Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 26

Al Qaeda Strikes Again: New Suicide Terror Attacks in Riyadh and Casablanca Show That Al Qaeda Is Still Very Dangerous, and Adapting to Survive. Could It Be Gearing Up to Strike Inside America Next?
Byline: Mark Hosenball and Michael Isikoff It isn't easy to rattle Adel al-Jubeir, the suave, impeccably tailored spokesman for the Saudi government. Nicknamed the "Sultan of Spin," he had adeptly deflected U.S. concerns that Saudi Arabia wasn't...
An Erosion of Trust: The Times Scandal Has Only Heightened Public Cynicism about the Press. Why We're All Poorer for It
Byline: Jonathan Alter For journalists, one of the most depressing dimensions of the Jayson Blair fiasco is this: why didn't more of the subjects of his dozens of bogus stories in The New York Times complain about the phony details and concocted...
Baseball: The Beginning of the End
Byline: Bret Begun, Brian Braiker and Daniel I. Dorfman Pitcher Warren Spahn once said that hitting is timing, and that pitching is upsetting timing. Roger Clemens has upset a lot of hitters in his career and will soon win his 300th game--a milestone...
Building for the Worst
Byline: Holly Bailey Lightning may not strike twice, but as residents of Moore, Okla., recently discovered, tornadoes do. After more than half the town was destroyed by a May 1999 twister, the Oklahoma City suburb was cleaning up again after a tornado...
Finally, the FBI Uncovers a Tantalizing Clue
Byline: Daniel Klaidman and Michael Isikoff After months of frustration, FBI investigators have stumbled on a new theory of the 2001 anthrax attacks that some sleuths hoped could crack the case. Earlier this year, acting on a tip, FBI divers recovered...
Here's the Pitch: Who Dreams Up Reality Shows like 'American Idol'-And Do the Networks Ever Say No? Inside a Meeting at NBC
Byline: B. J. Sigesmund Ever since reality TV broke big, network executives have opened their office doors to a parade of producers, who come bearing ideas good, bad and very, very ugly. NEWSWEEK asked NBC's Jeff Gaspin if we could sit in on a day's...
High Noon for 'Diversity'
Byline: George F. Will The late Justice William Brennan reportedly said that the most important word in the Supreme Court is not "justice" or "equality" or "law" but "five." Soon the Supreme Court, and perhaps Justice Sandra Day O'Connor as the...
'Idol' Worship: So Who's It Going to Be: Clay or Ruben? Thirty Million People Can't Stand the Suspense. Inside 'American Idol,' TV's Most Addictive Show
Byline: Marc Peyser and Sean M. Smith Simon Cowell never lets you see him sweat, but at the moment he's looking a little damp. It's Tuesday afternoon, hours before the "American Idol" semifinal, and the last rehearsal is just beginning. Paula Abdul...
My Turn: David's Death Doesn't Have to Be in Vain: I Want Schools to Educate Families about Depression So That No Other Parents Get the Phone Call We Did
Byline: Inez Okrent I would like to tell you a little about our son David. Eight years ago, we sent him off to college--Harvard, to be exact. Three years later he came back in a coffin, a victim of suicide. It was a shocking, violent, unspeakable...
Newsmakers
Byline: Dana Thomas Who Will Bite for 'Dogville'? Sure, it's Nicole Kidman's year. But that may not be enough to save Lars von Trier's "Dogville" from the dogs. The avant-garde Danish filmmaker ("Breaking the Waves") had yet to find a U.S. distributor...
Now, Saudis See the Enemy: For Decades, Supporting Islamic Extremism Has Been Cost-Free for the Saudis-Government and People Alike. Not Anymore
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Last week's attacks in Saudi Arabia and Morocco show two contradictory things about Al Qaeda. It remains strong enough to launch serious operations. Yet since September 11, 2001, it has not been able to hit a single military,...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom: New York Times, Reuters, E! Online, New York Observer, The Washington Post (2), Reuters, Los Angeles Times, ESPN, The Washington Post "The attacks have all the fingerprints of Al Qaeda." Secretary of...
Race in the Newsroom: Yes, It Was a Factor in the Blair Mess. but to Blame Affirmative Action for His Fall Is to Deny Larger Truths
Byline: Ellis Cose How could The New York Times have been so stupid? How could it have let a twenty something chronic screw-up wreak havoc on its credibility? For Washington Post columnist Richard Cohen, the answer is glaringly clear: "favoritism...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker A week ago, the New York Times published an extraordinary 7,165-word piece detailing the trail of plagiarism and deceit left by reporter Jayson Blair--a fiasco that the nation's most prestigious newspaper described as a "low-point...
The Street's Latest Lure: Someone Is Going to Mint Money with the New Hedge Funds for Smaller Investors. but I Have a Funny Feeling That It Won't Be You and Me
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn Hedge funds for the masses? Uh-oh. Until recently, these investments were strictly a hide-out for rich folk and institutions, such as college endowments and pension funds. Minimum investments ran to $1 million and up. But...
Times Bomb: An Ambitious Reporter with a Troubled Relationship to the Truth Meets an Aggressive Editor Eager to Mint New Stars. Inside Journalism's Perfect Storm. A NEWSWEEK Exclusive
Byline: Seth Mnookin The executive editor of the New York Times, Howell Raines, was walking down the street in Times Square, preparing for one of the most difficult meetings of his life. It was Wednesday, May 14, and Raines, Arthur Sulzberger Jr.,...
Vacation Digs: Whether You're Planning a Relaxing, Romantic Escape-Or a Retreat Crammed with Guests and Kids-Here's How to Make Your Vacation Home, Well, Homier
1. Vegetable citronella candles Marshall Fields Keep mosquitoes at bay with an early harvest of these veggie-shape candles. The full set--artichokes, carrots, tomatoes, eggplants, asparagus--is $35.95 at marshallfields.com. 2. Bocce balls Restoration...
Weight of the World: The United Nations Spent the War on the Sidelines, Sent There by a Bush Administration Contemptuous of Its Clout. Can Kofi Annan Make It Relevant Again?
Byline: Melinda Henneberger Kofi Annan stepped in front of the TV cameras outside his Athens hotel suite looking spent and surprisingly shaky. Normally known for his cool, the U.N. secretary-general is an opaque but reassuring presence with no visible...
Who's in Charge Here? the First American Team Leading Iraq Was Plagued by Inexperience, Bureaucratic Infighting and Inertia
Byline: Joshua Hammer and Colin Soloway An air of somnolence hung over Saddam Hussein's former Republican Palace along the Tigris River. In the sweltering streets outside the gates, desperate Iraqis lined up for meager rations of gasoline, armed...
Will the Bosses Pay? the Blair Affair Hurts the Times's Business. Standard Corporate Punishment Calls for a Compensation Hit
Byline: Allan Sloan The Jayson Blair story has been viewed through lots of lenses: journalism, ideology and race, among others. But here's one that's been largely overlooked: the Wall Street lens. After all, The New York Times isn't just one of...
Women's Sports: Beyond a League of Their Own
Byline: Mark Starr It's a critical moment in the "battle of the sexes." When Annika Sorenstam tees off at the Colonial in Ft. Worth, Texas, she'll become the first woman to challenge the male elite at a PGA Tour event since 1945. But her crossover...