Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from September 22

A Case of Big Greed at the Big Board: Our Wall Street Editor's Take on Dick Grasso's Payday
Byline: Allan Sloan For years, Dick Grasso, chairman of the New York Stock Exchange, has been the Michael Jordan of business. DG and MJ have two of the most famous bald pates in the world, they're both terrific showmen and they both deliver at crunch...
Afternoon Delights
Byline: Kattia Corrales, R.D., L.D.N., and Christopher Duggan, M.D., M.P.H. Should kids eat snacks? Absolutely. Though excessive noshing is a well-known health hazard, children can benefit from two or three well-planned snacks each day. The key...
Al-Jazeera: Too Close to Terrorists?
Byline: Michael Isikoff and Eric Pape How does Al-Jazeera keep getting scoops like last week's Osama bin Laden video? Editors at the Qatar-based Arab TV network won't say. "If I told you we received the tape bye-mail, then they'd start tapping all...
Antibiotics: Handle Them with Care: After Decades of Increase, New Studies Are Showing That the Rate of Antibiotic Use for Children Has Now Started to Decline
Byline: Jonathan Finkelstein, M.D., M.P.H., and Grace Lee, M.D., M.P.H. Antibiotics really are wonder drugs--they have saved countless children's lives over the past century. But many of these medicines are now losing their punch, as disease-causing...
Arafat in the Cross Hairs: A New Threat from Israel Only Strengthens the Palestinian Leader. So What Now?
Byline: Joshua Hammer Yasir Arafat has an unnerving way of turning every defeat--for himself or his people--into a political victory. Last week, after a pair of Hamas suicide bombings in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem had killed 15 Israelis in five hours,...
Courthouse Rock: Last Week the Recording Industry Sued 261 Unlucky Music Lovers, Who, like Millions More, Had Used Internet File-Sharing Services to Download Tunes. Will the Radical Strategy Work? and Is It Fair?
Byline: Steven Levy Joyce Mullen's new car has a CD player, so this year the 53-year-old administrative assistant for Lucent began purchasing discs, most recently a Cher collection. But her relationship with the music industry changed last Monday,...
Cut out for Greatness: Romare Bearden Poured into His Art the Life around Him and the Ideas within Him. A Master African-American Artist, Sure. A Master, Period? No Doubt
Byline: Peter Plagens African-American modern artists have long been caught between the proverbial rock and a hard place. If they stick to what any artist knows best--his or her own life, community and experience--then they're ghettoized as specialist...
Don't Rush to Disaster: It Is Touching to Learn of French Faith in the Iraqi Governing Council. When the Council Was Set Up, the French Refused to Endorse It
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Finally everyone seems to agree on Iraq. The French and German governments have proposed that Iraq should be handed back to Iraqis as soon as possible. The Governing Council should become the government of Iraq and elections...
FAQ: Are You Next? What You Need to Know about Sharing
Byline: Steven Levy Now that the recording industry is hauling people into court for trading in copyrighted files, parents have taken a sudden interest in the technicalities and legalities of file sharing. Here's a brief primer to help clear up...
Fighting for Air: Asthma Is a Crisis for the Nation's Kids
Byline: Dirk Johnson It's been a while since Zeron Moody, 7, gasped for air so desperately he ended up in a hospital. Still, when his friends run down the basketball court, Zeron falls behind. "I stop," says the Chicago second grader almost apologetically,...
Helping Kids Get Fit: Communities Are Finding New Ways for Youngsters to Trim Down and Tone Up
Byline: Peg Tyre and Julie Scelfo If doctors announced that nearly a fifth of our nation's children were exhibiting signs of, say, typhoid, there'd be panic on Main Street. But for the past 10 years, public-health officials have been warning of...
Hey, God, It's Me, Joan: 'Joan of Arcadia' Offers a Two-for-One Deal: A Clever Teen Soap and a Cop Drama. Can CBS Take One Back?
Byline: Devin Gordon CBS's spiritually inclined new show "Joan of Arcadia" ponders the same theological conundrum raised by the noted pop philosopher Joan Osborne in her 1995 hit song "What If God Was One of Us?" Osborne's tune is the theme music...
Immunizations: The Best Medicine
Byline: Henry H. Bernstein, D.O. Mass immunization may be the greatest medical achievement of all time. At the start of the 20th century, only half the children born in United States survived to the age of 5. Today, thanks to immunization, the diseases...
Kids and Depression: Living beyond Sadness
Byline: William R. Beardslee, M.D., and Stuart Goldman, M.D. Growing up is never easy, but for some children it becomes more a burden than a challenge. The stresses of life push these kids into a zone beyond unhappiness, where life becomes overwhelming...
Love Is Dangerous: An Affair, a Scandal, a Shocking New Thriller. Meg Ryan, America's Former Sweetheart, Tells All
Byline: Sean Smith She is not broken. She's not ashamed or bitter or interested in our forgiveness. It has been two years since the end of the affair, the public flogging, the divorce, the failure of two of her movies. She's now 41 and not the woman...
New Options for ADHD
Publisher correction: 19 Nov 2003 In a recent list of medications for ADHD ("Tailoring the Treatment," Sept. 22), we noted that some can be "crushed or split," while others should be taken whole. Metadate CD, Ritalin LA and Adderall XR can be opened...
Newsmakers
Byline: Dana Thomas, Brad Stone An Oscar--By Special Delivery When Harrison Ford accepted the best-director Oscar on behalf of Roman Polanski at the Academy Awards in L.A. last March, he promised he'd deliver it in person to the director of "The...
Out of Tune: Picking on Little Kids and Old Ladies? What Were the Record Companies Thinking? They Say It's Life or Death
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts The threat of a PR disaster was huge. What if, perhaps, they caught a handicapped, homebound downloader who found joy only through free file sharing--someone who would generate a lot of sympathy? Senior executives from...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom: Fox News (2), Slate, Detroit Free Press, Globe and Mail, Associated Press, Boston Herald, Boston Globe, Reuters, Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, N.Y.), Associated Press, The Sun "To Jerusalem we are...
Taking Arnold to School: The GOP Hopeful Crams for His First Big Political Test
Byline: Karen Breslau It took Arnold Schwarzenegger years to earn his bachelor's degree. He took junior college classes, enrolled in correspondence courses and eventually cobbled together enough credits for a diploma in 1980, at the age of 32. Twenty-three...
Technology: Office Space, the Sequel
Byline: Peter Suciu These days more of us are working at home--but few of us spend enough time thinking about how to set up shop. We're tucking desktop computers under kitchen tables, plopping printers on folding chairs and stuffing cable modems...
The Allergy Epidemic: We've Conquered Most Childhood Infections, but Extreme Reactions to Everyday Substances Pose a New Threat
Byline: Jerry Adler The first indication that something was not quite right with David Adams was subtle, a mild rash around his mouth after nursing. Luckily, the second clue, at the age of 3 months, was not so subtle: angry hives that erupted over...
The Artists: It's the Music, Stupid: The Industry Has a Much Bigger Problem Than File Sharing
Byline: Lorraine Ali The music industry can sue every middle-schooler from Poughkeepsie to Palo Alto, but record labels will not cure their woes if they continue to churn out cut-rate albums at top-rate prices. For the past five years, they've been...
The Creaky Job Machine: The Economy Sees to Be Improving, and We're More Productive. but the Statistics Hide an Ugly, Grinding Process That May Lead to More Cuts
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson If you're wondering what happened to the "great American job machine," so is everyone else. Since February 2001, private employment has fallen by 3.3 million, says the Labor Department. Jared Bernstein of the Economic...
The Disease Is Silent. We Don't Have to Be. Far Too Often, Women with Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer Don't Get the Tests That Could Save Their Lives
CORRECTION PUBLISHED 9/30/03: In the Sept. 22 My Turn, "The Disease Is Silent. We Don't Have to Be," we incorrectly stated that a Pap smear is a test for uterine cancer. The Pap smear primarily detects cervical cancer, and is not a test for uterine...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker Dad, do you think the terrorists will strike again?" My daughter has asked me that question a dozen times since 9/11, and although I try to reassure her, I know I can't rule it out. And I could see it was on her mind again...
The Girls Are Back in Town: Four Years Ago, Mia, Brandi and the Rest of the Team Thrilled America by Winning the Women's World Cup. Most Are Returning-But a Repeat Won't Be Easy
Byline: Mark Starr Nobody forgets that one special summer fling. For American sports fans, it came four years ago when they fell head over heels for a band of fresh-faced young women who, in a few weeks, transformed themselves from soccer unknowns...
The Lebanon Scenario: Anonymous Car Bombs, Political Kidnappings, Ethnic Militias. the Iraqi Battleground Has Echoes of an Earlier Occupation
Byline: Rod Nordland Iraq under occupation is starting to look uncomfortably similar to Lebanon during its long civil war. The central government exists only in name, and neither police nor occupying troops are able to keep the peace. In response,...
The Man in Black: He Was a 'Walking Contradiction' Who Craved the Simplicity He Embodied
Byline: David Gates, Malcolm Jones, David Ansen JOHNNY CASH, 71 After a couple of pages of family history--the old Scottish name was Caesche--he began telling the story of his life with characteristic plainspokenness. "My name is John R. Cash,"...
The Wages of Sin: The Archbishop of Boston Gets His $85 Million Deal Done
Byline: Mark Miller Facing a crowd of reporters, Gary Bergeron stood in a park outside a Boston courthouse and said the words he had fought so long to say. "From this day forward in the eyes of you people, in the eyes of the church, I am not an...
Troubled Souls: Mental Illnesses Are So Complex in Children That Health-Care Professionals Can't Always Detect Them
Byline: Claudia Kalb Tyler Whitley, 7, is 4 feet 4 inches and weighs 75 pounds. He has blond hair, blue eyes, a generous spirit--and bipolar disorder, a serious mental illness. Highly irritable and angry one minute, he'll be laughing hysterically...
Twins beneath the Skin: The Two Guys Who Make Up the Quirky Hip-Hop Unit Outkast Couldn't Be More Different-And on Their New Album, Each One Gets His Own Disc. Can This Marriage Be Saved?
Byline: Allison Samuels Andre Benjamin--you know him as Andre 3000, of the rap duo Outkast--is in daddy mode today. He and his 5-year-old son, Seven (so named because it's a divine and indivisible number), are just back from the Magic Mountain amusement...
We Are Here for Andrea: It Could Be a Day on Which Every American Answers the Question That United So Many on the First September 11: How Can I Help?
Byline: Anna Quindlen A motley collection of items have wound up on the bulletin board in the past year. There was a list of phone numbers for one kid's college, and now there is a list of phone numbers for another's. There are slips of paper with...
When Safety Is the Name of the Game: Every Year, Millions of Young Athletes End Up in the Hospital. What Parents and Kids Can Do to Prevent Sports Injuries
Byline: David Noonan Fish gotta swim, birds gotta fly, kids gotta play. And that's what they do. Each year, an estimated 30 million young Americans, high-school age and under, participate in organized sports like football, basketball and soccer....
Where Living Is Lethal: Around the World, Millions of Kids Die Needlessly Each Year. Can They Be Helped?
Byline: Geoffrey Cowley To experience childhood as Americans knew it a century ago, you don't have to travel very far. Just 700 miles from Miami, on Haiti's desolate Central Plateau, obesity and food allergies and attention deficit disorder are...
Why Can't We Get Him? Two Years after the Horror of 9/11, Osama Bin Laden Appears to Be Alive, Well-And Still a Master of Media Manipulation
Byline: Michael Hirsh, Mark Hosenball and Sami Yousafzai In the Pakistani city of Peshawar, the Kissakhani bazaar is buzzing with talk of Osama bin Laden. When a new video aired by Al-Jazeera last week showed the terror chieftain walking casually...
Why Sleep Matters: When Kids Don't Get Enough Rest, Their Schoolwork Can Suffer-And So Can Their Health
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz and Karen Springen Spend some time with the Dettmann family in Emmetsburg, Iowa, and you'll know why so many school-age kids wish they could throw their alarm clocks out the window. Tyler, a 17-year-old high-school senior,...
Will He Measure Up? Growth Hormone Can Help Short Kids-But Raises Ethical Questions about Risks
Byline: Anne Underwood Height matters. No child wants to enter adolescence as the brunt of jokes, the last pick on sports teams, the teenager who shops in the kids' department for clothes. Parents worry that their short children won't get dates...
You Say You Want A Revolution
Byline: Jonathan Alter Edward Teller and Paul McCartney didn't know each other, but maybe they should have. The nuclear physicist and father of the H-bomb, who died last week at 95, was the model for Dr. Strangelove. A fierce anti-communist, his...