Saddam Hussein "If we as a group were black or gay, we would not be victimized or picked upon." An unnamed farmer, quoted and endorsed by Prince Charles,...
Planes, Trains and Politicians
Byline: Allan Sloan OK, it's time for a pop quiz. The subject is transportation. Ready? Here goes. What two things do Amtrak and the airline industry have in common? The first one's easy: both of them are running around Washington looking for federal...
Playing by Her Own Rules: She's Smart. She's Sexy. She's Taken. Thanks to a New Season of 'The West Wing' and a Role in 'Red Dragon,' This Moment Belongs to Mary-Louise Parker
Byline: Devin Gordon When you think about it, three years is a really, really long time to go without sex. "The West Wing," NBC's romance-starved White House saga, has won three straight Emmys for best drama series, so it seems to be managing just...
Recovery or Recession?
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson We are at a loss for words. If nothing else, this baffling economy has defeated the vocabulary of economics. We are supposed to be in a "recovery," but it doesn't feel like one. The stock market is down 26 percent this...
Review: A Fresh Meal for Dr. L: 'Hannibal' Let the Grisly Gastronome out of Jail. Bad Idea. in 'Red Dragon,' He Loses His Freedom-And Gets His Bite Back
Byline: David Ansen and John Horn You knew when you first saw Anthony Hopkins as Hannibal Lecter in "The Silence of the Lambs" that this screen fiend was one for the ages, a creation as indelible in his way as Bela Lugosi's Dracula. You knew as...
Rusty Yates Moves On
Byline: --Anne Belli Gesalman Attorneys for Andrea Yates, the Houston woman who drowned her five children, can now proceed with her appeal. An anonymous donor last week agreed to pay the roughly $50,000 cost of preparing a transcript of her trial--the...
Taking Jeb to School: Democrat Bill McBride Is a Vietnam Vet with an Education Plan-Making Him a Treacherous Foe for the First Brother
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores You'd think that in his quest to rally the nation for a war against Iraq, President George W. Bush could count on his loyal little brother Jeb for a helping hand. Not this time. As Jeb campaigns for a second term as Florida's...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: --Mark Whitaker Teenagers are moody. They like to keep their bedroom doors shut. They often don't want to talk at the family dinner table. They can take temporary setbacks very hard. And all that's normal--even healthy. After all, they're...
Tribulations at the Trib: Now It's Bob Greene's Old Employer That's Being Questioned about the Columnist's Scandalous Downfall
Publisher correction: Nov 13 2002 Our Oct. 7 story about columnist Bob Greene ("Tribulations at the Trib") included a photograph of NBC reporter Andrea Mitchell and her husband, Federal Reserve chairman Alan Greenspan, with a caption that said she had...
Umps Call Foul: Baseball Is Using Advanced Electronics to Second-Guess Its Umpires. Guess Who's Not Happy about It
Byline: Mark Starr On the mound at Fenway Park, Red Sox pitcher Tim Wakefield winds up and sends a 68mph knuckleball fluttering toward home plate. Just as the ball reaches the plate, it makes a sudden downward plunge before disappearing into the...
Wag the War: Bush Hopes Talk of Iraq Will Help the GOP Reverse the Tides of History. but on the Ground, the Fight Is as Much about Financial Jitters and the Country's Changing Contours
Byline: Howard Fineman It's only a slight exaggeration to say that this fall's election season is all about the hopes and the fears of Elizabeth Godinez, who is taking a lunch-time break on a shaded bench near a Florentine fountain in The Village...
Will the Torch Go out? Robert Torricelli Helped Build the Democrats' Senate Majority. His Ethics Woes Threaten to Make Them a Minority Again
Byline: T. Trent Gegax and Mark Hosenball New Jersey Sen. Robert Torricelli has had his share of bad weeks since being "severely admonished" in July by the Senate Ethics Committee for accepting a TV and jewelry from David Chang, a campaign donor....
Young and Depressed: Ten Years Ago This Disease Was for Adults Only. but as Teen Depression Comes out of the Closet, It's Getting Easier to Spot-And Sufferers Can Hope for a Brighter Future
Byline: Pat Wingert and Barbara Kantrowitz Brianne Camilleri had it all: two involved parents, a caring older brother and a comfortable home near Boston. But that didn't stop the overwhelming sense of hopelessness that enveloped her in ninth grade....