Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 20

2004: A Year for Witches; Two Symptomatic Movies Were 'The Passion of the Christ' and 'The Passions of the Faculty Clubs' (A.K.A. 'Fahrenheit 9/11')
Byline: George Will In 2004 an IBM supercomputer set a world record with 36.01 trillion calculations per second. The U.S. electorate may have made its calculation the instant John Kerry, who is not a supercomputer, explained why Toy's restaurant...
A Call to Mecca
Byline: B. J. Lee While traveling in the Middle East recently, LG Electronics CEO Kim Ssang Soo decided to make a phone for Muslims. It rings five times a day on the prayer hours and has a compass that points to Mecca. On a visit to India, Kim came...
A Lesser Form of Immortality? It'll Do. No One Escapes the Fate of Shelley's Ozymandias, but Great Teachers Can Put It off for a Little While
Byline: Sam Swope (Swope lives in New York City.) Mr. Krick was my grade-school art teacher, and I always looked forward to his weekly visits to our class. Given my vivid recollection of the man, it's strange that I remember only one of his lessons,...
Anxiety over Abortion; Pro-Choice Democrats Eye a More Restrictive Approach to Abortion as One Way to Gain Ground at the Polls
Byline: Debra Rosenberg The week after Thanksgiving, dozens of Democratic Party loyalists gathered at AFL-CIO headquarters for a closed-door confab on the election. John Kerry dropped by to thank members of the liberal 527 coalition America Votes....
A Tough Guy Tumbles; He's Run a Cop Shop and Dodged Bullets in Iraq. but the Trail He Left Behind Helped Keep Him from Bush's Cabinet
Byline: Mark Hosenball, Charles Gasparino and Michael Isikoff (With Evan Thomas and Kathryn Williams) Richard (Bo) Dietl and Bernard Kerik have long been familiar figures in the flashy underside of New York City night life. They could be seen swaggering...
At the Crossroads; as the U.S. Deficits Rise, So Do the Economic Risks. It's Time for a Dramatic Change in Policy, before a Crisis Hits
Byline: Robert E. Rubin (Rubin is a director of Citigroup Inc. and a former U.S. secretary of the Treasury.) The U.S. economy is at a critical juncture. on one hand, we have great advantages: our embrace of change and risk-taking, our dynamic society...
Beyond First Class; European Frequent Fliers Discover the Corporate Jet
Byline: Emily Flynn Americans used to be the big guns of corporate travel. They puffed big cigars on private jets, leaving underlings and foreigners to fly business class, one seat ahead of the tourists. When companies like Warren Buffet's NetJets,...
Capital Ideas
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn If you're saving for college in a state-run 529 plan, are you using it to best advantage? Your bottom line depends on what you pay for the account. Sometimes, annual fees can cost more than the taxes you save. If you buy...
Dimebag's Last Waltz; A Deranged Fan Kills a Heavy-Metal Hero. Why?
Byline: Kevin Peraino (With Joan Raymond and Patrick Crowley) Darrell (Dimebag) Abbott was known around the heavy-metal world for his scary stage persona. The burly lead guitarist for a group called Damageplan adorned his body with leather and tattoos,...
For Softies, Search Is the New Black; Microsoft's Ace in the Hole Is the Ability to Put Its Search Tools in Windows and Office
Byline: Steven Levy Bill Gates has a Google thing. When I asked him about the search competition last summer, he turned on the sarcasm. "We'll never be as cool as them . Every conference you go to, there they are dressed in black, and no one is...
'Hillbilly Armor'; Defense Sees It's Fallen Short in Securing the Troops. the Grunts Already Knew
Byline: Michael Hirsh, John Barry and Babak Dehghanpisheh (With Rod Nordland in Baghdad, T. Trent Gegax in New York and Eve Conant in Washington) Predators know to hunt the weakest animal in the herd. So do the Iraqi insurgents. It is an essential...
Hotel Rwanda: A Hero Will Rise
Byline: David Ansen Dapper, meticulous and obsequious, Paul Rusesabagina (Don Cheadle) is perfectly suited to his job as manager of the elegant Hotel Mille Collines in Kigali, the capital city of Rwanda. Impressed with fine Scotches and adept at...
In Good Company: Even Now, Father Knows Best
Byline: David Ansen You're the successful 51-year-old head of ad sales for a weekly sports magazine that gets scooped up by the multi-national conglomerate Globecom. Globecom wants to cut the bottom line. Globecom believes in "synergy." Globecom...
Investigations: 'I Feel Threatened'; A String of Questionable Killings and Tales of a Macabre Contest
Byline: Babak Dehghanpisheh (With Courtney Cloyd in Clay Center) It was supposed to be a routine search. Hunting for gunmen and weapons in Baghdad's Sadr City, a squad of GIs raided a house, slapped a set of plastic cuffs on the lone occupant and...
Iraq: Government Deal with a 'Merchant of Death'?
Byline: Michael Isikoff In an effort to crack down on one of the world's most notorious international criminals, President George W. Bush last summer signed an order barring U.S. citizens from doing business with Russian arms trafficker Victor Bout....
Million Dollar Baby: Clint Delivers A Knockout
Byline: David Ansen As F. Scott Fitzgerald famously wrote, there are no second acts in American lives. Somebody forgot to tell Clint Eastwood, who, at 74 and well into his third act, is doing the best, most assured work of his career. And he's...
Newsmakers
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh, Jac Chebatoris, Allison Samuels Q&A: John Mayer John Mayer's hit song "Your Body Is a Wonderland" won him his first Grammy. Last week the 27-year-old picked up two more nominations for his song "Daughters"--and he...
Paz Vega: A Not-So-Plain Jane from Spain; the Indisputable Heart of 'Spanglish'
Byline: Jennifer Ordonez When Paz Vega got the call that she'd won a starring role in a big-budget Hollywood movie, she thought the gods must be crazy. "It was shocking," she says. "It seemed impossible." Vega, an onyx-haired actress from Spain,...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom, left to right: New York Daily News, USA Today, Associated Press (2), New York Daily News, CNN, New York Times, Associated Press, Reuters, New York Daily News, Sports Illustrated "You broke up Pantera!"...
Rocking the Casbah; A Few Muslim Feminists Are out There on the Fringe, Defying Death Threats to Fight for Change. They're Also Creating Space for Moderate Reformers to Be Heard
Byline: Christopher Dickey and Carla Power (With William Underhill in London, Friso Endt in The Hague, Gameela Ismail in Cairo and Sarah Sennott in London) For more than 30 years, much of the Muslim world has been sliding backward, away from modernity....
Smart Calls (in Hindsight); Small-Stock Funds Have Beaten Big Stocks for 69 Months. Historically, It's Time for Big-Stock Indexes to Catch Up-But What Does History Really Know?
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn (Reporter Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld) How often have you heard me say, "you can't predict the market"? That's the only prediction I know that's apt to be right. This year, as usual, one surprise after another leveled investors...
Sophie Okonedo: The Bookworm's Revenge, Act I; A Brainy Brit's Breakthrough Role
Byline: Allison Samuels As Sophie Okonedo was leaving her London home for the premiere of "Hotel Rwanda," her mother reminded her of a story. When Sophie was little, someone from the government came to visit the family's public-housing flat. "They...
Spanglish: Language of Love
Byline: David Ansen Under its sitcom setup--beautiful Latina housekeeper who speaks no English goes to work for rich, dysfunctional white family in Bel Air--James L. Brooks's "Spanglish" has a lot on its mind. This culture-clash comedy is about...
Stirring Up Science; the Brightest Kids Have More Chances Than Ever to Excel in the Lab-But Their Classmates Are Struggling
Byline: Mary Carmichael (With Eve Conant) If it's true that intelligent people never get bored, 14-year-old Shannon McClintock ought to be thrilled every minute she's awake. In October her science skills won the top prize at the Discovery Channel...
Tackling the Pros: Play Hardball; Major League Baseball's Drug Policies Are a Disgrace That Threaten the Integrity of the Game. Some Modest Proposals
Byline: Mark Starr You don't have to hit Major League Baseball or its Players Association over the head with a bat for them to take baseball's drug problems seriously. No, it requires somebody on steroids to bash them over the head a couple of times...
'Taliban Are Welcome'; in a NEWSWEEK Interview, President Karzai Invites His Longstanding Enemies to Return to Afghan Society
Byline: Ron Moreau and Sami Yousafzai Eight million Afghan men and women braved Taliban threats and bad weather to cast their ballots during Afghanistan's first free presidential election this fall. A solid 55.4 percent voted for Hamid Karzai. Last...
Ten Worst Movies of 2004
1. The Village Another Big Twist special from M. Night Shyamalan, but the surprise turned out to be how dull, stilted and muddled this excursion into Ye Oldeland turned out to be. Scarily contrived. 2. Van Helsing Get the stake! This overstuffed,...
The Alpha Bloggers; Meet the Highly Evolved Community of 'A-Listers' with Growing Influence over the Tech Agenda. They Show How Radically Power Can Shift in the Age of the Internet
Byline: Steven Levy A few months ago no one had heard of "podcasting," because it didn't exist. Last summer an MTV veejay turned technophile named Adam Curry wanted to do an Internet-based radio show, distributing it through his Weblog. (A Weblog,...
The Aviator: 'Scuse Me While I Kiss the Sky; It's Christmastime and You Can Almost Smell the Oscars. David Ansen Gives Us an Epic Guided Tour of the Rest of the Year and the Best of the Year. Also, a Portfolio of the Most Exciting New Actresses Blooming This Season
Byline: David Ansen Howard Hughes envisioned by Martin Scorsese and embodied by Leonardo DiCaprio in "The Aviator" is the ultimate can-do American, a ruthless, shoot-from- the-hip capitalist not afraid to gamble his fortune buying TWA or spend four...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker Some of our reporters were struck by the level of denial. In San Diego, parents and school officials insisted to Jamie Reno that their kids couldn't possibly use steroids, even as the kids themselves told of friends who were...
The Quiet CEOs; Supercelebrity CEOs Have Had Their Day. Now a New Generation of Executives Is Focusing on Getting the Job Done, and Staying out of the Headlines
Byline: Karen Lowry Miller (This report is a collaboration with the World Economic Forum, which will hold its annual meeting Jan. 26-30 in Davos, Switzerland.) As 2004 comes to a close, one could be forgiven for wondering if the lessons of Enron,...
The Street's Dark Side; the Markets Can Still Be Treacherous for Investors
Byline: Charles Gasparino The hammer came down quickly on Wall Street after the stock-market bubble burst. Regulators and lawmakers, under pressure to avenge the losses of millions of average Americans duped by unscrupulous brokers and corporate...
The Wrong Reading List; the Philosophy of the First Bush Administration Was That Government Needs to Run More like a Business, but the Reverse Is Now More Often True
Byline: Richard Haass (Haass is president of the Council on Foreign Relations and author of "The Bureaucratic Entrepreneur: How to Be Effective in Any Unruly Organization.") In any bookstore, you'll find business shelves stuffed with case studies,...
Toxic Strength; the Headlines about Illegal Steroids Have Focused on Professional and Olympic Athletes. but the Most Vulnerable Users May Be Kids in Your Neighborhood, High-Schoolers Who Are Risking an Array of Frightful Side Effects That Can Lead to Death
***** CORRECTION: Clarification: In our Dec. 20, 2004, cover story, "Toxic Strength," we included a graphic on the potential negative side effects of steroids that featured a photograph of a model, Steve Schmall. We should have indicated that the...
Travel: An Affair to Remember
Byline: Tara Weingarten Most family reunions mean cheek pinches from Aunt Ethel, feuds with your siblings and stale stories about how awkward you looked as a teen. But today's elaborate gatherings make it all worthwhile. Really. Take Coleen and...
Uncorked: Top Sparklers
No holiday fete is complete without the bubbly. Luckily many of the world's wine regions make good sparkling wines, and at a variety of price points. Sparklers produced in the Champagne region of France earn our highest ratings, but California and...
When High Fashion Meets Low; Rather Than Fight, Some of the Biggest Names in Couture Are Either Closing Up Luxury Shops or Going to Work for the Mass-Market Retailers
Byline: Dana Thomas (With Jenny Barchfield in Paris and Marie Valla in London) On a frisky Friday night in September, Paris's chic and hip flocked to the rooftop restaurant of the Centre Pompidou to celebrate fashion's coolest new collaboration:...
'Who the Devil Really Was'; Is This the European Left's Response to Elections in Afghanistan? If So, It Had Better Brace Itself for Even Worse News: Elections in Iraq
Byline: Fareed Zakaria (Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com.) I arrived in London the day after Hamid Karzai's inauguration as Afghanistan's newly elected president. Britain's most serious left-of-center newspaper, The Guardian, reported...
Why All the Worry? Stan O'Neal on the Irrational Jitters in the Markets
Byline: Rana Foroohar Ascents don't get much steeper than Stan O'Neal's. The grandson of a slave, O'Neal remembers picking cotton in Alabama before earning his M.B.A. and working his way up at General Motors, then Merrill Lynch, where he became...